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The Courts

+ - Ohio University finds key to getting RIAA to stop 7

Submitted by
NewYorkCountryLawyer
NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "Ohio University, in Athens, Ohio, has found the key to getting the RIAA to stop inundating it and its students with "settlement" letters. According to the university's student online publication, the university paid $60,000, plus $16,000 per year "maintenance", to Audible Magic, the business partner of the RIAA's all-purpose expert witness Dr. Doug Jacobson, for its "CopySense" filtering software. Once it made the payments, the letters stopped. This of course raises a lot of questions as to the 'disinterestedness' of Dr. Jacobson, whose deposition in the UMG v. Lindor case was the subject of interesting Slashdot commentary."
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Ohio University finds key to getting RIAA to stop

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  • by Erris (531066) on Wednesday October 31, 2007 @03:23PM (#21188255) Homepage Journal

    They also blocked all P2P sharing [slashdot.org], which is what the RIAA would like to do to everyone. The policy is still in effect [ohio.edu], so Ohio University's network is no longer part of the internet.

    The RIAA's goal is not to protect it's property, it's to prevent competition. The war on P2P is being waged to eliminate an alternative distribution channel. SoundExchange and the war on internet radio exist to eliminate radio competition.

    • by Macthorpe (960048) on Wednesday October 31, 2007 @04:25PM (#21189063) Journal
      Please stop with this sensationalist nonsense - the ability to use P2P does not define whether you are 'part of the internet'.
      • by JoshJ (1009085)
        Sure it does. Being walled off from P2P restricts you from a sizable chunk of internet activity. The obvious analog is the great firewall of China. Are they "part of the internet"? Maybe so, you could argue that they're a part of some network, but they're not "on the internet" in the same way that someone who can access whatever they want. Both groups have their freedom limited, and are only able to use "approved" internet sites.
        • by Macthorpe (960048)

          The obvious analog is the great firewall of China.

          That's an awful comparison for so many reasons, so let's pick three.

          1) The firewall of China is about the subjugation of an entire people. Blocking P2P is about not getting your university's ass sued off for copyright infringement (don't talk to me about whether the law is right or not, it's still the law).

          2) The World Wide Web and the internet are absolutely not the same thing.

          3) Freedom to use the internet to browse and keep in contact with other cultures and the freedom to use it to download illegally a

      • the ability to use P2P does not define whether you are 'part of the internet'.

        Really? If you can't freely exchange bits with other computers on the internet, you are not part of the internet [worldofends.com]. What you are part of is some kind of private, permission based network that won't do what you want.

        • by Macthorpe (960048)

          If you can't freely exchange bits with other computers on the internet, you are not part of the internet.

          There are always going to be places on the internet that you can't access for one reason or another. I guess that means nobody is on the internet.

          What you are part of is some kind of private, permission based network that won't do what you want.

          What these students have is a network that someone else is paying for. Even if they were paying for it, they're bound by the terms of who they're paying. If they want to use P2P, they can find a provider that will let them.

          Your Consitution only protects against government intervention into your freedom of speech. If you agree not to express in a certain way priv

  • Firehose? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by NewYorkCountryLawyer (912032) * <ray.beckermanlegal@com> on Wednesday October 31, 2007 @09:31PM (#21191943) Homepage Journal
    I find this story is at the very top of Firehose for "your rights online" stories, but still hasn't been "accepted". What gives?

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