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Arizona "Papers, Please" Law May Hit Tech Workers 1590

Posted by kdawson
from the don't-know-jack-boots dept.
dcblogs writes "H-1B workers and foreign students may think twice about attending school or working in Arizona as a result of the state's new immigration law. If a police officer has a 'reasonable suspicion' about the immigration status of someone, the officer may ask to see proof of legal status. Federal immigration law requires all non-US citizens, including H-1B workers, to carry documentation, but 'no state until Arizona has made it a crime to not have that paperwork on your person,' said immigration lawyer Sarah Hawk. It means that an H-1B holder risks detention every time they make a 7-11 run if they don't have their papers, or if their paperwork is out of date because US immigration authorities are behind in processing (which condition does not make them illegal). The potential tech backlash over the law may have begun yesterday with a call by San Francisco City Atty. Dennis Herrera 'to adopt and implement a sweeping boycott of the State of Arizona and Arizona-based businesses.'"
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Arizona "Papers, Please" Law May Hit Tech Workers

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  • by NewtonsLaw (409638) on Tuesday April 27, 2010 @07:49PM (#32006332)

    Whatever happened to "presumed innocent until proven guilty"?

    Has anyone else noticed that laws seem to be slowly changing to produce a presumption of guilt (requiring a proof of innocence) these days?

  • Quite reasonable (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Kelbear (870538) on Tuesday April 27, 2010 @07:50PM (#32006352)

    No worries, they would only would only stop people if they have "reasonable" suspicion. As long as you make sure you appear reasonably white you'll be fine.

    http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/mon-april-26-2010/law---border [thedailyshow.com]

  • by cosm (1072588) <thecosm3&gmail,com> on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:03AM (#32008946)
    Wie sagt man, ihre papiere bitte!

    Coming to a municipality near you. Welcome to 2010. Age of the guilty until proven innocent, malicious until proven benign, privatized profits, socialized losses. And more ridiculous, pointless, noneducational, and downright fucktarded news stories perpetuating the mass media every day. Hatemongering, blatant flaming with red this blue that labels, and social backtracking. Man I can't wait for the future! What wonderful things will the world bring us next!
  • by MacOSXHead (201757) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:07AM (#32008990)

    People should read the law first. They should not turn someone's hit seeking web article into anything important. Arizona resident's have very legitimate concern about the criminal activities of organized crime in Mexico.

    This is not a new story: http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/story?id=6848672&page=1

    If you do not like the law, change it... do not disobey it.

    I do not think that Indian, Russian, Chinese, etc engineers are really at risk of having their civil rights violated.

  • by tjones (1282) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:08AM (#32008998)

    Why let facts get in the way of a sensationalist headline?

  • by lena_10326 (1100441) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:12AM (#32009030) Homepage
    Given that you'll probably serve 3+ months in jail waiting to find out that you are indeed innocent still feels like a 3+ month prison sentence no matter how you spin it.
  • by BountyX (1227176) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:12AM (#32009042)
    I think you are misunderstanding that presumption. You are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Anyone can accuse you of any crime at any time. Being temporarily detained or arrested until get a trial, is NOT a presumption of guilt. You have the presumption of innocence in court becuase it is the prosecuting party that assumes the burden of proof for their accusation.
  • by Trip6 (1184883) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:13AM (#32009048)

    This law so clearly violates the fourth amendment that it will never hold up when the inevitable challenge comes in the courts. Some have predicted it will go all the way to the SCOTUS but I don't see it getting nearly so far.

  • by mveloso (325617) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:20AM (#32009124)

    I'm not sure why everyone's panties are getting bunched up. As the header states, Federal law already requires you to carry your visa around with you. People on H1B, tourist, and educational visas shouldn't have problems.

    The issue will really hit illegals and US citizens. Citizens generally don't carry documentation around with them. Illegals generally have no documentation, or fake documentation. There's really no way to tell a non-english speaking citizen from a non-english speaking illegal. What'll probably happen is something like this:

    Police: are you a US citizen?
    Potential perp: si
    Police: well then.

    In general, the police have better things to do than walk around randomly asking people for their papers. The law really just allows them to export illegal immigrant criminals to other jurisdictions, saving the state of AZ money.

  • by BountyX (1227176) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:21AM (#32009134)
    While your point is valid...I think the bigger issue with enforcment is how it effects the citezenry. Warning (here comes a hypothetical): What if you are a citizen but speak accented english, or you prefer to speak another language. A cop suspects you are an immigrant and demands immigration papers. Does the cop detain you at that point? Do you need to carry papers to prove citizenship on demand? Does this lead to frequent detention? It just seems unreasonable and ambigous to enforce something like this without encroaching the rights of citizens.
  • by DesScorp (410532) <DesScorp&Gmail,com> on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:21AM (#32009138) Homepage Journal

    Whatever happened to "presumed innocent until proven guilty"?

    Has anyone else noticed that laws seem to be slowly changing to produce a presumption of guilt (requiring a proof of innocence) these days?

    Non-citizens do not have all of the rights that a citizen does. And frankly, I don't see what the big deal here is. In most places in the world... the first world included... visitors are required to have documentation on them of some kind, be it visa papers or a passport.

  • by nobodyman (90587) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:23AM (#32009158) Homepage

    In the past this was true, but this law exists specifically to remove that stipulation. Please read the legislation [azleg.gov]. You may be stopped "upon reasonable suspicion that an entity is not legally allowed to live within the country".

    Perhaps you're confusing this with with the evidence criteria provision. The law says that race may be a factor, but it may not only be an only factor. Of course this is laughable -- people will be stopped for race, and cops will find (or create) additional evidence after-the-fact.

    It's telling that even the Arizona Association of Chiefs of Police [azstarnet.com] opposes this law, as they believe it will erode trust with immigrants and distract police from more serious threats.

  • by onefriedrice (1171917) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:23AM (#32009168)

    Whatever happened to "presumed innocent until proven guilty"?

    Has anyone else noticed that laws seem to be slowly changing to produce a presumption of guilt (requiring a proof of innocence) these days?

    As usual, the media has portrayed this bill according to whatever political slant the news outlets see fit. In reality, the Arizona bill is not much different than the federal law on illegal immigration (which obviously just isn't enforced). In particular, more than a few pundits are trying to portray this law as giving law officers the power to go door-to-door in search of illegal aliens to bust. In actuality, there is no such powers, and officers may only ask for papers if there is an altercation. In that case, since officers usually ask to see ID's of any involved persons during any dispute on the street, nobody should have a problem with the Arizona law unless they're trying to make a big deal out of nothing. Clearly, the reason this law is getting so much negative attention is because it makes the President look bad to have states enact laws to enforce federal laws that aren't being enforced.

    There are more points to the issue, though. The residents of Arizona overwhelmingly support it because the fact is (although many want to ignore this), illegal immigration is a big problem, economically and socially. As much as people like to avoid talking about this, a huge chunk of crime (especially violent crime) is caused by Spanish-speakers, many of whom are here illegally. I don't blame them! Or at least, I can see the problem they're in. Illegal immigration is akin to slavery, pure and simple. Humans deserve better, which is why this problem needs to be fixed. If nothing else, at least the Arizona law has made it an issue the federal government now wants to address.

    The simplest thing we can do to fix this problem is to make it easier to immigrate here legally. Talking about amnesty or anything regarding what to do about illegals who are already here is like bailing water without stopping to fix the hole. If it's easy to immigrate here, more of those who would be illegals become tax-paying, fairly-payed citizens. Then we can work to help illegal aliens who are already here find their way to the back of the line. The longer we wait, the longer this modern form of slavery is going to continue.

  • by krk28 (1799308) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:25AM (#32009188)
    don't be so sure. maybe you wish unsubstantiated statements like "clearly violates the fourth amendment" were the case, but there are just not. the 4th plainly and clearly protects us from "unreasonable" searches and seizures...as in one should feel protected from such governmental action in one's home or another place where one reasonably expects one's privacy. places like your car, the public street, or a police station interrogation room are not such places. the Constitution is not a series of court cases btw.
  • by DesScorp (410532) <DesScorp&Gmail,com> on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:25AM (#32009198) Homepage Journal

    En libertad, como los pajarillos.
    En libertad, que nadie me pregunte: a dónde vas?

