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HP To Charge For Service Packs and Firmware For Out-of-Warranty Customers 385

Posted by Soulskill
from the customer-service-you-can-count-on dept.
New submitter josh itnc writes "In a move that is sure to put a wedge between HP and their customers, today, HP has issued an email informing all existing Enterprise Server customers that they would no longer be able to access or download service packs, firmware patches and bug-fixes for their server hardware without a valid support agreement in place. They said, 'HP has made significant investments in its intellectual capital to provide the best value and experience for our customers. We continue to offer a differentiated customer experience with our comprehensive support portfolio. ... Only HP customers and authorized channel partners may download and use support materials. In line with this commitment, starting in February 2014, Hewlett-Packard Company will change the way firmware updates and Service Pack for ProLiant (SPP) on HP ProLiant server products are accessed. Select server firmware and SPP on these products will only be accessed through the HP Support Center to customers with an active support agreement, HP CarePack, or warranty linked to their HP Support Center User ID and for the specific products being updated.' If a manufacturer ships hardware with exploitable defects and takes more than three years to identify them, should the consumer have to pay for the vendor to fix the these defects?"
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HP To Charge For Service Packs and Firmware For Out-of-Warranty Customers

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  • by Noishkel (3464121) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @03:19AM (#46159837)

    ... they sure as hell will now.

    I'm not an IT person, but weren't there a few companies that tried this crap wwaayy back when? I seem to remember them all failing miserably.

    • by Taco Cowboy (5327) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @03:41AM (#46159957) Journal

      ... but in this case I won't fault anyone if they have to download the essential patches from pirate sites.

    • by vux984 (928602)

      Doesn't Cisco do this too? Its a royal piss off.

      • by Demonantis (1340557) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @06:52AM (#46160727)
        Yes Cisco does. I have seen it a couple times with other enterprise products. It is evil. The product basically becomes a paperweight after the planned life cycle.
      • by urbanriot (924981)
        Yes, Cisco also does this and the necessity to call them, pleading for an up-to-date firmware when your brand new Cisco unit has a 2 year old ASA bin, ASDM and VPN which won't work with your client's newer Internet Explorer. This is also why it's common amongst IT people to say "screw you Cisco" and share firmware on secret yet publicly hosted HTTP sites made available through one service contract for one device.
    • I'm not an IT person, but weren't there a few companies that tried this crap wwaayy back when? I seem to remember them all failing miserably.

      If you were a reader of slashdot you'd know that Oracle is suing companies for providing patch access to customers without a support contract right now. And people are finding ways not to be an Oracle customer (right now) as a result. Naturally HP thought it would be a good idea, as they have too many customers.

    • by synapse7 (1075571) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @09:13AM (#46161349)
      We had a 48port netgear switch that didn't pass ipv6 traffic, and netgear supported wanted to charge us for the firmware update, we didn't get it.
    • I'm not an IT person, but weren't there a few companies that tried this crap wwaayy back when? I seem to remember them all failing miserably.

      What makes this more ironic is that HP recently went the other direction on their ProCurve line, offering full features and upgrades for life. I just deployed a cluster on mid-range HP switches yesterday and they were such a better deal than Juniper, specifically because of their software support policy.

      But ... because of Juniper, Cisco, even Netgear to some degree th

  • oh well (Score:5, Insightful)

    by epyT-R (613989) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @03:20AM (#46159841)

    One more reason to avoid buying or recommending HP to would be buyers. The last thing I'd want to deal with is not being able to get a copy of a firmware update for someone's out of warranty system, server or not because I'm not "HP certified support" or whatever. In 2014, there is no fucking reason whatsoever to not have all issued patches available as direct downloads. This is especially true for legacy hardware.

    • Re:oh well (Score:5, Interesting)

      by omglolbah (731566) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @03:31AM (#46159891)

      Yeah.... this is going to bite them in the ass... hard.

      We recently had an issue with HP servers showing temperatures of 255C on motherboard sensors...
      They said this was a firmware issue and told us to flash the bios to fix this. We did... the sensor now shows -127C. Big help.

      It actually required a motherboard replacement and they claimed this was -not- a warranty issue because the server was too old. In the meantime we've had 4 more servers have this issue, which makes them unusable in our environment (oil rig HMI).

      Would they now not give us the fix without us feeding them a bit of cash? Fuck them.

