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MS — Dropping IE6 Support "Not an Option" 374

Posted by kdawson
from the die-already dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft wants to see IE6 gone as much as anyone else, but the company isn't going to make the decision for its users anytime soon. The software giant has been pushing IE6 and IE7 users to move to IE8 ever since it arrived in March 2009, but it's still up to the user to make the final decision to upgrade: 'The engineering point of view on IE6 starts as an operating systems supplier. Dropping support for IE6 is not an option because we committed to supporting the IE included with Windows for the lifespan of the product. We keep our commitments. Many people expect what they originally got with their operating system to keep working whatever release cadence particular subsystems have. As engineers, we want people to upgrade to the latest version. We make it as easy as possible for them to upgrade. Ultimately, the choice to upgrade belongs to the person responsible for the PC.'" Of course some big Web sites aren't waiting for Microsoft. Reader Yamir writes, "Google's Orkut, a social networking service popular in Brazil and India, has started warning IE6 users that the browser will no longer be supported. Just last month, YouTube started showing a similar message."
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MS — Dropping IE6 Support "Not an Option"

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  • by girlintraining (1395911) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @03:34PM (#29028169)

    I don't want to upgrade from IE6 for one very simple reason: I think the interfaces of the later IE versions suck donkey balls.

    • by Brian Gordon (987471) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @03:48PM (#29028457)

      I don't want to upgrade from IE6 for one very simple reason:

      It is impossible to finish this sentence logically.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by dhavleak (912889)
      I wouldn't call that a simple reason. More like a simplistic one..
    • by amicusNYCL (1538833) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @03:55PM (#29028611)

      Move beyond the interface, please. The interface is not the end-all-be-all of a piece of software, it's just one of the features. IE6 is so deficient in today's browser market that continuing to use it just because you don't want to adjust to a new interface is frankly doing a disservice to yourself. You're sacrificing a ton of legitimately beneficial features in order to keep one that is arguably useful in the first place. I mean, tab support alone is a reason to ditch IE6. I thought the interface for IE8 was a little funky the first time I saw it but now, even though I never use IE to do any decent browsing (only for occasional testing), when it opens up the interface does make sense to me. The navigation buttons are clear, the menus are where they should be, and anything that I can't immediately find is almost always in one of the menus in the new customizable toolbar. It's also very easy to customize which buttons or menus go in there.

      Seriously, you're doing yourself a disservice by using IE6. If you insist on using IE instead of a more capable browser like Opera, do yourself a favor and give IE8 a month or so to adjust to. Your web developer friends will thank you.

      • Honestly, I prefer the interface in IE 6 even a bit more than I do Firefox. Heck, really the only reason why I stopped using IE 6 (this was a few years ago, before IE 7 was past beta) for Firefox was that I wanted to eventually convert to Linux and wanted to make sure that I could use the browser. And really, IE 7+'s interfaces simply fail, everything is oversized and it seems to go terribly with XP, especially if you are using the classic theme. I use Firefox mostly because of its similarity to IE and ease
    • Are you talking about the buttons in the toolbar or the fact that most web pages start rendering differently (or what some might call "correctly").

    • by cbhacking (979169) <been_out_cruising-slashdot@yahoo. c o m> on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @04:04PM (#29028829) Homepage Journal

      FYI, IE8 allows people to put the buttons back where they were in 6. Both 7 and 8 allow you to permanently show the menu bar, if you want. The new Command Bar in 7 and 8 can be turned off, as can tabbed browsing (no idea why you'd want to, but you can).

      Out of curiosity, are you still using Windows 3.x because you also think that the Start menu "suck[s] donkey balls"? Have you even seriously tried to use the new interface, with or without customizing it? Most people seem perfectly comfortable with it.

    • by croddy (659025)
      the basic interface of the GUI web browser has not changed appreciably since NCSA Mosaic, for crying out loud. you have a URL bar with some buttons on the left and maybe some buttons on the right, and a display pane for the page itself below that. i can't even begin to guess what you think is so different between MSIE 6 and MSIE 7/8 and Firefox and Chrome and Safari. they're all the same basic interface. and in the details where MSIE differs, it's easily the worst of the bunch.
  • Windows 2000 (Score:5, Informative)

    by avandesande (143899) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @03:36PM (#29028203) Journal

    What is missed is that IE7 will never be offered for windows 2000- so IE 6 support is tied to Windows 2000 life cycle.

