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Microsoft GUI Windows

Microsoft Has Been Watching, and It Says You're Getting Used To Windows 8 675

Posted by samzenpus
from the how-I-learned-to-love-windows dept.
Dupple writes "Microsoft's user data shows that users are getting used to dealing with the Windows 8 user interface, reports this article at MIT Technology Review. Despite some of the more scathing reviews of Windows 8, ordinary users are getting along with it just fine, according to Julie Larson-Green, the Microsoft executive who leads Windows product development. Data collected automatically from some Windows users, she says, show they are adjusting to some of the new operating system's controversial features without problems 'So far we're seeing very encouraging things,' Larson-Green says of the large volume of data that Microsoft receives every day from people using Windows 8 who have chosen to join the company's 'customer experience improvement program.' All users are invited to enroll in that program when they first log into the new operating system. If they do so, anonymized information about how they are using the operating system is sent to Microsoft. Referring to complaints from some quarters, Larson-Green says: 'Even with the rumblings, we feel confident that it's a moment in time more than an actual problem.'"
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Microsoft Has Been Watching, and It Says You're Getting Used To Windows 8

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 17, 2012 @09:42AM (#42313667)

    I don't know a single company whose IT will implement Windows 8 on anything. I'm talking everything from tablets, phones, laptops, PC's, or servers. In fact my company said straight out "No" because of all the problems it would entail.

    Did they ever fix the lack of command line for windows 8 servers?

  • Poor Sample Pool (Score:0, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 17, 2012 @09:43AM (#42313675)

    most techs-savvy users, or people who know what they're doing just click 'no' to any such data collection prompts so the sample is going to be severely skewed towards people who have ended up with this bundled and know no different.

  • by Stickiler (2767941) on Monday December 17, 2012 @09:43AM (#42313679)
    Are already probably lenient towards Microsoft, so they will of course make themselves learn the new UI. About 80% of the people I know just automatically click no and go past it, and the other 20% make an active effort to click no and go past it. It's like polling the people at a major sporting event about how enjoyable they find that sporting event.
  • by erroneus (253617) on Monday December 17, 2012 @09:44AM (#42313697) Homepage

    I am not saying that Windows 8 is even remotely similar to prison rape (though some might suggest there may be some similarities, I am not saying that) but the very notion that a party or group is getting used to something does not mean they like it or want it.

    I supposed I could have said "taxes" or any other thing people generally don't like, but I wanted to be a little edgy... a little dramatic.

    So yes. We acknowledge Microsoft is shoving their things [Windows 8 in this case] through our [choose an orifice] and we acknowledge that we presently don't have much choice in the matter.

  • 3 month rule (Score:5, Insightful)

    by weszz (710261) on Monday December 17, 2012 @09:45AM (#42313707)

    Anyone really surprised?

    Give any big change 3 months and it will get accepted if you don't give in as the change forcer.

    I've seen it at work too many times to count. Manglement makes a decision that upsets everyone and lots of people talk about how they are going to start looking elsewhere for employment and the sky will fall and this is terrible, but after the 3 month gripe period, everyone accepts the changes and life moves on.

    It's how things work.

  • Warm feeling (Score:5, Insightful)

    by morcego (260031) on Monday December 17, 2012 @09:48AM (#42313727)

    Data collected automatically from some Windows users

    Oh, that gives me such a warm feeling inside...

  • by Sponge Bath (413667) on Monday December 17, 2012 @09:49AM (#42313741)

    That sums it up. Nothing in the article about people liking or preferring the New Windows Order. Just the limp pronouncement that people who must use Windows are finding ways of grinding through the experience.

  • Much Like ... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohn@nOsPam.gmail.com> on Monday December 17, 2012 @09:50AM (#42313745) Journal

    Microsoft Has Been Watching, and It Says You're Getting Used To Windows 8

    Much like a kid who has broken his arm "gets used to" a cast or sling. Much like a cow who has been electrocuted many times by a fence "gets used to" staying away from it. Much like someone convicted of a DUI "gets used to" riding a bicycle.

    'Even with the rumblings, we feel confident that it's a moment in time more than an actual problem.'

    Under what circumstances, exactly, would someone who works for Microsoft ever say anything contrary to that? Anything could be going on, good or bad, and that is exactly what they would say to dismiss criticism.