      • by Isaac-1 (233099)

        HP is well onto the course IBM was 25 years ago, shoot yourself in the foot, and repeat

      • Re:oh well (Score:5, Funny)

        by JanneM (7445) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @04:01AM (#46160057) Homepage

        We recently had an issue with HP servers showing temperatures of 255C on motherboard sensors...
        They said this was a firmware issue and told us to flash the bios to fix this. We did... the sensor now shows -127C. Big help.

        "Big help" - Why are you complaining? This is great! Think of the electricity savings! Not only can you stop cooling these servers, you can actually use them to cool your other hardware!

        You're not thinking outside the box, that's the problem with you young people.

      • by TheP4st (1164315)

        We did... the sensor now shows -127C. Big help.

        Your tune will change quickly when the fridge stop working and you can chill your mountain dew in an instant.

      • Re:oh well (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Wierdy1024 (902573) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @10:53AM (#46162151)

        To be honest, it probably was a hardware issue...

        Often, those sensors are on the SMI bus (which is (basically) an 8 bit serial bus), and a chip disconnected from the SMI bus returns all binary "1"'s. If they treat that as unsigned, it is 255. If they treat it as sign and magnitude, it's -127.

        Either way the problem probably is the chip has been knocked and broken off the motherboard slightly.

    • by bazorg (911295)

      not being able to get a copy of a firmware update for someone's out of warranty system, server or not because I'm not "HP certified support" or whatever

      If I read TFS correctly, your customer can access the required resources as long as they have a valid support agreement in place with HP.

      It looks to me that HP is saying that hardware buyers are only entitled to a license for software patches if they pay some sort of annual rent. Some will pay, some will shop elsewhere.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    does not qualify as news

    • by ttucker (2884057) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @04:07AM (#46160075)

      does not qualify as news

      This is not pay for support. This is pay for firmware updates. Sure, they can charge for them when nobody else does... but I can also buy elsewhere. Fuck them, and Cisco can suck it too. Correcting bugs in 512k of firmware code is hardly adding a new feature, and doing what you are supposed to anyways is hardly premium support.

      • This is not pay for support. This is pay for firmware updates.

        How is a firmware update not support? How would you define support?

        Who pays the cost to fix old, out-of-date drivers and firmware? Is HP supposed to do it out of the goodness of their heart? At what point do they stop patching problems? An easy metric is how many support contracts they have in place for a specific piece of hardware. And the people who do pay for ongoing support shouldn't have to be subsidizing those who don't want to pay.

        • by citylivin (1250770) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @12:38PM (#46163193)

          "Who pays the cost to fix old, out-of-date drivers and firmware? Is HP supposed to do it out of the goodness of their heart?"

          Bullshit. A firmware update generally addresses some sort of bug or deficiency. By not patching it freely, HP is admitting that they sold you a flawed product. So I should be able to then demand my money back. It is their RESPONSIBILITY to fix it!!

          As others have said, the worst company with this is cisco. The second worst is sonicwall. Fuck sonicwall and their paid updates!! I had to throw out a perfectly good VPN appliance whoes compact flash card had died because they would not let me download a firmware for the unit. Not because I didnt have a service contract with them, but because I didnt have a service contract for that one particular VPN appliance. I had another contract with another appliance which we purchased later.

          If the fix is already made, then keeping it from former customers unless they pay up is spiteful ransom. A firmware update is addressing flaws in the vendors product. The vendor would do well to get them fixed, or you get a very bad reputation such as sonicwall has with me now.

          If I had to maintain support contracts with every vendor i've ever done business with on the off chance that one day I will need an update, I would not be able to ever purchase anything new. Your old assets would become drags. This is similar to why I always try and find open source software alternatives for everything I possibly can. Specifically because in software world, it is very common to charge for every update. Result, I don't buy much paid for software when I have open source alternatives. With hardware, its a lot harder to change products when some bug is encountered.

          All this is is a giant ad for dell servers, who I have never had a problem with getting drivers or updates for. If dell can do it, then sure as shit HP can. I was actually looking at HP servers for a friend, but I guess I will be recommending dell now. HP fails it. Short term profits trump everything and I am so sick of it.

          • by ttucker (2884057)
            I just canceled an HP order for a significant number of machines in favor of Dell, thanks to this article.
        • by sjames (1099)

          Who pays the cost to fix old, out-of-date drivers and firmware? Is HP supposed to do it out of the goodness of their heart?