    • Also for internal Enterprise apps. Where I work, I can think of 3 important internal apps that do not work 100% with IE7 or IE8. The company won't roll out IE7 or IE8 because it's cheaper just to stay with IE6 than it is to modify or replace those apps. Windows Vista or 7 is the same story - nobody wants to spend money just to keep up with Microsoft's release schedule.

    • by Petaris (771874)
      Good thing firefox works on Win2k. I believe that Opera does as well and probably others. This is probably more of an corporate / institution (edu, gov, health care, banks) thing though. Some where that they need to use IE6 for some specific reason that is not easily dealt with. Like some web based, or partially web based, software that requires it. I know that many would say just upgrade the software but sometimes thats not feasible for some reason (cost, dependencies, etc.).
  • what? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Lord Ender (156273) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @03:36PM (#29028207) Homepage

    The first link is about MSFT's logo, not about IE6. What am I missing here?

  • by DamnStupidElf (649844) <Fingolfin@linuxmail.org> on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @03:37PM (#29028219)
    Come on, Microsoft, if you're trying to end-of-life an operating system that's actively being deployed on Netbooks, what's the problem with turning off support for IE6?
    • by heffrey (229704)

      Well I think the point is that ie6 is tied to xp and so shares the same long term support lifecycle. Just because ms won't sell you a new licence for xp doesn't mean that they won't continue supporting and patching it. You don't need to be a genius to understand that.

    • The problem is that *until* they EoL XP, they can't EoL the browser that XP ships with. In other words, they are trying to EoL IE6, but can't for the same reason that they can't EoL XP - it's still being deployed and used! This is not that complicated... once they can get rid of XP (something they've been trying to do for years), they'll probably drop support for IE6 the same day (why support one component of an entire OS that is no longer supported?).

      • by liquidsin (398151)

        why not release xp sp4 that upgrades the browser to ie7 or 8 or whatever? then they can eol ie6 and not worry about shelving xp just yet.

  • by NecroPuppy (222648) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @03:38PM (#29028233) Homepage

    Since we rarely upgrade software here until it's officially EoL'd, that MS isn't dropping this means no real chance for IE 7 or 8 for another year.

    Which means I have to explain to the using class why their browser at work looks different from the one at home. Somehow, "It's a different version" only sinks in for about a week; after that, it's passed through the other end, and they have to be reminded again.

    • by elrous0 (869638) *
      Sounds like you're working at a real cutting-edge company. I used to work at one of those too. They would still be using Novell Netware 4 if I hadn't made them upgrade.
  • 95/Me/2000 (Score:3, Interesting)

    by f1vlad (1253784) * Works for Slashdot on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @03:38PM (#29028239) Homepage Journal
    Of course not, what about Windows 95/Me/2000 users? One of those systems cannot run IE7 if I recall correctly.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by elrous0 (869638) *
      You can have my 486 running Windows 3.1 when you pry it from my cold, dead fingers! It was good enough for 1994 and it's good enough now!
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by f1vlad (1253784) * Works for Slashdot
        Absolutely, not arguing that :) my friend, almost like you, is still running Win 95 from home; on top of that he's hosting tiny personal web server on that machine. He spends his spare time (for fun) patching and making sure that machine is secure.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by amicusNYCL (1538833)

      Something tells me that anyone running any of those OSs is not real concerned with whether or not their software is up to date.

  • Well... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Jugalator (259273) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @03:41PM (#29028299) Journal

    I'm pretty sure that Microsoft are *happy* that these websites are dropping support and guiding their users in the right direction. That'll make things easier for Microsoft to move forward too. They put their focus behind Internet Explorer 8 now, and of course want to do that. But I can understand their stance -- their customers would raise hell if they just plain made an exception from their product lifecycle policy for the web browser, that just happens to be among the most used products in Windows there is.

    So all in all, this feels like a non-story to me.

  • I can't find any engadget.com pages, but I did find this.

    Microsoft: "dropping support for IE6 is not an option" - Ars Technica [arstechnica.com]

    Also, Engineering POV: IE6 - IEBlog [msdn.com].

  • by nz17 (601809) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @03:45PM (#29028391) Homepage

    I have to tell you, IE8 runs horribly on my desktop computer. When I installed XP over 2000, I upgraded right from 6 to 8 and hated it. The startup time was ridiculous, something like 30 seconds or 60 seconds, and opening a new tab took just as long as starting a new instance of IE8. Even after starting it once, starting it again wasn't must faster. That's my reason that I "downgraded" Internet Explorer to version 7, which really was an upgrade from version 8 in terms of performance, starting in about 3 seconds instead. I suppose that I can't be alone in this - there must be others for whom 7 or 6 runs better than 8 for whatever reason.