  • by Motard (1553251) on Monday December 17, 2012 @09:51AM (#42313757)

    Well, if the population being measured does not include the 'tech-savvy', the results suggest a pretty successful transition.

  • by Sockatume (732728) on Monday December 17, 2012 @09:52AM (#42313761)

    First of all, I'm not sure what bundling has to do with it. I mean, as opposed to all the Windows 8 user data they're getting from people who didn't have Windows 8 installed on their PC?

    Secondly, surely if the user data was skewed to less-competent users then a more representative sample would should an even quicker rate of acclimitisation?

    I'm sceptical of the kind of coarse-grain user data they're surely getting, and the conclusions themselves* but I genuinely can't tell what your point is here.

    *That people are able to comfortably use Windows 8 within a few weeks shouldn't be a cause for celebration, that should be the level below which everyone in the project gets fired. The cheering shouldn't start until your design changes are shown to have led to improvements that are worth the cost.

  • by Jerry Atrick (2461566) on Monday December 17, 2012 @09:53AM (#42313769)

    It's mind boggling, only 90% managed to use the start screen and charms on day1.

    So in that 10% are folk that failed to work out how to get the login prompt from the completely control free boot page. And people who failed to shutdown their PC making up the bulk of it - since that needs the charmless bar.

    Just to install ClassicShell or fire up the desktop to use it with needs use of both the start screen and charms. So even if you never use them again you still count as a MS success in these stats.

    Any other company would be panicking over a 10% fail rate just starting up their software, not claiming it as a success.

  • by bobstreo (1320787) on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:00AM (#42313831)

    I think it's more like stockholm syndrome
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stockholm_syndrome [wikipedia.org]

  • by MatrixCubed (583402) on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:07AM (#42313923) Homepage

    Don't confuse "ignorance about alternatives" with "desire to purchase".

    Many users only "see" Windows. They don't know about Linux, and consider Mac OS as "those things that aren't Windows that other people have".

  • Re:3 month rule (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Opportunist (166417) on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:09AM (#42313947)

    That doesn't mean that they like the new situation more than the old one. And while at work there may be some good reason why you have to adapt to a management change because the primary concern is the well being of the company and not yours, pardon please if I put MY comfort ahead of that of MS.

  • by pscottdv (676889) on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:11AM (#42313975)

    The windows button finally has purpose. You can hit that button, start typing an app name and then space/enter to launch

    So... It's just like DOS except you have to hit the windows key before you type the name of the program you want to launch.

    The more things change, the more they stay the same...

  • by mark-t (151149) <markt@lynx. b c .ca> on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:13AM (#42313997) Journal

    You can probably "get used to" almost anything when you aren't given a choice. Heck, you can "get used to" chronic back pain too...

    But that's a far cry from meaning that a person actually prefers it

  • by Peristaltic (650487) * on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:17AM (#42314041)
    "Getting used to it".... Right. After about 6 months my dad told me that he was getting used to his chemotherapy, too- somehow this wasn't a very good selling point for the experience.
  • by rudy_wayne (414635) on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:18AM (#42314053)

    I've noticed a couple different things:

    1) It makes me a lot more selective about putting things on the taskbar and desktop.

        a) I put things I really do use out there, so things are highly geared to my workflow

        b) Things I find I'm not using get punted
    2) The windows button finally has purpose. You can hit that button, start typing an app name and then space/enter to launch. I find I'm mousing less actually.

    In addition, Windows 8 hasn't come with the alternating-release-something-new instability problems we've gotten used to. It's every bit as solid as 7 and has better integrated security features. Win, win in my book.

    LOL!!

    Type the name of an app and then hit enter. Welcome to DOS. Are we suddenly back in 1992?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:23AM (#42314087)

    That'll take a decade, ala Windows XP. By then Windows 10 will be out. So, no thanks.

    Get left behind by the business community, you shills crack me up.

  • by theVarangian (1948970) on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:23AM (#42314095)

    Well, if the population being measured does not include the 'tech-savvy', the results suggest a pretty successful transition.