          No, they're supposed to provide perfect firmware and drivers from the start. Since it's easily fixable later and perfect software is known to be very difficult, we can cut them some slack and allow them to provide fixes in the form of updates rather than demanding a replacement machine. But for them, to demand payment to fix something that shouldn't have been wrong in the first place is going a bit far.

    • by sjames (1099)

      More like company demands more money to fix manufacturing defects.

  • I cannot believe they would do something like this. Is there something that I do not understand about this? Is it really that much of a burden to provide access to updates?
    • by FaxeTheCat (1394763) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @03:38AM (#46159933)

      Is there something that I do not understand about this?

      Yes. They want more customers to pay for support.
      What THEY do not understand is that people will start buying Dell.

      • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

        But.. but... they are going to "provide the best value and experience for our customers"! Surely paying for vital security and bug fixes to make your product work properly is a better value experience than getting them for free!?

        Their statement is like a parody of reason.

        • it will certainly destroy the value of their second hand equipment.

          All of my home computing is three year old refurbished corporate stuff precisely because it does have decent bug fixing and driver updates. Quite apart from being less than a third of the original sale price to buy.

          Lenovo support is still free.

          Wonder what is going to be done with all the thousands of tons of useless HP equipment at the end of its three year life? I hear that landfill is pretty much full these days.

    • by khasim (1285)

      Is it really that much of a burden to provide access to updates?

      It costs MORE to put a system in place to verify your contract status before allowing you to download something than it does to just have the download publicly available.

      If this was about saving money they'd look into a torrent.

      This is about trying to turn an expense into a profit.

  • by MarkvW (1037596) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @03:25AM (#46159861)

    Hewlett and Packard were something special.

    Now it's just a bunch of MBAs trying to massage their stock price.

    • by Ungrounded Lightning (62228) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @04:16AM (#46160103) Journal

      Now it's just a bunch of MBAs trying to massage their stock price.

      You got that right.

      Algorithm:
        - Get hired for a big salary and a LOT of stock options.
        - Make the company appear more profitable by cutting off investments in the future to reduce costs now.
        - Declare victory and what a great guy you are.
        - Cash in the stock options and move on to a bigger company where you can repeat the process for even more money and reputation points. PROFIT!
        - Your successor inherits the house of cards and takes the blame when it collapses a few years later.

      The Harvard Business School has a reputation for graduates who use this algorithm.

      Interestingly, boards of directors keep falling for this. (You'd think they'd look at what happens to companies candidates had "turned around" in the several years AFTER they left when evaluating CEO, COO, and CFO candidates. But apparently they usually don't.)

      = = = =

      Similarly, if a high company official starts enthusing about the book "Crossing the Chasm" and you're an early hire, cash any vested stock options and get out, before you and the other early hires are laid off. (Interestingly, they usually fire them too soon, when they're still key to the company's success, and the company usually falls INTO the chasm rather than crossing it.)

      • by AmiMoJo (196126) * <mojo @ w orld3.net> on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @08:34AM (#46161111) Homepage

        You'd think they'd look at what happens to companies candidates had "turned around" in the several years AFTER they left when evaluating CEO, COO, and CFO candidates. But apparently they usually don't.

        No, that is part of the scam. The MBA applying for the new job points out how everything went to shit after they left, so clearly their genuius is worth paying big bucks for and any other merely qualified applicant will surely fail in such a high pressure, highly skilled role.

    • by SJ (13711) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @04:21AM (#46160123)

      You're mistaking this company for the original HP. "HP" nowadays is actually Compaq. The old HP that everyone knew and loved is now (at least used to be) Aligent. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A... [wikipedia.org]
      They are now Aligent and Keysight.

      So anywhere you read something about "HP" doing something stupid... Think "Compaq" instead, and it all makes sense.

      • by dargaud (518470) <slashdot2@gd[ ]aud.net ['arg' in gap]> on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @06:46AM (#46160705) Homepage
        Aligent ? The company that, when I purchased memory upgrades for our digital oscilloscopes, send me a huge box. Containing carefully wrapped smaller boxes. Containing yet other carefully wrapped smaller boxes. Containing a wrapped envelopes. Containing a number to type on each oscilloscope, and 'poof!' magic, the memory doubled.

        Needless to say I was outraged. Not so much at the waste of cardboard and foam material. Not so much at the fact that they couldn't send 8 numbers by email. No, at the fact that the memory was already inside our equipment that we'd paid for, but that we needed to pay extra to actually use it. Fuckers. I now do everything in my power to make sure we never buy from people who use this kind of commercial behavior.