    I know as far as I'm concerned IE7 fixed a lot of bad things with Internet Explorer that made it a big difference over 6, whereas 8 just seems to be an incremental improvement over 7 that really should not be pushed by Microsoft as a Critical Update. MS is probably coming out with frequent updates like this now just to try to stay competitive with Firefox and Safari and Chrome. I know that the Steam Overlay browser which embeds IE's Trident engine certainly got a speed boost from me going with 7 over 8, and that's the way it's going to stay unless and until Microsoft releases something newer for me to try on Windows XP. With Vista and soon Windows 7 out in retail, I don't think anything else is coming for XP users though.

    Good thing I don't even use Internet Explorer as my primary browser then. Long live my mighty combo of Firefox, Opera, and Konqueror!

    • by AndrewNeo (979708)

      When I installed XP over 2000, I upgraded right from 6 to 8 and hated it.

      Wh..what? That means you had to have just upgraded to XP some time this year..

    • by dave562 (969951) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @04:56PM (#29029753) Journal
      Let me get this straight. You did an in place upgrade of 2000 to XP? If so, that's the reason your computer is slow and the performance sucks. You're obviously using an older computer given that you were running 2000 on it, and given that limitation, XP isn't going to be the fastest OS ever. The UI should be faster than 2000 but you probably won't be able to run as many apps simulatenously. You can't really make a reasonable comparison between IE6 on a fresh Win2K install versus IE8 on an in place upgrade of XP. Do a fresh install of XP, then install IE8 and it will run better.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by nz17 (601809)

      Due to a number of questions and assumptions that arose due to what I suppose was my lack of explicitness, I shall try to clear the water here:

      I didn't upgrade to XP from 2000 sooner because...
      1) The default XP GUI sucks.
      2) It's more of a resource hog than 2000.
      3) You have to deal with activation and Windows Genuine Advantage.
      4) XP wasn't really a good choice until SP2 came out, as SP2 combined with the earlier advances of SP1 to address many issues that XP suffered from.
      5) I wasn't going to pay for a new v

  • they would simply stop accepting the browser at ALL OF THEIR SITES. If they did that, nearly all of the rest of the world would follow suite. NOBODY in the development world wants this demoniacal abortion. BUT, while MS continues to accept, then everybody else is forced to accept it.
    • by Monkeedude1212 (1560403) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @03:54PM (#29028599) Journal

      But they aren't trying to KILL IT, they just want it to DIE.

      Like you're rich Uncle.

    • by British (51765) <british1500@gmail.com> on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @04:16PM (#29029055) Homepage Journal

      "ithey would simply stop accepting the browser at ALL OF THEIR SITES."

      Except for that one site that lets you upgrade to IE 7 or 8. That would be an important one.

      • by truedfx (802492)

        A couple of years back, I did a clean install of Windows 98, which came with Internet Explorer 4.0. It crashed on just about everything, including Microsoft's update site, Mozilla's download pages, and Google. I had to go through old magazine CDs to get it updated to something usable.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by WindBourne (631190)
        That is a good point. You know, it is almost a shame that somebody does not develop a virus that installs MSIE 8 and deletes MSIE 6. It seems like it would be a great use for a virus.
        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by smellsofbikes (890263)

          That is a good point. You know, it is almost a shame that somebody does not develop a virus that installs MSIE 8 and deletes MSIE 6. It seems like it would be a great use for a virus.

          I think it's called Vista.

    • (Well, slower than it already is.)

      If software or a service stops working... people get pissed. They will be mad at the manufacturer or service provider.

      But we expect computer systems to get slower over time. If software or a service just gets gradually crappier and crappier performance... eventually people will get annoyed and switch or upgrade, but they'll assume that it's just "business as usual."

      Another option is to add a lot of links and features that are only available in IE8. If the basic thing con

  • My company works with several 3rd party vendors* who are locked into IE6. They haven't even ported their software to IE7, much less 8.

    It's horrible. The good news is a couple of those 3rd party vendor programs do work in firefox.

    *yeah, yeah. I know. It's a horrible business practice, but the good news for us and them is we're a rabbit's whisker away from dropping them for additional vendors.

