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+ - Are people addicted to piracy?-> 8

Submitted by InterjectoryIan
InterjectoryIan (666) writes "CNet is running a piece that questions whether people are technically addicted to downloading music illegally. With people having become so used to getting as much music as they want for no cost, are they failing to pry themselves from piracy and start spending their limited money again?

"The days of Kazaa were the first few hits of the download drug that the virtual dealer gave us for free. Now, BitTorrent is the heroin of data hoarders, and try as they might, it's a hard needle for addicts to dispose of."

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Are people addicted to piracy?

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  • I can only assume that by "piracy" this is actually referring to the completely unrelated practice of downloading copyrighted material via the internet without the approval of the copyright owner.

    Trying to characterize that as "piracy" is inappropriate enough without comparing it to drug use. And if it's a habit who the hell is "trying as they might" to kick it and why? I'm sorry, but the question's premise is so flawed that it can't realistically be answered.

    This reminds me of when the anti-drug mo
    • by mark-t (151149)

      I can only assume that by "piracy" this is actually referring to the completely unrelated practice of downloading copyrighted material via the internet without the approval of the copyright owner.
      How do you figure they are unrelated? While certainly not all of that the scope of piracy itself entails, copyright infringement and media piracy are most definitely intertwined.
      • Media Piracy as you are using it is a misnomer from the start. Piracy is the forceful act of stealing. Victims of piracy are left without the thing that was stolen. In order for "media piracy" to actually mean something, it would mean that the holder of the media in question no longer has access to it because it was forcefully taken away from them.

        Copyright infringement is simply not piracy by any stretch of the imagination. Media companies like to bandy the term around because it demonizes file share
        • by mark-t (151149)

          Victims of piracy are left without the thing that was stolen

          First of all, it does not require that the something stolen be tangible in order for the victim to lose it.

          Whenever somebody copies a copyrighted work without permission, the copyright holder loses a certain amount of control over who is allowed to copy the work (control that is supposed to be exclusively the property of the copyright holder for the duration of the copyright). Since the copyright holder has less control over his work after the

          • Actually no, intangible property can't be stolen. "a certain amount of control over who is allowed to copy the work" is not tangible, nor is it quantifiable. That's the origin of the term "copyright infringement". We use that term instead of theft because theft only refers to tangible things. You can no more steal so-called "intellectual property" than I can steal a thought from your head.
            • by mark-t (151149)
              Where, in a dictionary definition of "theft", is the requirement that what is stolen be tangible? Your assertion that you cannot steal thoughts from my head has no bearing on whether or not there might exist other intangible things can be stolen.
              • Okay, so let's explore that for a minute. If an intangible thing is stolen, how can you ever prove that it was? How can you demonstrate something like that? Steal a candy bar and the fact that a theft has occurred is self-evident by the lack of a candy bar where one should be.

                The RIAA/MPAA have been making the patently unprovable claim that so-called "piracy" accounts for some obscenely large pile of money that they feel they might otherwise have made. Dig into what that claim is based on and you'll
                • by mark-t (151149)

                  Okay, so let's explore that for a minute. If an intangible thing is stolen, how can you ever prove that it was?

                  Well yes... I can see how that could be problematic. Rather than debate the general issue, however... simply consider copyright infringement. In such a situation, there is provably a net loss in the amount of control that the copyright holder had previously, since the copyright holder's control was supposed to be exclusive, which by definition means that nobody else is supposed to be able to do

There is nothing so easy but that it becomes difficult when you do it reluctantly. -- Publius Terentius Afer (Terence)

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