    I believe this is the reason that Arizona has gone Nazi on illegal immigrants. Now New Mexico on the other hand has a state constitution that embraces the bi-lingual hispanic community. Maybe you should just move there.

    Arizona's new law largely mirrors existing federal law. The only people "going Nazi" are the hordes of activists that are violating Godwin's Law faster than the illegals that are actually crossing the border.

  • by Foobar of Borg (690622) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:28AM (#32009220)

    Non-citizens do not have all of the rights that a citizen does. And frankly, I don't see what the big deal here is. In most places in the world... the first world included... visitors are required to have documentation on them of some kind, be it visa papers or a passport.

    You seem to have missed the point that not everyone with brown skin in Arizona is an alien, legal or otherwise. Or, to put it another way, if I took my aunt who was born in Germany (but is now an American citizen) to Arizona, they are probably not going to stop her and demand to see her papers to prove that she is here legally.

  • by n2art2 (945661) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:28AM (#32009226) Homepage
    stop this non-sense of saying this has anything to do with guilt or innocence. That's for the courts to decide, and a prosecutor to prove, but it has nothing to do with the Police and their ability to detain, question, or stop you.

    If you don't like it move to Canada.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:28AM (#32009228)

    Kudos to Arizona. This law has always been here and it just hasn't been enforced. It has nothing to do with race either. I don't care if you're Mexican, Chinese, Canadian, German, British, Japanese, Russian, whatever...if you're here illegally then you need to go through the proper processes for becoming a citizen or LEAVE. Period. Our government should stop fearing its NON-citizens and enforce this!

  • by DesScorp (410532) <DesScorp&Gmail,com> on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:29AM (#32009244) Homepage Journal

    This law so clearly violates the fourth amendment that it will never hold up when the inevitable challenge comes in the courts. Some have predicted it will go all the way to the SCOTUS but I don't see it getting nearly so far.

    Good luck with that. This law largely mirrors existing federal law, which has been tested and found constitutional. The only hope you have of overturning it is, ironically, with a variation of the 10th Amendment; the argument that in this case, a state is usurping a federal role, not the other way around. The chances of this being tossed on 4th amendment grounds are nil.

  • by blowdart (31458) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:29AM (#32009250) Homepage
    Actually no. As an H1B myself we're supposed to carry the passport containing visa and the last entry we received when entering the country. I have a US drivers license, but that doesn't prove I'm here legally - after all my visa could have ran out. Now do I do it? No I don't, because the risk of being stopped and jailed is minimal compared to the risk of losing my passport, which is an even bigger mess. Even with a green card you're supposed to carry that around all the time, lose it and it's $290 to get another. And passport or green card loss leaves you ripe for identity theft.
  • by eloquent_loser (542470) <(moc.liamtoh) (ta) (resoltneuqole)> on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:31AM (#32009260) Journal
    I find it strange that the article doesn't discuss the implications for normal U.S citizens, i.e how do you prove you are *not* a H-1B worker? You can't tell a citizen from a non-citizen if neither of them are carrying anything. Obviously no-one who merely arouses the suspicion of police wants to be detained, therefore this constitutes a defacto requirement for every citizen to carry papers.
  • by causality (777677) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:31AM (#32009274)

    How is this a problem? By Law they are required to carry documentation with them, like a drivers license.

    Because it's so easy to demagogue.

    Any problem here is with the federal government, as enforcing immigration laws and taking reasonable measures to protect the country's borders is properly their job. As they have utterly failed to do this job, and their utter failure is causing many problems for certain state governments, one of those states is now trying to do something about it rather than ignoring it and continuing to have these problems.

    My bet is that the Feds aren't doing jack shit about this because both political parties benefit from the current situation. Republicans are allied with some corporate interests who view the illegal aliens as low-cost workers, while for Democrats, the joke is "they're not illegal aliens, they're unregistered Democrats." Both stand to lose those benefits if states start dealing with this. Both are powerful political and monied interests. That's why this has to be portrayed as negatively as possible with the most highly emotional rhetoric available. Certainly no critical analysis of this rhetoric will be allowed in the news, though it may appear in some editorial programs.

    Right now most of the problem of illegal aliens is coming from Mexico; at least in Arizona this is the case. Thus, these laws will mostly be applied to Mexicans who are here illegally or are here legally but failed to produce the paperwork. None of the people enforcing this law caused Mexicans to come here illegally. They are merely recognizing that this is happening and acting accordingly. Yet because Mexicans are a racial/ethnic group, and because the media eats this kind of shit for breakfast, this measure is being called "racist". It's pure bullshit.

    If we had many illegal immigrants from England, Spain, Mexico, and Canada, yet the immigration laws were only enforced against the illegal immigrants who are Mexican, that would be an instance of racism or ethnic discrimination. That isn't the case. Right now the problem is coming from Mexico and illegal immigrants from elsewhere are more like statistical error by comparison. Again, some percentage of Mexican citizens are responsible for that, not anyone who wrote or plans to enforce Arizona's new law. You'll practically never see such a common-sense recognition in the media.

    Really, people who think this is some horrible extreme law should take a hard look sometime at Mexico's immigration laws, or those of most other countries for that matter. There's an almost 100% chance that none of the highly emotional people screaming bloody murder about this have done so.

  • Re:So what? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by DesScorp (410532) <DesScorp&Gmail,com> on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:33AM (#32009288) Homepage Journal

    Yeah, let's be more like China.

    Or those repressive Canadians either. Or Germany. Or the UK. Or France, or.... I think you get it. The vast majority of countries require visitors to the their country to have documentation with them.

    Now, I've never thought "because others do it" is always a good reason for the US to adopt a policy. But in this case, this is just plain common sense.

  • by BudAaron (1231468) <`moc.skcehctentod' `ta' `dub'> on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:33AM (#32009300)
    It's about f...ing time My wife spent 5 years learning English and social studies in order to become an American citizen. It makes me crazy listening to the bleeding hearts complain about the horrible treatment being afforded people in this country ILLEGALLY!!!!!!!!!! Give me a break already!!!
  • by adelporto (104675) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:37AM (#32009336) Homepage

    So you're fine with being asked to provide proof of citizenship during a routine traffic stop? Keep in mind that your driver's license isn't proof of citizenship. Given that the US is a country of immigrants and therefore anyone and everyone looks like an immigrant, police can detain you until you prove that you are a citizen. You obviously don't care if that happens to brown citizens going about their day, because, and this is a wild guess, you're white and don't think this law would affect you, but think for a second about what that means if you happen to be protesting something the government doesn't like. Can't prove your citizenship? Detention for you.

  • by grouchomarxist (127479) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:48AM (#32009466)

    Do you carry your ID when you take out the garbage? While in a sento? Part of the problem with the Japanese law is that it doesn't make clear reasonable exceptions to this rule. If you are just outside your house without your ID will you be allowed to go back inside to get it?

    Also, what if you are a Japanese-citizen with non-typical appearance for Japanese? You'll probably end up having to carry ID to prove your citizenship. Same with the law in Arizona.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:49AM (#32009486)

    The same situation described in the parent can happen to a us citizen. Make a 7-11 run without your wallet and you can be asked to identify yourself, failing that, you can be detained for 48 hours while your identity is ascertained. Most LEOs would let good judgment prevail and let you get your wallet, but the potential exists. What remains to be seen here is how are these new LE standards applied? Is every immigrant stopped and questioned or is the tool only used when the LEOs "spidey sense" is tingling and (s)he has no other grounds to hold someone. There's obvious potential for abuse but there will also be instances where this tool can reduce crime.

  • by timeOday (582209) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:50AM (#32009492)

    they are not allowed to "suspect" you do to skin color, race, or country of origin...

