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Programming

+ - The Varying Degrees of Computer Science Degrees 2

Submitted by wikid_one
wikid_one (1056810) writes "I recently went back to college to finish my CS degree, however this time I moved to a new school. My previous school taught only C++, except for a few higher level electives (OpenGL). The school I am now attending teaches what seems like every language in the book. The first two semesters are Java, and then you move to Python, C, Bash, Oracle, and Assembly. While I feel that it would be nice to get a well-rounded introduction to the programming world, I also feel that I am going to come out of school not having the expertise required in a single language to land a good job. After reading the syllabi, all the higher level classes appear to teach concepts rather than work to develop advanced techniques in a specific language. Which method of teaching is going to better provide me with the experience I need, as well as the experience an employer wants to see in a college graduate?"
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The Varying Degrees of Computer Science Degrees

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  • No degree will provide you with experience. That's what jobs and internships are for. Get an internship - government, non-profit, schools. The work you do there will get you hired. The degree will increase your salary. That's been my experience, at least.
  • After reading the syllabi, all the higher level classes appear to teach concepts rather than work to develop advanced techniques in a specific language. Which method of teaching is going to better provide me with the experience I need, as well as the experience an employer wants to see in a college graduate?"

    They teach concepts instead of implementations for a reason -- you can, and probably will have to, pick up different languages over your career. However, when you start working at corporation X and they need an ultra-fast implementation of some data structure to handle massive amounts of streaming data with performance guarantees, the prize is going to go to the guy who knows about red/black trees and Fibonacci heaps, rather than the language "expert" who codes up a naive implementation that dies the minut

FORTRAN rots the brain. -- John McQuillin

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