    Let's face it, the most conservative grouches who most venomously oppose anything new in UIs and desktop environments are usually the "tech savvy" and them nerdier they are the more potent the venom. Just take one look at the angry tirades over Gnome 3.... Ok, so they changed Gnome, learn to like the new UI or fork the old one, it's not the end of the world. I'm a Mac user but I actually kind of like the new Windows UI, it's different and innovative. Microsoft deserves some credit for not taking the path of least resistance and aping somebody else's UI like Google did.

  • by somersault (912633) on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:24AM (#42314105) Homepage Journal

    Regular unsophisticated users get along just fine because they aren't emotionally attached to things like user interfaces. It's only the whiny IT crowd who has a problem.

    Regular unsophisticated users bumble along doing things by rote memory or by really bizarre roundabout routes because they don't know the most efficient way to do things. The "whiny IT crowd" like to be able to get to the features they want without dealing with bullshit like the ribbon bar (which according to TFA the designer of said bar also designed Windows 8).

  • by gl4ss (559668) on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:28AM (#42314151) Homepage Journal

    win9, or win8.5 will be out next year. by then they'll maybe have figured out if they really think people want to use 2 apps at the same time. or that people want to use applications instead of cut down appzzzzzzzz.
    besides, wolfgang certainly isn't buying more surface pro's because he hasn't bought the first one.

    anyways, people who haven used windows 8 for 3 months have used windows 8 for 3 months without switching to apple - what kind of fucking stupid poll is that?!

  • by jythie (914043) on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:31AM (#42314177)
    Being forced to upgrade by end of lifing support does not make Win7 any less 'good enough for me', it just means taking the option away.

    Not sure what you are going on about with being 'left behind'. I am skeptical many businesses out there refuse to interoperate with other businesses because they are not running the latest and greatest software. I still see, for instance, a great deal of standardization on .DOC rather then .docx, and I do not recall seeing any companies saying 'sorry, your file format is out of date, no business for you'.
  • by SmallFurryCreature (593017) on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:32AM (#42314189) Journal

    Call me a skeptic but somehow the very fact that MS feels the need to say this, shows people are NOT picking up Windows 8. Yeah, so early adapters of the new MS vision who are so in love with the company they allow it to see everything they do, are sticking with it... and? Fans of a dog food company eat their favorite companies dog food. Doesn't mean it doesn't tastes like... well like nothing actually, animal food lacks spicing.

    If Windows 8 adoption was really good, MS would be crowing about actual sales figures. They are not. For the truth NEVER listen to what a spokesman says, listen for what he doesn't say.

    Basically, people that haven't given up on Windows 8 or refused to even start using it or didn't mind MS watching over their shoulder, haven't given up in large volumes. Damned by faint praise? If this is the best press release they could come up with, the truth is far more dire.

    Want proof? Go back in history and read MS press release on Bob, ME and Vista.

  • by realityimpaired (1668397) on Monday December 17, 2012 @10:59AM (#42314409)

    Secondly, surely if the user data was skewed to less-competent users then a more representative sample would should an even quicker rate of acclimitisation?

    The headline says people are getting used to it, not that they like it.

    Case in point, my mother's got an old laptop that doesn't have a multitouch touchpad. I am able to use it, but I find myself cursing the lack of features like two-finger scrolling. If I use it for any prolonged period of time, I remember how to use edge scrolling instead... I still miss the convenience of two-finger scrolling, etc., but I adapt to what I'm given. As soon as I'm back on my own laptop again, I breathe a sigh of relief.

    As to Windows 8 users... the non-technical users are the ones who are least likely to have the option to go back to what they prefer, so they adapt to what they have. That doesn't mean they like it, it means that they don't have a choice in the matter.

  • Re:Warm feeling (Score:2, Insightful)

    by assertation (1255714) on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:04AM (#42314445)

    +1

    I'm glad someone mentioned having a problem with Microsoft collecting data off of people PERSONAL Computers (PC)

  • by PlusFiveTroll (754249) on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:10AM (#42314507) Homepage

    Because a lot of people have an issue with..

    "This application is going to send off 'some stuff you don't understand.. bla bla tech bla' to servers somewhere you don't know." They automatically mistrust a program that sends off unknown information when presented with the choice.