    Driving While Black isn't a crime either, so I'm SURE minorities aren't subject to any extra traffic enforcement either... right?

    The law carefully avoids requiring a "REALLY good reason" by avoiding the words "probable cause."

    If it isn't based on skin color, what will it be based on? English competency? Off-brand tennis shoes? We already have Tom Tancredo calling for poll tests [denverpost.com]! Wow, next week it will be "separate but equal."

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:52AM (#32009512)

    "obvious" indicators such as race or language don't provide probable cause, as the US already has a huge number of 2nd-generation immigrants, and no official national language).

    Maybe it is time to decide between uto-aztecan or sioux so you can decide who is immigrant or native.

  • by jackchance (947926) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:52AM (#32009514) Homepage

    Getting arrested or detained does not make you guilty. You'll still have your day in court or clear things up at the station.Think of it like a beefed up curfew law for minors.

    Getting detained doesn't make you guilty, but you could lose your job for not showing up at work.

  • That depends on the state. Several states require that government-issued photo ID be on your person at all times.

    I'm not aware of any such state. I'm not even aware of any state that requires a U.S. citizen to have a government-issued photo ID. If you don't drive, you aren't required to get a driver's license, and if you don't exit the country, you aren't required to get a passport.

  • by www.sorehands.com (142825) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:56AM (#32009552) Homepage

    Most countries require you to carry papers when you visit the countries.

    I thought the Nazis were decried because of death camps, not requiring papers.

  • by nedlohs (1335013) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @12:59AM (#32009586)

    Legal immigrants will have papers - Federal immigration rules requires them to carry them anyway.

    Illegal immigrants are breaking the law in the first place, and yes this makes them being discovered more likely, but they should be worried already.

    Citizens on the other hand are not required to carry proof of citizenship and are not already breaking the law. They are the ones who are going to be impacted most (well if they look mexican...)

    All the brown skinned citizens should just not carry anything that identifies them as a citizen. I'm sure lots of lawyers will be willing to help them sue whenever they get arrested for not carrying their birth certificate/passport.

  • by still cynical (17020) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @01:00AM (#32009594) Homepage

    Non-citizens do not have all of the rights that a citizen does. And frankly, I don't see what the big deal here is. In most places in the world... the first world included... visitors are required to have documentation on them of some kind, be it visa papers or a passport.

    But what about non-visitors? US citizens don't carry birth certificates or passports with them every day, nor are they required to. So how do they prove their citizenship when stopped? Would they just be detained until they can have someone bring their passport to the local jail? No one seems too concerned with that scenario because of the unspoken assumption that anyone who "looked" like a citizen wouldn't be stopped. And that's where the concerns of discrimination come into play. I'm sure the vast majority of people who support this law are confident they won't be stopped and asked for proof of citizenship because they are "obviously" American. Of course, if they're wrong they're going to be very unhappy to find that a driver's license isn't even close to documentation of citizenship.

  • by GameMaster (148118) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @01:08AM (#32009680)

    Honestly, perhaps you should re-direct that anger to the people that have, actually, earned it (a.k.a. the Federal immigrations officials responsible for the back-log and the congressmen/women who haven't bothered to fund them adequately). If they were doing their job right, you wouldn't be having problems.

  • by DesScorp (410532) <DesScorp&Gmail,com> on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @01:14AM (#32009732) Homepage Journal

    " And in the U.S., permanent residents typically aren't hassled, at least until now. "

    And if that happens, you can blame three parties for that in the US; the federal government, which has to a great extent ignored the problem of illegal immigration, the politicians that want them to continue ignoring the porous borders, and the businesses that keep them coming because they don't want to pay market rates for labor. Don't blame the people who finally got fed up with coyotes leading columns of illegal aliens across their lawns at 2 in the morning. The states are acting now because the federals are not.

  • by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @01:14AM (#32009738)

    While I'm not at all a fan of this bill, what you are talking about is a completely separate issue. If the US has a fucked up immigration system, and it does, then it needs to fix it. The answer isn't just "Let's ignore problems because the system is fucked up."

    That is actually a large way that we've gotten in to the current mess with illegal immigration. A non-trivial amount of the population does not seem to want a solution, they just want to ignore things. They don't seem to want to forward solutions, such as streamlining the process, reducing costs, having work visas, etc, they just want to allow things to continue illegally. That is a bad situation. Fix the system, don't ignore the problem.

    So same shit here. There are reasons to be mad at Arizona about this law, but that because the federal government sucks at the paperwork is not one of them. The paperwork should be done properly and if ti isn't the feds are who to be mad at.

  • by snowgirl (978879) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @01:15AM (#32009744) Journal

    THAT'S ODD...

    The guy is talking about how a LEGAL alien can be here LEGALLY, yet not have any documentation.

    You seem to have missed his point?

  • by ArcherB (796902) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @01:22AM (#32009816) Journal

    They are stealing your time. I hope people can clog things up real good for this. Fight it every way you can. It's outrageous.

    I know. Seriously, what kind of law enforcement agency actually tries to enforce the law? What a bunch of dicks!

  • by DigiShaman (671371) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @01:36AM (#32009970) Homepage

    If you really love someone, you would not risk being caught by the USCIS engaged in a fraudulent marriage. Being that it's their job to be on the lookout for these, I can't for the life of me wonder why anyone would risk it. Fraud is a serious offense, and Achromatic should be bitch-slapped for even suggesting such a thing!

    Are there truly "I fell in love win %random% person while visiting the US" stories? Sure, it can happen. But you better damn well have a compelling case for the USCIS, or else you both risk losing a future together in America.

  • by Low Ranked Craig (1327799) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @01:42AM (#32010024)
    Sounds like you have a problem with the federal immigration system, just like Arizona does.
  • by causality (777677) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @01:51AM (#32010088)

    Non-citizens do not have all of the rights that a citizen does. And frankly, I don't see what the big deal here is. In most places in the world... the first world included... visitors are required to have documentation on them of some kind, be it visa papers or a passport.

    You seem to have missed the point that not everyone with brown skin in Arizona is an alien, legal or otherwise. Or, to put it another way, if I took my aunt who was born in Germany (but is now an American citizen) to Arizona, they are probably not going to stop her and demand to see her papers to prove that she is here legally.

    And if we had a big problem with literally tens of millions of Germans sneaking into this country by illegally crossing its borders, then maybe I'd see your point.

  • by Loki_1929 (550940) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @01:55AM (#32010136) Journal

    I don't think anyone disputes that current US immigration procedures and handling are pretty well screwed up. That, however, does not change the fact that we have 12 - 20 million people here illegally who are (per laws and policies) to be found and booted from the country. As our Federal government is more interested in granting amnesty to law-breakers in this area of the law than it is in actually enforcing the law, the state of Arizona has decided that it has had enough of what is - by any measure - a full-scale invasion.

    Ideally, I would like to see all our immigration policies and procedures overhauled so that everyone coming in legally is able to do so with as little trouble and expense as possible while everyone trying to come here illegally is either prevented from doing so or is quickly located and deported. Unfortunately, far too many in Congress want to tie making your life easier with giving tens of millions of illegal alien invaders amnesty and citizenship as a reward for violating our sovereign borders and ignoring our laws. Considering the fact that these illegal alien invaders are now kidnapping US citizens and have been raping and murdering our citizens en masse for decades, and considering the fact that the drug cartels from Mexico are now extending their wars across our borders, you're just going to have to wait until we can get the idiots in Congress to fix the legal immigration system.

    Your beef is not with Arizona, but with the US Federal government. It is not Arizona's fault that the Federal government is leaving you in limbo. It is not Arizona's fault that the Federal government isn't providing you with up-to-date status paperwork. You and I have two common enemies in this fight: the Federal government that's basically screwing you while leaving my country's borders insecured in the middle of one of the largest invasions in history and the illegal immigrants who are flooding into the country without bothering to go through the process you've been working with (because you apparently care about following the law and respecting this country - two concepts utterly foreign to illegals) who have forced Arizona into this position.

