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Mexican Hotel Chain Outsources IT To US 125

Posted by samzenpus
from the backwards-day dept.
cweditor writes "Grupo Posadas has five data centers supporting more than 100 hotels and other lines of business, but it's moving almost all of those operations to a service provider in Texas. Could cloud service providers help the U.S. become a destination for tech outsourcing instead of an exporter of tech jobs? One stumbling block: The U.S. finds itself on the receiving end of protectionist legislation in other countries that discourages use of non-domestic IT service providers, says the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation."
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Mexican Hotel Chain Outsources IT To US

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  • Same staff (Score:1, Informative)

    by DoofusOfDeath (636671) on Monday July 30, 2012 @05:18PM (#40822443)

    With the U.S.'s non-enforcement of immigration law, the Texas datacenter could be staffed with Mexican citizens anyway.

  • Re:Blatant lie (Score:5, Informative)

    by Tridus (79566) on Monday July 30, 2012 @05:32PM (#40822555) Homepage

    Actually, it's not. The US government screams "protectionism" when other countries pass things like privacy laws that don't allow you to store private data outside the country precisely because of the US government's fondness for spying on everything. If you have to keep data private legally, it's a pretty bad start when a cloud provider shows up and can't explain why they won't have to hand a Canadian business' data on Canadian customers over to a US spy agency on totally arbitrary conditions.

    Sometimes the two aren't related, but sometimes they are.

  • by roc97007 (608802) on Monday July 30, 2012 @06:37PM (#40823243) Journal

    It's not the country. A "peggy" is a "peggy" if it's in Poland, India, Mexico or Ackerly.

    I think you missed the joke...

    I'm living the joke. Yes, I'm well aware that the current trend is for foreigns to use names appropriate for the country they're supporting. Some don't, and conversations go more like:

    "Hello this is Anantharaman, how may I be helping you today?"

    "Well, Aratha..."

    "Anantharaman."

    "Umm, Anaratharam..."

    "Anantharaman"

    "I'm just gonna call you 'Fred', ok?"

    The hardest part of a service call should not be communicating with the helpdesk.

If money can't buy happiness, I guess you'll just have to rent it.

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