  • Yeah, sure it was great for MS to support a product that was made obsolete 3 years ago by the release of IE7, and then doubly-obsolete by the release of IE8.

    Do people really expect product support for a release of software 8 years old that has been superseded by two version upgrades? I hope not. Especially since they got it for 'free' with their operating system. (Ha!)

    • I had to reread the headline and summary, and the headline again to make sure. IE6 has been deprecated and should be dropped, but it is still being supported? I think I am suffering from cognitive dissonance. [wikipedia.org]

  • by Gadgetfreak (97865) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @03:59PM (#29028691)

    I suspect that's the case for many people, at least in the US. It's on my company PC, which I have no control over. The scary part? I work for a gov't contractor. A big one. And the IT people have no interest whatsoever in trying something new.

    Even my 11 year old laptop, which is still alive, runs FireFox on Win98. Not very quickly, mind you, but faster than it ran IE.

    For reference, it's a Gateway (Gateway 2000 at the time) original Pentium 200 MHz "MMX" with 48 MB of RAM. And it only has a 10-base wired ethernet card anyway, so it's not like browser speed matters much.

  • Small, flaming rings (Score:3, Interesting)

    by NeverTheMachine (1612583) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @04:02PM (#29028781)

    I find it sad that a decision by a single company can create small, flaming hoops for the Internet to jump through. I'm happy that the browser (r)evolution we're experiencing is helping this, though. With all this sudden competition, it's not only forcing the browsers to whip up into Interwebs standards but also get rid of the monopoly that Microsoft has over the browser market. Hopefully, we'll never be at this strange crossroads again. Gogo capitalism!

    Hell, I'm amazed Microsoft doesn't just annoy the IE6'ers into submission. That doesn't seem out of their league.

  • by QuietLagoon (813062) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @04:07PM (#29028877)
    As engineers, we want people to upgrade to the latest version. We make it as easy as possible for them to upgrade.

    .
    Quite to the contrary. Microsoft makes it very difficult for users to upgrade to the latest version. FireFox and Opera both still support the current versions of their browsers on Windows 2000. Yet Microsoft had dropped Windows 2000 from their list of OS's supported by their newer browsers long ago, even when Windows 2000 was supported by Microsoft.

    Have you ever wondered why all the other browser developers can support Windows 2000 while Microsoft is completely unable to? I mean, if the Microsoft engineers say they want to make it easy for people to upgrade, then I'm sure there must be some fundamental technical issue with IE that stymies the engineers, and prevents them from doing what they say they want to do. What is the problem that prevents Microsoft from bringing newer versions of IE to Windows 2000?

    • "What is the problem that prevents Microsoft from bringing newer versions of IE to Windows 2000?"
      The answer to that question doesn't have to be any harder than "Because some executive decided it shouldn't be done".

      I do suspect, though, that the reason could be a bit more technical. Since IE is (according to all statements by Microsoft) an integral part of the operating system, it can be dependent on various things being present, and will not work correctly without these. The differences between the var
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by tukang (1209392)

      What is the problem that prevents Microsoft from bringing newer versions of IE to Windows 2000?

      The problem is that they want people to upgrade to the latest version ... of Windows :)

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by ragefan (267937)

      Have you ever wondered why all the other browser developers can support Windows 2000 while Microsoft is completely unable to?

      Its not that Microsoft is "completely unable" to support W2K, its that they choose to not spend resources supporting it. In doing so, they are attempting to force customers to pay to upgrade to a newer (supported) version.

      Meanwhile, Mozilla and Opera are choosing to support W2K in order to gain market share for their browsers from customers that are choosing not to pay Microsoft to upgrade their OS. This provides them with the benefit that if the user likes it, if and when they decide to upgrade, then they

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by jrumney (197329)

      Have you ever wondered why all the other browser developers can support Windows 2000 while Microsoft is completely unable to? I mean, if the Microsoft engineers say they want to make it easy for people to upgrade, then I'm sure there must be some fundamental technical issue with IE that stymies the engineers, and prevents them from doing what they say they want to do. What is the problem that prevents Microsoft from bringing newer versions of IE to Windows 2000?

      Microsoft actively tries to make it difficult

  • by sam0737 (648914) <samNO@SPAMchowchi.com> on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @04:16PM (#29029059)

    Think about that...