    If the citizens of Arizona weren't under constant threat from drug cartels and other criminal aliens, and if there weren't an ongoing invasion of the country that's overwhelming our social services and draining our economy, then I'd say we shouldn't resort to states doing things like this just yet as it's really the responsibility of the Federal government to fix things. However, we're under attack and it requires a more urgent response. We've been waiting for the Federal government to fix the problem of illegals flooding into this country by the millions for decades. It simply isn't happening. Now that our people are being kidnapped, taken away, murdered, etc on the verge of a full-scale drug war spilling into our streets, dealing with the illegals has become the overriding priority.

    You're in the immigration emergency room telling me your foot hurts. I got gunshot victims to deal with first. Will get to you ASAP. Want to improve your situation in the meantime? Get together with a whole bunch of other people who are in favor of fixing the immigration system without amnesty for illegals and get the Feds to fix their broken system. In the meantime, if you're a non-citizen in the US without documentation showing that you're here legally, ya might wanna steer clear of Arizona and several other states considering similar legislation.

  • by twostix (1277166) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @01:57AM (#32010150)

    Hoping over a border illegally is slavery??

    Good grief get some perspective.

    There's not a country on earth that doesn't have tight immigration laws, not even the western European "utopias" that the American left seems to think every country should aspire to.

    In France you can be arrested for even helping an illegal immigrant http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29899231/ [msn.com]

    In the Netherlands:
    "Who can ask for ID?
    The police, immigration and customs officials, tax officials, forest rangers, labour and environmental inspectors have the authority to ask to see your identification documents."

    Looks an awful like the law that Arizona just passed. Where was the condemnation and international outcry against the Dutch?

    Where is the faux outrage directed at Western Europes "Nazi" attitudes towards illegal immigrants?

    Arizonas laws are on balance about the same as most western countries regarding immigrants. Most western countries won't let *half* the people that the US lets in. Germany won't even let you in unless you have a "purpose" for being there, just wanting to live there isn't even *nearly* enough reason for them to give you a visa. Unless you already hold a job there and are being sponsored (hmm sounds familiar) or have family there don't even apply.

    Just like everywhere else on the planet.

    The Mexican government condemns Arizona, when Mexicos laws state:

    #A penalty of up to two years in prison and a fine of three hundred to five thousand pesos will be imposed on the foreigner who enters the country illegally." (Article 123)"

    And they want to talk about "Nazi" attitudes towards illegal immigrants?

    It's all nothing but the most absurd and disgusting two minutes of hate toward a traditionally conservative state for doing something that even the most left wing European states also do.

    The double think is breathtaking in it's depth.

    Can we get some perspective on this insanity?

  • by Moofie (22272) <leeNO@SPAMringofsaturn.com> on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @02:01AM (#32010186) Homepage

    "IMHO, the rights of the Constituion should only apply to citizens"

    Fortunately for all of us, the authors of the Constitution knew that this was a stupid idea, and specifically and explicitly constructed the document to disabuse people of this notion.

    But don't let the words on the page disabuse you of your humble opinion.

  • by Sancho (17056) * on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @02:11AM (#32010306) Homepage

    Are you an American citizen? If you were stopped in Arizona for a busted tail light, how would you prove that you were (assuming the answer is yes)?

    Of course the truth is, if you're not hispanic-looking and don't have a latino name, they probably won't demand that you verify your status. But amazingly, racism only a secondary problem. The main problem is that they may ask an American citizen to show proof that they are in the country legally, and Americans have no legal responsibility to carry that kind of documentation. So now what? Minor traffic tickets can be used to arrest people until they can provide a birth certificate?

    This is probably one of the most ill-conceived laws to come about in recent times.

  • by Quiet_Desperation (858215) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @02:17AM (#32010360)

    And I live in a pretty laid-back country, too (Finland). Arizona is just trying to enforce the existing law.

    For some reason the USA, alone in the world, is not allowed to have borders or exert any control with immigration like everyone else. I've looked very seriously into retiring overseas and, holy shit, some of the hoops you have to jump through even if you have money and skills on the particular country's most wanted list are amazing.

    The stupid thing is Arizona has been doing this for three years with no problems. The law just formalized it. The ruckus is made by people who live in little reality distortion bubbles and sit around in ideological echo chambers their entire lives. The law's passage and its farcical coverage by our piss poor, controversy fabricating, yellow news media raised it's profile past the threshold of awareness for the armies of idiots.

    Also, this is Slashdot where a small legion of tech geeks likes to pretend they are the rag tag rebels fighting the tyranny and the fascism they imagine infests their lazy, pampered and privileged Western existences.

    Sadly this is the level of public discourse in the USA. The allusions to Nazis or Soviet Russia come spewing out of the marching morons like projectile diarrhea at a salmonella festival. I guarantee anyone making such a comparison had not read the (easily accessed online) law. And it's not just babbling rhetoric. Many really, honestly do think Arizona has suddenly transformed into Nazi Germany. That's *really* the image they have in their ossified minds. And even if you prove otherwise, they will become *defiant* and even *proud* in their beliefs.

    The USA has become the Bizarro world, a parallel universe where every day it Opposite Day. We no longer have to wonder how deep the rabbit hole goes because we *are* the rabbit hole. We're a nation of Mad Hatters celebrating the un-birthdays while the truth sits in a dusty corner, withering away.

    So how are things in Finland? Not sure I'd like the weather, but I'm open to many things to get the hell out of this kingdom of eternal idiots. Seriously, this place is fricking doomed.

  • by ArcherB (796902) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @02:18AM (#32010380) Journal

    The kind that has jurisdiction, which is not the Arizona police forces.

    Why doesn't the Arizona State PD have jurisdiction in AZ? Are you saying that state laws and US laws are mutually exclusive? You mean if there is a federal law against murder, then there can't be a state law against murder? If there are federal taxes, then there can't be state taxes? Please, explain to me why an AZ State Trooper wouldn't have Jurisdiction in Phoenix?

  • by Loki_1929 (550940) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @02:29AM (#32010474) Journal

    If you believe the police in the United States are "the local gestapo" who simply "pistol whip" people on a whim, it's probably past time for your medication. When your persecution complex is muted by the Aripiprazole, we'll look at the reality of the situation.
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .

    Alright, so if you're a US citizen who believes the police may have reason to suspect you're in the country illegally, you have a few options to avoid any issues. First and foremost, a driver's license works wonders. If you're driving a vehicle, you have to have one of those anyway. If you simply don't drive at all - ever, and don't want/need a driver's license, you can get a state-issue ID for little or no cost. Either should be perfectly sufficient to resolve any questions from law enforcement.

    However, it's more likely that most cops are going to know pretty quickly if you're someone they need to check. If you don't speak English, that's probably a good place to begin. If you get pulled over and don't have a license or other ID (which is, itself, a problem), then that's kind of a clue too. If you take off running when they say 'Hello', that'd also be a good starting point.

  • by countertrolling (1585477) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @02:34AM (#32010528) Journal

    There are more respectful way to upload the law. This new rule is quite the opposite. One of those ways might be to go after the tax cheating employers that hire them. But the government wont touch the major offenders. They simply have too much clout. A law that disrespects me will get no respect from me either. My obligation is defeat this by any means possible. It is corrupt law.

  • by pipedwho (1174327) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @02:51AM (#32010664)

    The problem is that we've made criminals a protected class in America for so long that they have more rights than legal citezens. IMHO, the rights of the Constituion should only apply to citizens. Unfortunately, that's not the way it works anymore.

    That's not the way it ever worked.

    Criminals are not a protected 'class', and the constitution has never applied ONLY to citizens.

    In fact, beyond the obvious loss of rights that happens to someone when they're incarcerated, the government doesn't suddenly have a legal reprieve to ignore the constitution. Think for example the 8th Amendment regarding "cruel and unusual punishment". How would that make any sense if all of a sudden the constitution ceased to apply once you've been convicted. Could you then be punished "cruelly and unusually"?