        • by dargaud (518470)
          Aligent. Agilent. Whatever. It's not like I need to remember their name except to avoid them.
        • by drinkypoo (153816)

          Needless to say I was outraged. Not so much at the waste of cardboard and foam material. Not so much at the fact that they couldn't send 8 numbers by email. No, at the fact that the memory was already inside our equipment that we'd paid for, but that we needed to pay extra to actually use it.

          So you're not angry that the vendor overcharges you for RAM, and for shipping, and is bad at packaging (HP sent me four cardboard boxes in a bigger cardboard box once just to send me four license keys printed out on paper as well, one sheet per box, one key per page) but you're mad that they've found a way to save money on shipping that actually saves you money and still permits them to sell you options which you don't even have to install? Would you like several large wheels of cheese with your inexplicabl

  • This is it (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Trogre (513942) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @03:32AM (#46159899) Homepage

    Ladies and gentleman, this is it.

    This is the end of Hewlett Packard.

  • Service packs? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @03:33AM (#46159903)

    Aren't service packs and firmware updates fixes to defective computers/software? Why are they trying to charge for fixing something that is not supposed to be broken in the first place?

    • Re:Service packs? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @03:40AM (#46159951)
      And they get a perverse incentive to deliberately deliver broken products from the outset.
      • Mod parent up!

      • by drsmithy (35869)

        And they get a perverse incentive to deliberately deliver broken products from the outset.

        No they don't.

        All customers will have support contracts for a hardware purchase for 12 months.
        The vast majority will then have them for another 2 years.
        A sizeable chunk for probably another year or two after that.

        Nearly all bugs are going to be found in the first couple of years, probably in the first 6 months, when pretty much everyone will have support contracts. Ie: they'll need to be fixed.

        • And they get a perverse incentive to deliberately deliver broken products from the outset.

          No they don't.

          Yes they do.

          The vast majority will then have them for another 2 years.

          Which they paid extra for. Incentive.

          A sizeable chunk for probably another year or two after that.

          Which they again paid extra for. Yet more incentive. And still perverse.

    • by will_die (586523)
      On the rare occurances that I update our server BIOS/firmware it is to add new capabilities in the form of recognition of new types of hardware devices or new software.
  • Remember when one of their pilot-ey guys in engineering wasn't put on their new microcomputer division?
  • If a manufacturer ships hardware with exploitable defects and takes more than three years to identify them, should the consumer have to pay for the vendor to fix the these defects?"

    If it took longer than the warranty period (remember, you still get free access as long as the warranty is valid) - why not?

    Look at this the other way. Lets say you sell something you warrant to work for three years. Some four years later, there's some kind of security flaw - why should the company not need some extra funds to

    • Re:Devils Advocate (Score:5, Insightful)

      by antifoidulus (807088) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @03:48AM (#46159993) Homepage Journal
      Look at this the other way. Lets say you sell something you warrant to work for three years. Some four years later, there's some kind of security flaw - why should the company not need some extra funds to develop a fix? To my mind this change is something that will lead to better support for older products, because you can keep on paying and demanding fixes for your payments...

      Car analogy! Have you ever heard of a safety recall? You will note that it isn't only new vehicles, or vehicles still under warranty that get recalled. It's ALL the defective vehicles, and the manufacturer has to pay for the repairs. Why you may ask? Because they designed something that is faulty and thus poses a risk not only to the people who bought the car, but to everyone else on the road. Why should software security be any different? If you get compromised, it doesn't just affect you, it can potentially affect a lot of other people.

      Now of course for bugs that aren't security related you maybe have a point, if the back seat cupholder tends to break in a car the manufacturer may not be held reliable to fix it, as it doesn't pose a safety risk, but of course not fixing it is sort of a dick move....
      • That's a pretty good analogy (as car analogies so often are for some reason), but I can see where HP could still provide real security fixes for free while providing patches simply to work with newer hardware, could fall under the blanket agreement.

        The real question in my mind is, if you buy support just to download a patch and then cancel again, are you obligated to uninstall the patch, and will they provide the patch reverter to do so. :-)

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by SuricouRaven (1897204)

        Except that due to the extreme complexity of computer products, it's practically impossible to make anything non-trivial that isn't initially riddled with defects.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        Yes, but cars are heavily regulated, computers are not... In addition, there is a time limit beyond which they no longer do recalls and the manufactures no longer have to pay for them.