    Ubuntu LTS is to be supported for 5 years, but only with limited backported software, not even the most important software package like major upgrade of gnome, firefox, open office are always available in the backport repro.

    while Every release of Windows is LTS, and as long as 10 years! Also, new core software upgrade are usually offered even after a long time. (IE8, Live Messenger 9, Office 2007 on XP, a 6 years old product!)

    On Linux? Even if you get the source, the chance of compiling the latest software bits on a 6 years old box is unlikely...Either kernel updates are needed, or glibc, or missing libraries, or the dependent libraries needs new GCC...usually end up upgrading GCC+Glibc+Kernel+whatsoever to get some new software. Or to put it simply, either spend a few days to figure that out, compile and install the dependencies else where, or to upgrade the distro.
    Hey but I just want that new software, but keeping all my old software and configure...they didn't break and I don't want to touch them.

    Besides unstable hardware support, I have been using Linux for 10+ years and this is the single thing that I hate most...when will debian package support libraries of different version installed side by side...?

    Think about it...I think Microsoft is really doing an excellent job here. Although DLL Hell induced problem sometimes do happen (but a lot less since XP...), but still when they are still adding new features for a 6 years old OS. What else can you expect?

    • Gentoo does it (Score:3, Insightful)

      by jonaskoelker (922170)

      when will debian package support libraries of different version installed side by side...?

      I haven't used Gentoo, so I can't tell you much about it, but I hear that this is one of its features. I think they call it "slots", fwiw.

      What else can you expect [of Microsoft]?

      Catching up with the 80's user interface goodies? Alt-drag to move windows, virtual desktops, sloppy focus, clicking on a window doesn't raise it (probably in order of usefulness).

      Also, including basic tools in the OS, such as loopback mounting, sha1.exe, file(1)/magic, a shell with tab completion that doesn't suck donkey balls (meaning the one I'm used to), an editor t

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Rennt (582550)

      How was this modded insightful? For starters, the main reason to use a LTS release is BECAUSE they do not upgrade core components. This is meant to appeal corporate customers. If you want the latest software, you can set automatic upgrades of the WHOLE OS every 6 months - for free no less. So take your pick.

      Secondly, installers from third party vendors (with the exception of hard-core database stuff) don't care which distro you are using at all, much less which version.

      Finally, debian DOES support differen

    • by RAMMS+EIN (578166) on Wednesday August 12, 2009 @12:16AM (#29033453) Homepage Journal

      ``Ubuntu LTS is to be supported for 5 years, but only with limited backported software, not even the most important software package like major upgrade of gnome, firefox, open office are always available in the backport repro.

      while Every release of Windows is LTS, and as long as 10 years! Also, new core software upgrade are usually offered even after a long time. (IE8, Live Messenger 9, Office 2007 on XP, a 6 years old product!)''

      On the other hand, you can upgrade to the latest version of Ubuntu free of charge.

      As for having the latest software on an old version of Ubuntu, I believe it is actually a feature that they don't do that. Keeping the software versions the same throughout the lifetime is the best way to ensure that what works today will work tomorrow. If you want newer software ... you can get the free upgrade.

      So, all in all, comparing Windows and Ubuntu, both have their advantages.

  • by PineHall (206441) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @04:53PM (#29029717)
    Microsoft's Office Web Apps team [msdn.com] is supporting only IE7, IE8, Firefox, and Safari (on Mac). IE6 is not supported. I am not surprised.
  • They didnt gave a choice to users when installed by default that. Then they forced users to depend on it promoting/giving away/etc technologies (ActiveX anyone?) and (their own twisted definition of) "standards" tied to IE6. But even them had to recognize that it was wrong, security hell and that broke half of internet. Now they wash their hands, and keep their trapped/tied/addicted to IE6 users that way because "oh, they have the choice" instead of try to help them to break that dependence (a "fix" that co
  • " We keep our commitments" OMG thats a knee slapper....

    MS swore up and down that IE6/Mac was just around the corner and was almost done.. and then one day *bam* capped in the head.

    How about 'Plays for sure'. (the irony on this one is beyond belief.)

  • "The software giant has been pushing IE6 and IE7 users to move to IE8 ever since it arrived in March 2009"

    Pushing is an understatement. Last time I checked, it was a critical security error (red warning icon on the taskbar) to have not installed their browser.

  • Legacy Software (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Orion Blastar (457579) <orionblastar@noSPAm.gmail.com> on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @06:19PM (#29030819) Homepage Journal

    For the same reason companies don't want to upgrade to Windows Vista is the same reason why they don't want to upgrade from Internet Explorer 6.0, legacy software.