    At the time that the US Constitution was written, there was no universal requirement of citizenship. In fact the word citizen wasn't even mentioned in the constitution until the 14th Amendment was added nearly 100 years later.

    The US Constitution is probably one of the most noble documents ever written. And the denial of rights, or the selective application of its laws, is anathema to the entire purpose of its text.

  • News for Nerds? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Jack9 (11421) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @02:59AM (#32010706)

    This is not a political blog. Please keep these topics (medical, political, etc) off the frontpage. If it's on the frontpage news, we don't need it repeated here.

  • by street_astrologist (1522063) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @03:23AM (#32010826)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wXkI4t7nuc [youtube.com] Fast forward to about 3/4's through. An experienced cop admitting that when he followed a car long enough he could make a legal stop because at some point everyone makes a mistake. (I presume feeling nervous that a cop has been following you the last 8 blocks also doesn't help one's situation.)

    True. If this happens to you, pull over and walk away from the car as soon as possible before you do commit that violation.

  • Re:News for Nerds? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by shutdown -p now (807394) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @03:37AM (#32010918) Journal

    You must be...

    Wait. *looks at ID*

    So... how many times have you posted this request already?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @04:56AM (#32011356)

    > Honestly, perhaps you should re-direct that anger to the people that have, actually, earned it

    The people who support this byzantine monstrosity (AKA Republicans who required the department to be self-funding)?

    Will do.

  • by JackieBrown (987087) <dbroome@gmail.com> on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @05:01AM (#32011380)

    If Arizona is just enforcing the fed law, tell me how they can enforce it EQUALLY and I mean non-racially. Would they ever stop this girl and ask for her papers? Would they ever stop me and ask me for mine?

    If either one of you was stopped for any of the reasons allowed in the bill, they would be asking for your driver's license no matter what color your skin is.

    It is amazing watching the democratic complain about republicans talking about "death panels" and then watching them yell that every Mexican is going to be attacked on the the streets.

    Look at the comments here against the bill" [facebook.com] compared to for the bill [facebook.com]

  • by edumacator (910819) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @05:06AM (#32011414)

    They CANNOT walk up to a random person on the street and check their immigration status.

    You must not know a lot of cops. What you are saying is technically true, but if someone who appears to be Hispanic, and they swerve ever so slightly in their lane, the cops can and often will stop them for that minor infraction, so that they can check their status. The cops I know in Georgia don't do this for immigration purposes, but if you drink a few beers with them, they'll admit to stopping Hispanics because they have a higher likelihood of carrying drugs.

    Laws like this are meant to give the police HUGE latitude in stopping someone. They are also targeting a group that doesn't have the wherewithal to hire a good lawyer to invalidate the original stop.

  • by sg_oneill (159032) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @05:41AM (#32011624)

    It's far easier to just arrest all the brown people.

    Considering the mass move away from the republicans by conservative hispanic voters due to the nutty racist shit coming out of the likes of Tancredo et al, which played a large part of the republicans nosediving in the last election, on top of the fact that the republicans seem hellbent on scaring the hell out of almost everyone with the batshit crazy teaparty stuff, do you ever get the feeling the republicans are TRYING to create a "permanant democrat majority".

    The funny thing is, considering the widespread perception of innefectiveness thats dogged Obama, it wouldn't actually be too hard to win the next election, except for the fact the republicans seem hell bent on totally alienting the all important hispanic vote (think florida!) , and somehow seem to have taken away from the last election that they where not right wing enought, I doubt they'll be able to capitalize on that.

  • by daniorerio (1070048) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @05:57AM (#32011708)
    Because in this case bringing your US drivers license isn't enough for a H1-B immigrant, you'll need your passport and visa plus documentation. Bringing that all the time is quite a hassle, not to mention annoying if for example you go barhopping and lose the damn papers.
  • by MartinSchou (1360093) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @05:59AM (#32011718)

    There IS a reason to be upset with Arizona for this law. They are punishing people for something they cannot possibly fix or even rectify. It's not as if the Arizona state legislature doesn't know this is an issue.

    Imagine this situation:
    You're arrested for whatever trivial reason. The phone system is down, so you can't get to call your own lawyer, so you're assigned a court appointed one. Once in court, your lawyer suffers a stroke, but the court don't want to waste its time arranging for you to get another lawyer, and not only convicts you of whatever you were arrested for, but also holds you in contempt of court for wasting its time because your lawyer had a stroke.

    You have no way of influencing the things that get screwed up. Same with the green card system. You apply in time, you're told that while they're working on it, you can stay, but you have no paperwork showing they're working on it, so you can be arrested and deported (to Mexico? who will then deport you to somewhere else for not having a VISA). Now you've been arrested and left the country, so your green card might not be approved. And it will make it impossible for you to come back.

    So yeah ... a state deciding to punish the victims of Federal incompetence is quite immoral. What next? Jailing and deporting women who have been kidnapped, raped and transported to a foreign country against their will to be sold off as sex slaves? Oh ... right ... maybe Arizona's taking a page out of the Danish rulebook.

  • by MartinSchou (1360093) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @06:15AM (#32011804)

    You see the ER was packed with illegal immigrants who did not have insurance

    Question: Where did these illegal immigrants get money for stuff like food and clothing?

    Are they ALL thieves, drug dealers and such? Or do they possibly work (illegally) in the country? Why aren't anyone punishing the employers who are enabling these illegal immigrants? Why aren't you throwing them in prison for violating the law? Conspiracy to break the law at the very least. Aiding and abetting a criminal.

    Change these charges from misdemeanors to felonies. Throw the responsible parties in jail (including the illegal immigrants), from foremen to CEOs, single citizen hiring maids, gardeners, nannies etc.

    It's supply and demand at work. There's a demand for illegal immigrant workers, because they're cheaper. No need for insurance, lower salaries all round - they aren't going to be paying tax, so you can cut that away from their salary, you can press their salary even more, because they won't complain about working 12-16 hours a day, because that can get them deported etc. And since there's a demand for these workers, and a natural amount of replacement due to deportation, there will be a massive supply of these illegal immigrant workers.

    What is the punishment for hiring illegal immigrant workers at the moment? Is there any kind of punishment at all? As long as it is not only cheaper to hire them, but still cheaper even when you get caught red handed hiring them. Essentially you have a law stating that it is illegal for radioactive waste being stored in kindergartens, but you're just moving the waste and not giving a rats ass about who put it there in the first place. No wonder you have a problem.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @06:30AM (#32011894)

    In particular, more than a few pundits are trying to portray this law as giving law officers the power to go door-to-door in search of illegal aliens to bust. In actuality, there is no such powers, and officers may only ask for papers if there is an altercation. In that case, since officers usually ask to see ID's of any involved persons during any dispute on the street, nobody should have a problem with the Arizona law unless they're trying to make a big deal out of nothing.

    I don't know about which demented world you live in, but in the United States you are not required to present identification documents simply because someone asks for them, even if the person asking is a police officer investigating an incident. There have been numerous lawsuits about this in the past because, unfortunately, most police officers aren't even aware that they do not have the legal authority to compel citizens to produce identification papers. This is not Soviet Russia, after all. If you want recent examples you can look at the case of Deborah Davis in Colorado, Eric Rachner in Seattle, and Michael Righi in Ohio. As it turns out, police frequently arrest people for asserting their right to not produce identity papers, and then quickly find out that they're in the wrong. The only thing sadder than that is that most Americans have been brainwashed into believing that they have to comply with anything a cop asks them to do, and will roll over for the man in a heartbeat. Isn't it great to live in a free country (unless you live in Arizona, of course).

    But what is a far bigger problem with the Arizona law is that it gives citizens the right to sue law enforcement agencies for not enforcing the law aggressively enough. How many lawsuits do you think will end up being filed because someone complained about a house full of alleged "illegals" and the cops didn't come and arrest them all? How much time, money, and effort will end up being wasted defending these cases in addition to the civil rights cases filed by people stopped under this new law?

