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Amazon Considering Buying Texas Instrument's Chip Business 108

Posted by samzenpus
from the sale-on-graphing-calculators dept.
puddingebola writes "From the article, "Amazon is reportedly in 'advanced negotiations' to acquire Texas Instruments' OMAP chip division, bringing chip design for its Kindle tablets in-house, and helping TI refocus on embedded systems. The deal in discussion, Calcalist reports, follows TI's public distancing from its own phone and tablet chip business in the face of rising competition from Qualcomm, Samsung, and others, though Amazon taking charge of OMAP could leave rivals Barnes & Noble in a tricky situation.'"
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Amazon Considering Buying Texas Instrument's Chip Business

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  • What? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Alwin Henseler (640539) on Monday October 15, 2012 @10:12AM (#41658143) Homepage

    Call me ignorant, but since when is Amazon a company that develops hardware?

    I know Amazon has a big catalog, but customized / re-branded products aside, aren't they basically a box-moving company? What the *** are they doing in the chip development business? More specifically: what do they expect to do, that a specialist like TI can't do for them?

  • by 0123456 (636235) on Monday October 15, 2012 @11:41AM (#41659515)

    Its not like you need to train on an ereader first before you buy a tablet. They're a fad , nothing more. In 10 years they'll be just another long forgotten footnote in tech history.

    Tablets may be a fad, but they will still be here in ten years.

    Oh, you meant e-readers? They exist because they're a fsck-load easier for most people to read on than a backlit LCD, and because losing a $60 e-ink Kindle when you leave it on your chair by the pool is much less disastrous than losing a $600 iPad where you stored all your login passwords.

    Not only that, but before long e-ink e-readers will cost less than a hardback book. At that point they become pretty much disposable items.

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