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Comment: Re:Obsession (Score 1) 135

by 0123456 (#48476025) Attached to: Australia Elaborates On a New Drift Model To Find MH370

No, I was just trying to say that they've been searching for months. The chances of finding it are growing slimmer constantly.

No, the chances are improving, as they search more of the seabed. If it's in the search area, with some luck, they'll find it. Even if something does turn up on a beach, they'll still have to conduct a similar search, though possibly of a smaller area.

Airlines have insurance, which should be enough to carry out reasonable search and rescue (well, recovery at this point) efforts. The reasonable period has long since passed.

The insurer is probably on the hook for the best part of a billion dollars of compensation payouts if this turns out to be the airline's fault. If it was a hijacking, they're probably not. I would imagine they have a very strong incentive to keep the search going until the real cause is determined.

Comment: Re:It DOES have permission (Score 1) 198

by 0123456 (#48474835) Attached to: Uber's Android App Caught Reporting Data Back Without Permission

And people still don't know what or why the app is asking for permissions and the vast majority will click yes anyway, resulting in exactly the same condition.

Not if my girlfriend is anything to go by. Her default when some app asks for an unexpected permission on her iPad is 'no'.

Most people can tell that Happy Fluffy Kitty Screensaver doesn't really need to send SMS messages, know your location, or access the Internet.

Comment: Re:Whereabouts? (Score 1) 135

by 0123456 (#48474543) Attached to: Australia Elaborates On a New Drift Model To Find MH370

Asking people to keep an eye on the beach is cheaper than flying planes around the ocean for days.

Also, I have a hard time believing there was a controlled ditching. The southern Indian Ocean has some of the worst weather in the world, and you're comparing a river to an area that may have had thirty foot waves at the time (I'm not sure what the weather actually was, but I very much doubt it was flat and calm). Besides which, it seems likely that the aircraft was out of fuel when it crashed, and why would you wait until the fuel was gone before making a controlled ditching? You'd have a much greater chance of success if the engines were still running.

Comment: Re:Why is Android allowing Uber to access the info (Score 2, Insightful) 198

by 0123456 (#48474461) Attached to: Uber's Android App Caught Reporting Data Back Without Permission

OK, so I want to use their taxi service, but their app demands permissions it obviously doesn't need. Android gives me an option of installing it or not installing it.

Now what do you suggest I do?

Android's permission model is completely broken. It's the Windows of the modern world.

Comment: Re:beyond the realm of plausibility (Score 1) 135

by 0123456 (#48474435) Attached to: Australia Elaborates On a New Drift Model To Find MH370

We had a program which located jets via afterburner IR signatures in the 1970s, I realize commercial jets aren't using afterburners but you'd think we'd have this problem licked by now.

So you're going to launch satellites which can find every airliner in the sky with IR over the entire world? Just in case one disappears again?

And note that underwing engines are probably going to make IR detection particularly hard as it will block a direct view of the exhaust.

Comment: Re:Obsession (Score 4, Insightful) 135

by 0123456 (#48474365) Attached to: Australia Elaborates On a New Drift Model To Find MH370

Even if they managed to find the wreckage and black boxes, they will yield little or no data. The is very different from the Air France crash.

We don't know that.

Even if there's nothing in the black boxes, the positions of circuit breakers may tell us how the electronics was turned off and then turned back on. A big hole in the fuselage near the cockpit would tell us that there was a fire on board, similar to the previous 777 fire. The positions of passengers and crew would tell us whether someone hijacked the plane, and whether anyone knew about it. Personal phones and tablets may contain messages from people on board.

If we can find it from a few satellite pings, we can probably figure out what happened from whatever we recover.

Comment: Re:beyond the realm of plausibility (Score 2) 135

by 0123456 (#48474331) Attached to: Australia Elaborates On a New Drift Model To Find MH370

We do know where our jets are. So long as they tell us.

In this case, it wasn't telling us. You can't ensure it tells us unless you build in hardware that can't be turned off, and then you find the next airliner loss is caused by an electrical fire in the thing you just added that can't be turned off.

MH370 had numerous ways to tell us where it went. But none of them were working, either because someone turned them off, or some electrical failure shut them down.

Comment: Re:So, in essence, Uber's app is malware (Score 5, Insightful) 198

by 0123456 (#48474315) Attached to: Uber's Android App Caught Reporting Data Back Without Permission

Or, you know, actually give us actual app permissions control so we can prevent it from retrieving this information in the first place, rather than having to agree that Happy Fluffy Kitty Screensaver can send text messages and read all my contacts or not install it at all?

Comment: Re:Whereabouts? (Score 1) 135

by 0123456 (#48473845) Attached to: Australia Elaborates On a New Drift Model To Find MH370

How can you hope to write a drift model that with any accuracy when you have no clue where the plane crashed?

We do have 'clues where the plane crashed': that's why they're now searching a relatively small area of ocean, which is the most likely place for it to have crashed.

Doesn't mean that is where it crashed, but if they follow the currents from that area and find debris on a beach, it would certainly help to confirm they're looking in the right place.

Comment: Re:Obsession (Score 2) 135

by 0123456 (#48473717) Attached to: Australia Elaborates On a New Drift Model To Find MH370

What makes these two planes so special that they get money while the government cuts funding to our health system?

Total cost of the MH370 crash, including compensation and the loss of the aircraft, is likely to hit a billion dollars. Finding out what happened is well worth a few hundred million, if it could prevent the same thing happening again.

Locating it will take a certain amount of luck, as the wreckage could be in a spot that's hard to see on sonar, but it's almost certainly somewhere in the current search area.

Entropy isn't what it used to be.

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