  • by Totenglocke (1291680) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @06:39AM (#32011934)

    If Arizona is just enforcing the fed law, tell me how they can enforce it EQUALLY and I mean non-racially.

    Again, we have people getting mad when one ethnic group is the primary cause behind a problem and then people (naturally) pay more attention to them to try to stop the problem.

    Yea, it sucks that you're Hispanic and actually a legal citizen. However, millions and millions of Mexicans (including the Mexican government who aides them in entering the US illegally) scream "FUCK YOU!" to taxpayers in the US daily. I'm well aware that there are people of other races who are here illegally, but the overwhelming majority of illegals are Mexican (due mostly to the horribly insecure border we have with Mexico).

    If you want to get it to where race is no longer an issue for checking on if you're illegal, then instead of being one of the legal immigrants who defends illegals, be a legal immigrant who campaigns AGAINST illegals and work towards fixing the problem, not attacking those who are trying to fix the problem just because (due to bad luck of how you were born) you might get hassled some while working to fix the problem.

    In AZs case, I have to not only avoid drawing suspicion, I have to carry docs - just in case I get pulled over.

    Actually you only have to carry them if you're planning on committing a crime (since they can only check your status if they've already been given a reason to get involved over a crime). As for getting pulled over in a car? Everyone, regardless of race of citizenship status, is supposed to have that in their car at all times.

  • by d3ac0n (715594) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @06:42AM (#32011940)

    Perhaps Arizona wouldn't feel the NEED to enact such laws if the Federal Government would DO THEIR JOBS and enforce immigration law.

    As it stands right now immigration law is intentionally not being enforced for political purposes. IE: to allow as many illegal immigrants in as possible, so that they can be granted amnesty by Democrats registered as Democrats and vote Democrat, thus granting the Democrat party POWER in perpetuity.

    America is a nation of LAW. That is the meaning of having a Republic rather than a Democracy. When one party (regardless of which one!) takes control of the Federal government and proceeds to flaunt the law for their own political and power gaining ends, then the law is meaningless, and the Federal Government ceases to exist as a legal authority. It is then up to the member States of the Union to uphold law themselves, until the Federal Government can be brought back under control. AZ is simply following the founding principles and I cheer them on.

    Incidentally, Utah is now considering a similar law. Expect to see many many states consider and/or pass similar laws, and pity the people in states that do not, as they will be swamped with illegal aliens and the crime that comes with them.

  • by clarkkent09 (1104833) * on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @06:55AM (#32012036)
    The point is that the law essentially doesn't give any major new powers to the police except to enable them check somebody's immigration status when they are dealing with that person anyway. There used to be a common and ridiculous situation where a van full of obvious illegals, no ids, no english, would be stopped and as long as they weren't caught in the act of crossing the border and as long as the driver had a valid license, the cops couldn't do anything. Yes some cops abuse their powers, but they do that anyway. That's a separate battle.
  • by betterunixthanunix (980855) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @07:03AM (#32012078)
    Land of the free indeed.
  • by Anzya (464805) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @07:14AM (#32012132)

    The problem is of course if the police only arrest someone for instance jaywalking if they look "foreign".

    Equality in the eyes of the law does not just mean that different people gets the same punishment for the same crime. If you have to be black or look foreign to even get arrested then that is just as wrong.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @07:16AM (#32012146)

    I live in Connecticut. I see your perspective and experience; so here is mine.

    I've been involved in a hit and run and had another vehicle stolen and stripped in the past 4 months alone. To the best of my knowledge, it has nothing to do with illegal immigrants. While CT is a border state and illegal immigrants without doubt swim in regularly from Canada or Bermuda across the Atlantic Ocean, I seriously doubt building a big fence around the state or passing tougher immigration law would significantly change the situation here. I think that tougher immigration laws are more of a band-aid for a symptom rather than a real cure for the problem.

  • by E IS mC(Square) (721736) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @07:46AM (#32012336) Journal
    You know that H1B holders also mostly do have other ids (like state ids or driving license), right? But according to this law, it wont be sufficient for them.

    I sure hope you are part of minority, because this law is nothing but a redneck reaction in disguise of a law.
  • by TimSSG (1068536) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @07:46AM (#32012344)
    FYI: Each state has the rights to decide some issues related to what is needed to get on there state ticket for presidential election. Tim S.
  • by commodore64_love (1445365) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @07:50AM (#32012368) Journal

    On the other hand:

    - States have a right to militias, and they are entitled to protect their *own* borders from invasion from without. At the time it was envisioned as a way for State Governments to act when invaded from a neighbor *New York invades Pennsylvania) or from the west (British or French troops invading Ohio). The States needed to act instantly, using their own resources, rather than have to wait for US troops to mobilize.

    In the present, Arizona's border is being invaded from the south by Mexican militias that are stealing and *murdering* Arizona citizens. They are merely trying to protect themselves, first by passing laws to arrest the invaders, and second by mobilizing their militia (cops).

    This is no different than if the EU State of Poland mobilized its laws and cops to protect itself from militias from Russia. Poland has that right. So too does Arizona.

  • by Lakitu (136170) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @08:05AM (#32012492)

    I left something out of my original reply.

    You see the ER was packed with illegal immigrants who did not have insurance and were using it as a clinic to treat the flu, common colds, strep throat... stuff you take to a regular Dr. So the facilities tax payers have contributed to so its there in the event of an emergency is over-run. A nurse came outside after a half hour and walked us around to a side door where they finally treated my sons foot.

    This little passage shows just how easily it is to abuse a law like this, and how quickly it will happen. How do you know these people were in the country illegally? Did you ask them all? Did you check their papers? How do you even know what's wrong with them? If you can so quickly diagnose them all with the common cold, then perhaps you should get a job working at that hospital, because you're a fucking genius with some kind of magical powers. If it's really that easy, then they wouldn't be clogging up the ER, since the people staffed there would be able to treat them just as quickly as you did.

    You are putting yourself above other people in this country and using legality of immigration or color of skin as a justification. Thank god not everyone is like you, and the country's system of government gives everyone equal protections under the law.

    You "sincerely hope" that the law will be abused. What a joke! I sincerely hope that you go fuck yourself and stop thinking you are more deserving than everyone else.

  • by eggoeater (704775) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @08:12AM (#32012566) Journal

    This is no different than if the EU State of Poland mobilized its laws and cops to protect itself from militias from Russia.

    Actually it is very different. We are the f'ing USA; we have a constitution and a supreme court that specifically says this type of action (arresting/detaining people without probable cause) is illegal and a violation of civil rights.

    It will be a short matter of time before this law is declared unconstitutional. I have no problem with the State of Arizona trying to deal with the immigration problem, however rounding up and detaining people is way WAY out of line, and making people carry their papers at all times or else go to jail is repugnant.

  • by dkleinsc (563838) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @08:36AM (#32012780) Homepage

    An experienced cop admitting that when he followed a car long enough he could make a legal stop because at some point everyone makes a mistake. (I presume feeling nervous that a cop has been following you the last 8 blocks also doesn't help one's situation.)

    It's definitely nervewracking, I can tell you that. I've been in that very position, not because I was non-white but because my car was a bit beat up and I had longish hair at the time, and I'm pretty sure the cop had decided that I didn't belong in his small suburb.

    The basic picture: I saw the cop start to pull up behind me, and I was going about 40 in a 30 mph zone (which everyone else does too: it's a rural area that has no business having a speed limit so low), so I slow down to 35. The officer continued to pull up behind me, and I slowed to the speed limit. I gave him opportunities to pass just in case he was just trying to get by me, which he didn't take. I took a somewhat less direct route out of town, following every traffic law to the letter (including things like signaling 100 ft before a turn) and making a few turns. He followed me every step of the way until I left his jurisdiction.

    Now imagine having to drive like that all the time, and you'll know what a Hispanic person in Arizona needs to do to avoid getting stopped.

  • by jeff4747 (256583) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @08:46AM (#32012878)

    How exactly is this a bad law?