    What Microsoft says. "Send anonymous usage details to Microsoft servers"

    What the user reads. "Send your porn viewing habits to god knows where and who"

  • by Lawrence61 (868933) on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:14AM (#42314551)
    "Getting used to dealing with it". Wow, that must be some operating system. I'm sure Microsoft is sure proud of that. In time people can get used to all sorts of things, an operating system shouldn't be one of them. It should just work, and get out of the way of the user and be intuitive. In other words, more opposite of what windows 8 is.
  • by Rogerborg (306625) on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:20AM (#42314627) Homepage
    Because this "program" isn't about making the product better, it's just about collecting some numbers - any numbers - that can be used in the sentence "Windows 8 is an astonishing success because X of our users figured out how to do Y within Z seconds."
  • by brianwski (2401184) on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:22AM (#42314633) Homepage
    Hello, nice to meet you. Now you do know somebody who uses the start menu. I'm typing this on a Windows 7 64 bit system, and I use the "Start" menu all the time. Personally I keep a list of the top 10 applications I launch (Chrome, Visual Studio, a screen capture utility, etc) right at the very top level of the "Start" menu so I can get to them quickly, but the shortcuts disappear (when I release the mouse button) and don't clutter my view all the time.

    I work at a company that does both Mac and Windows apps deployed to customer's desktops. So we *HAVE* to stay current and support all the new Microsoft and Apple OS releases. Windows 8 is the future, it's just that the future really sucks. The only thing keeping my spirits up for now is the hope that Microsoft comes to its senses and makes Windows 8.5 or Windows 9 suck less. Honestly I don't have much hope left, they are still pushing the tool ribbon and pretending it is a success. Microsoft doesn't like to admit it made a mistake, even when the evidence is overwhelming.
  • by Columcille (88542) on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:29AM (#42314711) Homepage
    "Personally I keep a list of the top 10 applications I launch (Chrome, Visual Studio, a screen capture utility, etc) right at the very top level of the "Start" menu so I can get to them quickly"

    So put them on the metro page. Functions in a similar way: press the windows key and you'll see all your pinned apps for quick and easy access as well as be able to just type the name of any given app you may want.

    Prior to the release of Win8, I was highly, highly critical. Thought it was the dumbest thing MS had ever done. As someone who went through the pain of WinME, that's saying a lot. But I've gotten used to it. Still spend almost all my time in the desktop, but I've grown to like the metro apps for things like easy access for my kids. I still think MS made a mistake by not at least making a full-desktop-mode option, but I can live with Metro and find it beneficial in some ways. I certainly haven'y been hampered by it at all.
  • Wrong Sample Pool (Score:4, Insightful)

    by http (589131) on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:33AM (#42314749) Homepage Journal
    I have some formal training in HCI and a love of accurate terminology, so I have the ability to articulate problems with a user interface - I can voice my opinion and experience with weak design. A regular user doesn't have those skills, so they appear silent. The end result is that you call us IT types whiny.
    "Less sophisticated users" aren't getting along fine. They struggle to use it and/or call for help because bad user interfaces (and arbitrary vendor changes) interfere with the creation of an accurate mental model of how the software is supposed to be used or what it's capable of. The confusion created in their mind is real.
  • by raehl (609729) <raehl311@yaho[ ]om ['o.c' in gap]> on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:33AM (#42314753) Homepage

    Seriously, I don't... I still have my keyboard from 1993 because these new ones stink.

    More seriously - I use my computer for work. Not kids, not watching videos, not games, WORK. Windows XP/7 is better at getting work done than Windows 8.

    Hopefully microsoft pulls their heads out of their butts on this and allows a quick setting change to "I have no use for metro, thanks."

  • by slashmydots (2189826) on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:39AM (#42314805)
    Or, perhaps, you could not waste your money and get stable, working, long-term Thinkpads with flip screens running Windows 7 Pro (downgrade rights) and dual batteries for cheaper than a pro tablet and it comes with a DVD drive and full keyboard. Or are you one of the IT departments that buys pretty, shiny, trendy gear to impress the boss instead of actually get work done?
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:41AM (#42314827)

    I just watched the first of those two videos.

    I have had Windows 8 for about two weeks now, and I tell people that I hate it.

    I agree with the GP here, that the problem is that it is not intuitive how to do anything.