    I can tell you as a programmer analyst for the past 17 years that when developing a web application for Internet Explorer that each new version change will wreck legacy software written for an earlier version of Internet Explorer. Not only does the VBScript and Javascript engines change, put also the ActiveX files you used for controls will change as well and stop your client code from working.

    Since the Dotcom bust of 1998, companies have been trying to save costs by sticking to legacy software and only fixing bugs and making the code more secure rather than upgrade to newer versions. They learned that by being cutting edge, it tends to bleed a lot of money out of the company for lost productivity waiting for a fix, paying high priced developers the money to upgrade the code or rewrite it for the newer platforms, sometimes even contracting out the work to the lowest bidder (usually meaning offshoring the work to another company with cheaper labor) in an effort to try to save on costs.

    Windows 2000 and lower won't run IE7 and up, so companies are forced to upgrade hardware as well as software to get to Windows XP and beyond. Soon XP support will be gone and then it will be Windows Vista or Windows 7 and whatever comes after Windows 7 (Windows 8 we assume?) and IE9, IE10, etc.

    Microsoft makes money by changing how things work and then charging for training and certification on that new technology as well as selling books, etc to explain how to upgrade to the newer technology. Any company that does this ends up spelling millions of dollars every three years just to upgrade, and by the time they do upgrade a new technology was released that stops the upgraded code from working and they have to start all over again to rewrite the code yet again.

    For example, many companies just updated web code to use IE7, and then IE8 comes out and wrecks everything. Now they have to rewrite it again, and in three years when IE9 comes out, they start all over and do it again.

    It would be cheaper to just use non-Microsoft standards like Java, Python, C++, etc on Linux or a Non-MS operating system that doesn't change how things work every three years or so. But companies are locked into Microsoft solutions that are ever changing.

  • A few ideas (Score:3, Insightful)

    by renegadesx (977007) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @07:12PM (#29031477)
    Ive never seen a fresh XP SP3 so I honestly dont know. Was IE7 part of SP3? If not cant IE8 be part of SP4? That way IE6 support dies when XP SP3 (or 2 if they did include IE7 in SP3) support dies.

    That is a way of doing it. Until then web designers should get tough, just because Microsoft cant drop 'support' for IE6 doesn't mean that websites are tied to that support contract at all. They can easily do a browser check and anything that reports IE6 (or earlier, there are 98 and 2000 machines out there) the server can simply redirect them to a page that links to browsers web sites (Firefox, IE8, Chrome, Safari etc).

    Google seems to be the biggest supporter of this move and they can make a major contribution as Google search engine, Gmail and YouTube are all very popular products. Sites like Facebook and Twitter can also have that sort of influence.
  • "working"? (Score:5, Funny)

    by toby (759) * on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @07:26PM (#29031635) Homepage Journal

    Many people expect what they originally got with their operating system to keep working

    If IE6 "works," I'm not keen to see how they define "broken."

  • by rnturn (11092) on Tuesday August 11, 2009 @11:40PM (#29033271)

    Upgrade the browser to be more standards compliant and keep IE6 compatibility and the browser winds up being huge. And probably a pain in the rear to use. And probably a security nightmare as well.

    Or drop IE6 compatability and break untold numbers of corporate intranet web pages that were written to and depend on the broken IE6 model. And the corporations whose internal applications that just broke because IE6-mode was removed are the same corporations that you want to upgrade to Vista and/or Windows 7.

    Not a great choice.

    Tick off those corporations and after they re-engineer their internal web sites to be usable with something other than IE6 and they've done a good chunk of the work necessary to think about changing the corporate standard desktop OS as well. I imagine there will be some companies that will wonder "Why the hell are we sticking with this software, anyway? Look what it just cost us to clean up the internal web sites!" Or... companies will keep things as they are when the new IE retains the IE6 behaviour. But I'm betting that they can count on there being an increasing amount of grumbling from the employees who have to use external web sites and cannot render web pages properly with Microsoft's bloated browser. The corporate IT folks will have to standardize on a desktop that includes a non-MS browser that one can use for the external sites that are written according to accepted standards and IE that they need to use for the broken^Wnon-standard pages that were developed internally.

    I wonder how many newly trained web programmers will want to continue writing around IE6 quirks and for how long.

    It'll be interesting to see how this pans out.

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