    Two problems:

    What does an illegal immigrant look like? How would a police officer decide when to demand papers and when to not demand papers? As far as I can tell, the supporters of this law want all Hispanics to be checked, but they don't think it will inconvenience the white folks. You do realize we have a good number of illegal immigrants from Canada and Europe, right? In addition, the only way to enforce this law while not violating Federal anti-discrimination laws is to make EVERYONE show their papers.

    However, the big problem is what papers are we supposed to show? I'm a US Citizen. My ancestors arrived in North America in the 1600s. I do not carry any proof of citizenship around with me, as a Driver's License is not proof of citizenship. Carrying around my birth certificate or SS card would be really dumb, since that would expose me to identity theft. In addition, there's no good way for the cop to determine that it's not a forged birth certificate or SS card.

    The theory of this law is that the police can properly identify immigrants from citizens. That is simply not the case. And since we constantly reject the idea of a "national ID card", citizens do not have any "papers" to show.

  • by jeff4747 (256583) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @08:52AM (#32012936)

    That's still the wrong target for your anger.

    If you are upset about illegal immigrants, your anger should be directed at the people who hire them.

    The illegal immigrants would not be here if there were no jobs for them.

  • by Jawn98685 (687784) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @08:52AM (#32012940)
    Oh, my. Where to start with addressing your ignorance? Might as well be at the beginning, I guess...

    It is pretty damned obvious by now to anyone with a brain that the feds aren't gonna do jack shit about illegals, and as anyone who has lived in one of the border states can tell you illegals are turning the towns into war zones!

    Hyperbole much? Jeezuz, you make it sound like lead is flying down every street in every border town. Not that there isn't a serious problem going on, but it's the "war on drugs" that's failing here, and BTW, it's not "immigrants" who are doing the shooting. It's smugglers and organized crime. AZ's new "show uz ze papers" law is going to do exactly dick to solve that problem.

    Lets be honest here folks...having a wide open border is the biggest clusterfuck of our century!

    Can't argue with that, other than to point out the practical impossibility of shutting down thousands of miles of border. Or did you have some heretofore unheard suggestion on how to do that? Nah, didn't think so.

    ... anyone who has been in one lately can tell you the ERs are looking at 12+ hour waiting lines thanks to illegals using them as clinics (and of course never paying so YOU get to pick up the bill on your insurance),

    Though it's been a few years since I retired, as a paramedic I spent a fair amount of time in ER's, certainly far more than you have, and I'm fairly certain most of the people sitting in the waiting room with non-emergent complaints (those who are using the ER as a "clinic") are U.S. citizens who have been kicked to the curb by the rest of our fucked up health care system. You're right about one thing though, the rest of us have to pick up the tab for every runny nose that get's treated in an ER instead of a more appropriate venue (that would have cost a tiny fraction of that ER visit).

    just look at the crime rates for places like Phoenix, the towns are becoming warzones!

    No points for repeating yourself. Besides Phoenix isn't a border town. Neither are L.A., Detroit, N.Y.C, Boston, Atlanta, etc., but those towns damn sure have places where it isn't safe to be unarmed and alone. I suppose now you'll tell us that it's just a different color of hoodlum in those cities and that they're all the problem and we should get rid of them next.

    So until the fed gets off their pandering asses and actually does something about the borders the states are gonna have to step up. If you don't like it, don't go there! That is one of the nice things about having 50 experiments in democracy, if you don't like one state's laws you are free to move. As someone whose state (AR)...

    Why am I not surprised.

  • by ControlsGeek (156589) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @09:24AM (#32013286)

    This allows the police to deny access to an attorney for 'some time' merely by stating that they suspect that the person is an illegal immigrant.

  • by lena_10326 (1100441) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @09:29AM (#32013358) Homepage

    It is pretty damned obvious by now to anyone with a brain that the feds aren't gonna do jack shit about illegals, and as anyone who has lived in one of the border states can tell you illegals are turning the towns into war zones!

    Yes. It's a failure of the federal government to act. The response should be to bring troops home from the middle east and militarize the southern border to Mexico to bring law and order back to the border towns.

    illegals naturally hate cops (because they are illegal themselves, duh!) so criminals in their neighborhoods can do whatever they want without fear of being turned in

    That's an irrelevent point because there is gang violence in northern and north-eastern major cities (such as Seattle, Chicago, New York, etc) yet the illegal mexican population there is substantially lower. (In new york, the hispanic population is mostly legal cuban and spanish--not mexican.) The majority of illegal mexicans are ordinary families raising children--not hardened criminals. (Yes! Think of the children!)

    anyone who has been in one lately can tell you the ERs are looking at 12+ hour waiting lines thanks to illegals using them as clinics (and of course never paying so YOU get to pick up the bill on your insurance),

    You say they are using ERs for clinics. True, but by implication that means they are merely seeking basic care that clinics handle such as treatment for colds, infections, minor cuts and scrapes, etc. You know.. the cheap stuff. Why not provide that care in the form of an actual daytime free clinic? (Provided 1st paragraph is done 1st). The cost would be 10 to 20 times cheaper than what we're paying now. They're gonna scam the system anyway right? We either get hit with $1500 ER bills or $100 doctor visit bills. Let's take the cheaper option. Oh wait--that would mean implementing basic universal health care. Crap. We can't have that can we?

    just look at the crime rates for places like Phoenix, the towns are becoming warzones!

    See 1st paragraph.

    So until the fed gets off their pandering asses and actually does something about the borders the states are gonna have to step up. If you don't like it, don't go there! That is one of the nice things about having 50 experiments in democracy, if you don't like one state's laws you are free to move. As someone whose state (AR) is starting to get flooded by illegals frankly I'm sick of it.

    Meandering digression skipped.

    I've known too many folks that have gotten seriously injured by illegals driving without insurance (because they are already breaking the law, what's one more?).

    Why not legalize them and convert them into tax paying citizens so that they can drive legally? Have you seen the national debt obligations lately? Almost $79 trillion (or put another way 1 year's GDP for the entire planet!). That's $254,545 (=70b/308m) per citizen. Don't forget only half the population pays taxes via a paycheck. We need the mexicans to grow out of this financial mess. Besides, you know we're going to be legalizing them anyway. Deporting them all will never fly. Even the most radical rightwing republican recognizes that.

    And with double digit unemployment I'm really fucking sick of jobs like construction, which used to be filled by hard working Americans that actually paid taxes, going to illegals because they will work for peanuts and send their money back to Mexico.

    Solved by legalizing existing illegal workers which puts them on our tax collection and thus on equal par with american workers. That combined with the enforcement of existing laws and pushing through penalties on violating corporations will tighten that leaky faucet.

    Hell it is so fucking bad here that guys yell "Immig

  • by commodore64_love (1445365) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @09:49AM (#32013652) Journal

    Poland is part of the EU, and they too have a constitution (Treaty of Lisbon). You mean to tell me you think Poland has to just sit on its hands, even as Russian militias are streaming over its eastern border? It has to sit their and do nothing while the EU Parliament gives pretty speeches???

    Hell no. And neither does Arizona. BOTH are sovereign states and BOTH have the right to protect their borders.
    .

    >>>this type of action (arresting/detaining people without probable cause) is illegal and a violation of civil rights.

    (1) Looks Mexican or Arab or Chinese or Russian
    (2) Has Mexican or Arab or Chinese or Russian accent
    (3) Can not prove he is a U.S. citizen because he doesn't even have a drivers license. (Who doesn't carry a drivers license, or non-driver ID card???)

    QED Probable cause to believe he is a foreign national has been established, and the arrest may occur. Now the courts will take-over and determine whether or not he actually is American or an invader, and follow due process of law. That's how our world operates.

    Or:

    Would you prefer that we just let people like Bin Laden or Mao Tse Spy cross our borders, and have free rein to wander anywhere he feels like wandering, causing destruction along the way? These invaders are KILLING American citizens along the border, and you don't even want to TRY to stop them. You just want to turn the other cheek.

    If I was in Arizona I'd certainly expect my government to act to protect me. Today is NOT a good day to die.