    I purchased Windows 8 Pro Upgrade and installed it. Aside from a single post-card sized piece of paper, it comes with no documentation what-so-ever. There are a few cues on the screen the first time, and that's it. I probably learned more from watching just that one video that from playing around with Windows 8.

    My question is, "Why couldn't Microsoft provide a decent tutorial for new users?".

  • by Jeremiah Cornelius (137) on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:46AM (#42314861) Homepage Journal

    In the end?

    Still tastes like chicken.

    Seriously. If this is the best language of encouragement that Ballmer can choke out of his throat, then you know there is a Vista-sized hole in Microsoft's delivery.

    I know! Why don't we all get used to Ubuntu Unity and Libre Office? "Even with the rumblings, we feel confident that it's a moment in time more than an actual problem."

  • by Captain Hook (923766) on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:51AM (#42314907)
    Those are Youtube tutorials by people unassociated Windows Development, their very existance reinforces the GP's comment about they needing to be an easier learning curve for a completely new way of interacting with a PC.
  • by NatasRevol (731260) on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:53AM (#42314935) Journal

    The fact that this is an article tells how poorly thought out some of their design decisions are.

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/2012202/how-to-shut-down-windows-8.html [pcworld.com]

    It's not difficult, but it's definitely not obvious or intuitive.

  • by LordLimecat (1103839) on Monday December 17, 2012 @11:54AM (#42314943)

    To be fair, I was pretty rabidly anti-metro about 2 weeks ago, and my dislike is waning a bit. I still miss the old start menu, and every time metro comes up i hit "escape", but the new search is OK and it seems like the use of RAM as cache is better this time around.

    "Getting used to" doesnt mean that Im happy that things changed, however. One "gets used to" a chronic health ailment; that doesnt mean youre happy that you got it to begin with, it just means youre learning to deal with it.

  • by Dcnjoe60 (682885) on Monday December 17, 2012 @12:19PM (#42315179)

    The Start Menu is still there. It's just full screen now. And you can fit more than 10 applications to launch on it (or fewer, if you prefer). I've read one complaint that the Start Menu hides the desktop, but I don't care about looking at the desktop when I'm starting a new app. Why would I? And the Start Menu still appears and disappears quickly.

    It really not much of a change if you stay away from metro apps (those are good for 'leisure mode')..

    There is no start menu. There is the metro page, but that is hardly the same thing. A start menu would mean that I could have a word document open on my screen and hit the start menu to open another app, without losing site of the word document that might actually contain the credentials I need to enter into the other program. With the metro page, you are jumping back and forth from entirely different screens and then scrolling looking for the proper square on the metro tab.

    Maybe that is more efficient on the Minority Report, but it in reality it seems much less efficient than click-click.

  • by tripleevenfall (1990004) on Monday December 17, 2012 @12:37PM (#42315319)

    No kidding. The business community stays with what works, until they have to move for a legitimate business reason. "New shiny touchy colory" is not a legitimate business reason.

  • by howardd21 (1001567) on Monday December 17, 2012 @12:51PM (#42315457) Homepage

    Seriously, I don't... I still have my keyboard from 1993 because these new ones stink.

    More seriously - I use my computer for work. Not kids, not watching videos, not games, WORK. Windows XP/7 is better at getting work done than Windows 8.

    Hopefully microsoft pulls their heads out of their butts on this and allows a quick setting change to "I have no use for metro, thanks."

    So do I - real work. I do not play games on a PC; prefer a 4:3 aspect if I can get it because no movies, etc. I do not even listen to music. But real work is generally done in applications like Word, Excel, AutoCAD, ERP, etc. Not the Windows operating system, but the apps loaded from it. Beyond loading an app, or managing files, what other real work is done in the Operating system? Very little. And I find Windows 8 about as good for that Windows 7. Plus it loads faster and finds printers nearby.

  • by ConceptJunkie (24823) on Monday December 17, 2012 @12:52PM (#42315459) Homepage Journal

    I'd say "That's not Microsoft, that's the government." except the government doesn't ask your opinion. They assume that because the country is ostensibly a democracy, you asked for it.

    Frankly, I don't understand Microsoft's strategy with Windows 8 unless they are laying the groundwork for Metro to become the only choice, instead of the clumsily-tacked on new default. Let's face it, the OS/Office money fountain is drying up, and MS is having a hard time breaking into new markets because they still think it's the 1990s and they can do what they want and everyone will accept it ("Yeah, it sucks now, but in a few more versions it will be good." doesn't cut it any more).

