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+ - Is it time to abandon traditional domain names? 2

Submitted by
jadin
jadin writes "We started with .com .net .org .gov .edu etc which worked as a good way to remember URLs, as well as to a limited degree identify the type of website. Things have since expanded to include countless others. We've more or less abandoned a general identifying system. In addition many of the best website names are registered, not by people making websites, but by people looking to make a future profit. So is there any reason we can't abandon it completely to allow unlimited domain name types? This would provide endless possibilities for unique and interesting domain names. This could encourage a lot more creativity in thinking up the perfect domain name. While unlimited domains won't eliminate squatters, it would definitely open up a lot more opportunities to people actually producing websites, and make it a lot harder to monopolize .coms etc. Some random examples: http://micro.soft/ http://google.search/ http://campbells.soup/ http://slashdot.dot/ Is there any reason why this wouldn't work? Technical or otherwise?"
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Is it time to abandon traditional domain names?

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  • While google.search is fairly straight-forward and easy to remember, people would find it hard to remember website URLs... If you tell someone to go to a site called "example" some people will google, while some people will just check "example.com", then "example.net", then "example.org" and give up... Also I'm not sure ofg the technical reasons but there was great debate about adding new domain names, maybe for technical reasons, maybe for practical reasons... And more huge debate when they wanted to all
  • This idea is not a good one.

    First, it increases the number of potential domain names exponentially. Sounds good, right? micro.soft? Wait, where does that period go again? If you were to have the website microsoft.com, the only potential typos are micorsoft.com, etc. With micro.soft, you get micr.osoft, micros.oft, ad infinitum. It sounds wonderful to be able to plant a period where you like but it just means that it's harder to find the site you want in the mess of parked pages.

    Second, you compl

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