  • by AndersOSU (873247) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @10:16AM (#32014078)

    What troubles me about the law isn't that it requires people suspected of wrongdoing to prove their citizenship, it is that it requires police to determine citizenship status in "any lawful contact".

    That means if you witness a crime, but you speak with an accent the cop taking your statement is required to ask you about your citizenship. If you are the victim of a crime and here illegally you cannot report it in Arizona without being deported.

    Everyone should stop and think what that means. Do we really want violent crime to be not reported because it's perpetrated on people who aren't here illegally? And good luck finding a witness if you're jumped in a Home Depot parking lot when only day laborers are present.

  • by IICV (652597) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @10:42AM (#32014604)

    As it stands right now immigration law is intentionally not being enforced for political purposes. IE: to allow as many illegal immigrants in as possible, so that they can be granted amnesty by Democrats registered as Democrats and vote Democrat, thus granting the Democrat party POWER in perpetuity.

    Errr... how, exactly, do you know this is going to happen? You do realize that granting amnesty to all illegal aliens is basically politically impossible, right? Further, even if it does happen, it won't have that much of an effect; even if you assume that all illegal aliens who are granted amnesty vote, and vote Democrat, the following will happen in the next Presidential election:

    • 3 million more people will vote Democrat in California, which will profoundly change how that state votes except for the part where it won't.
    • 1.5 million more people will vote Democrat in Texas, which would be just barely enough to tip a Presidential election assuming nobody actually cares that we just granted amnesty to 1.5 million illegal immigrants.
    • 1 million more people will vote Democrat in Florida, which will give the Democrats more of a lead there
    • Half a million more people will vote Democrat in Illinois, New York, Arizona, New Jersey and Georgia, which might just barely tip Arizona and Georgia over to the Democrats but won't matter to the other states because they're already Democrat.

    Beyond that, the numbers get small enough that they won't really affect state elections significantly more than a well-crafted ad campaign.

    So basically, your conspiracy theory consists of the Democrats expending a metric shitload of political capital (which they have so much of, now that health care's just barely scraped by) in order to grant amnesty to illegal aliens, and then with those extra now-legal alien votes they'll win Texas and Florida, but only if the local Republicans are completely retarded and don't campaign on the fact that there's a ton of scary brown people who can vote now. If the Republicans can't leverage something like this into a massive voter turnout that far exceeds the Democrat's gains, they don't deserve to be a political party.

    And this is assuming that all illegal aliens will vote (they won't; I'd expect to see only moderate turnout - after all, it's not like a minimum wage employee can just take off to go vote, no matter what the law says) and that all illegal aliens will vote Democrat (they won't; at least a few of them hold conservative views).

    It honestly sounds like this conspiracy theory of yours is just your way of internally justifying your racism. There's basically no way what you say could come to pass, and if it did come to pass the results aren't what you think they would be, but in the mean time it means you can hate brown people as much as you want because they're part of a scheme against you.

  • Stupid argument (Score:2, Insightful)

    by phorm (591458) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @10:44AM (#32014642) Journal

    You know, I hear this argument fairly often, and I still consider it really f*cking stupid. I'm from Canada, but we hear the same B.S. here, so let's get a few things straight:

    a) There were no immigrations laws at that time. You can't be illegal if there's no fucking laws to break.

    b) Yes, lots of terrible things happened, it doesn't mean that every "white man" shot a dozen indians in order to make claim on the "new world." Some did, but saying that all did is like saying all Germans are Nazis.

    c) My ancestors moved here quite sometime after the early colonial days. They weren't trapping beavers and shooting natives, they came as legal immigrants to help do thinks like work mines, build railroads, etc

    d) I work born in my home country, again legally, as a citizen.

    So how the hell would you classify me as an immigrant? Also, as many people here have stated, it's not immigrants that are the problem (hell, my GF is one), it's illegal immigrants that functions as part of an essentially "underground society" because they aren't supposed to be there. This law unfortunately may have some affect on non-illegals too, which is the part that is stupid and sucks (and needs to be fixed, IMHO), but we don't need to bring the "white man who killed and pillaged" arguments around to deal with that.

    Seriously. I have never to my knowledge harmed any indigenous person, but some people expect me to pay and/or feel guilty for it. While indigenous people's may warrant some support for those events that occurred, I myself deserve neither the debt of blame, guilt, nor any other exorbitant costs associated with such.

  • by AndersOSU (873247) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @10:53AM (#32014838)

    Ciudad Juárez is arguably the most dangerous city in the world. There were over 1500 murder there last year. Ciudad Juárez and El Paso are a single urban area with a border running through it. El Paso is the third safest city in the US.

    So yes, a rancher was killed by cartel members - that's tragic, but this nonsense about violence spilling over the border is, well, nonsense.

  • by plague3106 (71849) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @11:53AM (#32016000)

    I'm not sure where in the Consitution it says states may enforce federal laws if they believe the feds aren't doing it. I do see a part that says only the feds may make laws about immigration though.

    Your last statement just seems to be racist fear mongering. Do you have states on the breakdown of murders? Or are the dirty wetbacks just a convient scapegoat for a police force which is lazy and inept (as they all pretty much are)?

  • by DrgnDancer (137700) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @11:58AM (#32016088) Homepage

    You carry your birth certificate with you at all times? Or your passport? Those are the only two documents you list that prove citizenship or legal status. Neither a military ID nor a driver's license is considered a proof of status. I carried my military ID around for years, but still had to provide a birth certificate, Social Security Card, or Passport as proof of legal right to work when I got a new job. I was a National Guardsman, so I changed employers several times while still carrying a military ID, and it was never once accepted as proof of citizenship (not surprising, non-citizens can be in the military. We had a Brit in our unit. He eventually got US citizenship, but was a legal resident for the first two or three years of his service. He couldn't get a clearance until his citizenship went through, but not all jobs require them).

    That's the problem here. Actually, there's two problems. Requiring someone to show any form of identification without a their being a suspect in a crime or otherwise falling somehow under the jurisdiction if the police is wrong, and generally one of the things we see in over the top satires of authoritarian states ("Youa paapas, plaeze!"). That a US state should make it a matter of course for law enforcement to ask citizens for proof of citizenship lest they face arrest would be comical if it wasn't depressing. The *secondary* problem is that proof of citizenship is actually a pain to carry.

    Your Social Security Card says right on it that it should be kept in a safe place, not carried. Your birth certificate is probably a fairly large and cumbersome document to lug around (not to mention that it should also be kept in a safe place), and Americans are not required to possess Passports unless they plan to travel abroad. What do you suggest US citizens of Mexican decent carry to prove their citizenship? Driver's license isn't proof. SSC and birth certificate shouldn't be carried. Passport they may or may not have and are not legally required to have.

    Who the law is aimed at is completely immaterial to who it may affect. One could reasonably argue that legal residents have to carry a green card. It's a pain, but one could make a reasonable argument, that it's a burden they bear for living in a country not their own. The fact that there is absolutely no way to externally tell the difference between an illegal Mexican immigrant, a legal Mexican immigrant, and a US citizen of Mexican decent creates a dilemma though. The citizen should not be required to carry proof of citizenship, but without such proof how do you know he's a citizen? If this was a rare and unusual use case, it might not be that bad, but there are hundred's of thousands if not millions of US citizens of Mexican decent in Arizona.

  • by CraigoFL (201165) <slashdot.kanook@net> on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @01:06PM (#32017418)

    Yes some cops abuse their powers, but they do that anyway. That's a separate battle.

    It seems to me that you should end that battle before you give one of the belligerents a shiny new gun to play with.

  • by Dr. Gamera (1548195) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @02:39PM (#32018932)

    There used to be a common and ridiculous situation where a van full of obvious illegals, no ids, no english, would be stopped and as long as they weren't caught in the act of crossing the border and as long as the driver had a valid license, the cops couldn't do anything.

    "Ridiculous"?! I find this to be a common and sensible situation.

    The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Prediction is very difficult, especially of the future. - Niels Bohr

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