    That 30% cut Apple gets from every app sold probably looks like the only way to move forward. I'm sure MS wants everyone to get used to Metro and the apps it provides so they can start phasing out everything else over the next few years. Then they will have more of a monopoly than ever.... assuming anyone still uses Windows by then.

  • by Billly Gates (198444) on Monday December 17, 2012 @01:48PM (#42316083) Journal

    Seriously, I don't... I still have my keyboard from 1993 because these new ones stink.

    More seriously - I use my computer for work. Not kids, not watching videos, not games, WORK. Windows XP/7 is better at getting work done than Windows 8.

    Hopefully microsoft pulls their heads out of their butts on this and allows a quick setting change to "I have no use for metro, thanks."

    So do I - real work. I do not play games on a PC; prefer a 4:3 aspect if I can get it because no movies, etc. I do not even listen to music. But real work is generally done in applications like Word, Excel, AutoCAD, ERP, etc. Not the Windows operating system, but the apps loaded from it. Beyond loading an app, or managing files, what other real work is done in the Operating system? Very little. And I find Windows 8 about as good for that Windows 7. Plus it loads faster and finds printers nearby.

    You mean you never read a spreadsheet and want to research something you see like ACME sales 2009 while typing a report in Word? Or be working on autocad and think, shoot what did the customer request again and need to open word or IE/Chrome to take a peak without losing your screen of your drawing when referencing tiny details?

    Auto peak, snap, and side by side, are key Windows 7 features mixed with the instant search. What many ignorant slashdotters fail to realize is when you are presented with a start screen is it ruins your multitasking in your brain and destroys your attention span and train of thought. What if your drawing had 10 things you wanted to check briefly? You would forget them as the start screen would reset your attention span and would lose your drawing.

    By having your work still open and using search with translucent Windows and instant search you can be referencing something or having 2 things together and not lose your train of thought.

    The Windows 7 desktop is the best Redmond has ever made. You can access quick information FAST and still have your views protected with jimp lists and stacking. Stacking and jumplists for Windows 8? Silly that is what Metro is for!

    No I do not want to smudge my finger across my tiny 9 inch screen over and over like an autistic person in a cycle for each app opened! You can keep your Windows 8 desktop. Me? I am sticking with Windows 7. The best version ever made.

    FYI in Windows 8 when I type in "resume" I have to then cancel using the fast keyboard and go back to the mouse as it is too stupid to know the difference between power-settings and Resume-Chron-10-14-12! In Windows 7 I just hit the arrow key up or down in 1/3 of a second to differentiate. So much better and superior to Windows 8.

  • by squiggleslash (241428) on Monday December 17, 2012 @03:31PM (#42317185) Homepage Journal

    Given most corporate entities forced their users to use IE back when IE was a security and standards nightmare, why, exactly, would they change their minds now that recent versions of IE isn't significantly worse, either with security or standards compliance, than Chrome or Firefox?

    It's not exactly 1999-2006 any more. The world has moved on.

  • by Billly Gates (198444) on Monday December 17, 2012 @05:09PM (#42318645) Journal

    Wow that info is outdated.

    IE 10 != IE 6 by a longshot! It is the most caught up version of IE yet that supports HTML 5, CSS 3, and has great hardware acceleration and loads up sites as fast if not faster than Chrome. It is the only browser that is double sandboxed against hep spray attacks, as well as ASLR, and DEP.

    I am not an IE fan nor am I even using it right now (Chrome), but for using shitty ancient web apps optimized for IE 7 and IE 8 is it the only option. Also only IE is enterprise grade with .MSI and group policies and AD integration so you can manage 9,000 easily with different settings for different OUs and groups such as one for faculty, another for students etc.

    If you have a problem with this go harass Mozilla for not making Firefox enterprise friendly. Until that time comes we are staying IE only. With the later releases following standards and behaving like Chrome and Firefox it is not a big of an issue as it once was.

  • by Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) on Monday December 17, 2012 @06:15PM (#42319439)

    "New shiny touchy colory" is not a legitimate business reason.

    You have obviously never dealt directly with a CEO.

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