        After all, when is the last time you heard of a recall of a 1978 Chevy? There is a sunset period beyond which no one cares anymore. With the speed of computer development, that period is much shorter than cars.

        • by drinkypoo (153816)

          Yes, but cars are heavily regulated, computers are not... In addition, there is a time limit beyond which they no longer do recalls and the manufactures no longer have to pay for them.

          After all, when is the last time you heard of a recall of a 1978 Chevy? There is a sunset period beyond which no one cares anymore.

          That sunset period is ten years.

          With the speed of computer development, that period is much shorter than cars.

          The sunset period reflects the period in which the product may be in use, not the period in which the product is state of the art. Many servers are regularly in place for ten years. The average age of [a] personal computer was 4.5 years in 2006. [statista.com] The average age of a car in the US is now 11.4 years [autonews.com] and the lifespan of an OTR truck is 4-5 years [glostone.com]. It seems reasonable to have a 10 years sunset lifespan on computers to me, especially given that their useful lifespans are increasin

    • Lets say you sell something you warrant to work for three years. Some four years later, there's some kind of security flaw - why should the company not need some extra funds to develop a fix? To my mind this change is something that will lead to better support for older products, because you can keep on paying and demanding fixes for your payments...

      Let's say that I buy a brand new HP product, and then inside of 1 month I notice a bug in the firmware. It doesn't stop the system working, because that server is not hosting anything on its secondary RAID array other than a set of backup disks that I can put on a different controller (i.e. it causes a problem, but I have an easy and 100% effective workaround). However, I report the bug to HP. On that server, I download all available firmware updates and apply them as they are released.
      3 years later, that s

      • While that all sounds nice, you're leaving off an option. What if, without the payments, HP simply does not fix anything for any hardware that is out of warranty?

        If they say "we'll keep fixing and updating for 3 years, then forget it, on to the new stuff", then what?

        Just consider that, before you throw out the baby with the bath water. Why exactly do they have to provide updates forever?

        Frankly, Microsoft has done everyone a huge disservice by supporting XP for so long, people have gotten this idea

      • In this scenario, I suppose you could invoice HP for a "consulting fee" for finding and reporting the bug to them. Troubleshooting an issue caused by broken firmware costs time too, y'know...
  • by Nick Lowe (3421741) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @03:41AM (#46159963)
    Wow! What a great reason to avoid buying new server hardware from HP! It is a massive disincentive to purchase. I cannot help but think this is supremely short sighted and a decision made by somebody up high who is not technically inclined.
    • by tibit (1762298)

      I now really revel in having the foresight to use HP for networking gear, and Dell for servers. This division of labor has kept me happy for 15+ years.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @03:43AM (#46159975)

    Its happened twice this year that I've tried to find drivers on the HP website for notebooks aged 3-5 years, and found they're not on the HP website. After phoning HP I'm told that warranty isn't valid and for this kind of support I must pay an hourly fee. Only after threats of a lawsuit and an hour of my time occupied, the rep has been able to e-mail the drivers to me, instead of actually listing them on their website for the other owners of the same models.

    • by oobayly (1056050)

      That's interesting, my experience was the exact opposite. I was recycling my HP desktop for a colleague to use and realised that I hadn't created recovery media after sticking Linux on it. I called HP expecting to be charged for the media (it was 18 months out if warranty) and the bloke just sent it out free of charge. It turns out I now have two copies - I found the original media when clearing out a cupboard a month later.

      Maybe the difference was consumer grade laptop vs business grade desktop, even if it

  • What? (Score:5, Funny)

    by edibobb (113989) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @03:58AM (#46160053) Homepage
    Did HP hire Ballmer?
  • by angrygretchen (838748) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @04:10AM (#46160085)
    We are a small shop and we are running 3 VMs on a single HP Proliant G7 Server. It has enough memory and resources that it could probably run an additional 7 VMs if we wanted to. HP is having to face the reality that the people are buying less hardware because realistically the ratio of VMs to servers is high as 10:1. HP is trying to gouge customers on the warranty because they can't make it up in server sales. Our Proliant DL380 G7 hit the 3 year mark a few months ago and is now out of warranty. The additional cost of the most basic warranty (4 hours/day phone, no onsite) for a single Proliant server is approximately $3000 for three years. That is easily half the cost of the server. And that's the cheapest warranty option. Don't even ask about the 24/7 onsite warranty. This change effectively kills the secondary market for HP hardware. Denying access to firmware means that it will be next to impossible to install or update your OS. I've had to run the HP SPP firmware upate several times to address issues that would otherwise have rendered our Proliant server useless. In fact I have an unresolved issue with our server where it refuses to reboot to the OS, unless I boot from the HP SPP tool first. If I need a critical firmware update in the future, the only option may be the Piratebay. Ugh If HP doesn't reverse this decision, our next server will most likely be a Dell. Unless Dell decides to follow HP into the dark side as well.
    • But you're also your own problem. HP wants (or needs) you to buy a new server every 3 years. You already say that you run 3 VMs, but that your existing hardware can handle 7 more.

      Now you're saying you don't want to buy from HP again, but you don't need to, your existing hardware is enough and probably will be for another 3 years. You aren't actually an HP customer anymore, it has now been too long and you won't buy in the near future either.

      HP has done the math and figured that customers like you are

  • by Bomarc (306716) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @04:47AM (#46160241) Homepage
    Last year -- I downloaded all the Compaq (now HP) SP's from their FTP site -- don't quite know what to do with them. I downloaded all of the SP's in case HP stopped supporting 'older' Compaq's (There are several of the old systems that I like for nostalgia)

    Now for the big problem: HP or Dell. Dell is firing 15,000 of it's employees --- and HP's new support policy sucks (REALLY sucks).

    My question is .. is this policy going to follow through with other HP equipment? I've got a HP color laser jet printer: Will I experience the same issue with that? I've got three HP scanners -- will I need to put them in the garbage? (No one will want them if they can't get even basic driver support).

    I do know this much: If I need to "throw away" otherwise perfectly good equipment as HP will not provide basic user accessible support for it -- I will not replace the equipment from the same manufacturer with the same BAD policy. I have three 'old' Proliant (580, 585 & 360) servers in use now. If (when) they fail -- the equipment will not be replaced with modern equipment from HP (assuming this policy remains in place).
    • by Chrisq (894406) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @05:28AM (#46160357)

      Now for the big problem: HP or Dell.

      There's always Oracle hardware [oracle.com].... OK this is self-confessed flamebate!

      • by jabuzz (182671)

        Oracle started requiring a valid support contract to download these sorts of things years ago. A lot of people stopped purchasing Oracle/Sun hardware specifically because of this.

        The view held by most system admins, and historically the way it has been is that firmware updates for your servers are free of charge. Actual hardware issues (failed disks, PSU's etc.) will require a support contract to be in place or you are on your own.

        While I am sure that this will maximize HP's profits in the short term long t

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      Now for the big problem: HP or Dell. Dell is firing 15,000 of it's employees --- and HP's new support policy sucks (REALLY sucks).

      Why not Lenovo? It's not like you can actually trust the PCs you get delivered from HP or Dell not to carry malware. In the bargain you might get some PCs that actually work.

  • In which countries? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by ukoda (537183) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @05:33AM (#46160375) Homepage
    I suspect they will only try this in some countries. They would be in breach of consumer laws in countries like New Zealand to charge to fix defects.

    Regardless, other have said, it will weight in favour of other suppliers for new purchases.
  • No one needs to use their products. This puts them at a competitive disadvantage.

    Indifferent to anything else, this is a stupid business decision. Who is management at this company and why are they incompetent?

  • by MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @06:10AM (#46160547)

    A few years from now, HP will no longer sell hardware.

  • I just recommended a laserjet multifunction printer to my dad (he was burning through ink in am inkjet and his scanner was getting flakey under OS X).

    What should I recommend people in the future? Particularly the Linux/OS X crowd? Or am I just jumping a little too early?

    (I'm a little nervous as the installation process for my Laserjet m1217 on Linux Mint involves downloading a proprietary blob from HP.)

  • by bwcbwc (601780) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @08:57AM (#46161231)

    I would demand a refund for any defect found in firmware/etc.

    This is only going to lead to court cases where the defect report was filed during the warranty, but the fix comes out after warranty expiration.

  • by Theovon (109752) on Wednesday February 05, 2014 @09:21AM (#46161419)

    They charge too much and their hardware is always out of date.

    I decided to buy some seriously high-end computing equipment for research, and I compared HP, Dell, and Red Barn. For the same price, Red Barn gave me newer hardware, more hardware, faster turn-around on quotes, better service, faster build times, and faster customer service. http://rbtginc.redbarncomputers.com

Wasn't there something about a PASCAL programmer knowing the value of everything and the Wirth of nothing?

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