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The First 100 Dot Coms Ever Registered

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  • Why? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:15AM (#21559623)

    What was interesting to me is that it took 2 years just to get 100 domains on-line.
    Why is that interesting? I'm not even sure if this 'internet' thing is going to catch on ...
    • by exley (221867)
      Whether or not it catches on we shall see on the road ahead.
    • Re:Why? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by ecloud (3022) on Monday December 03, 2007 @01:56PM (#21561851) Homepage Journal
      In 1985 it would have been hard to envision the 'net as we know it now. It was nearly 10 years before the general public would discover the web. Why were these companies bothering? Mostly just for professional collaboration via telnet or ftp, right?
  • Symbolics ... (Score:5, Informative)

    by foobsr (693224) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:16AM (#21559629) Homepage Journal
    ... here is some pictures of a symbolics (those with the first domasin) machine for those who cannot imagine ...

    http://home.hakuhale.net/rbc/symbolics/20041113/20041113.html [hakuhale.net]

    CC.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by djones101 (1021277)
      Where's the Windows key? *ducks the inevitable smack*
    • Re:Symbolics ... (Score:5, Informative)

      by rs79 (71822) <hostmaster@open-rsc.org> on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:46AM (#21559879) Homepage
      Symbolics wasn't actually first, DEC was. Brian Reid registered it in January (and still has the datestamped mail from the Internic) but they screwed up the dates in whois.

      Mitre.org was the fitst domain registered.

    • That also caught my eye. Given that Symbolics was a workstation vendor (as opposed to, say, Sun's "Network is the Computer" schtik) I would have expected them to be in the '87 second-tier like Apple.

      Another registration that caught my eye:

      PRIME.COM
      March 4 1987

      Doctor: "It's a PRIME Computer! The most sophisticated computer ever!"
      Rommana: "Ask it what to do with a woman Doctor."
      PRIME: "MARRY HER"
      Doctor: "Oh-"
      Rommana: "Clever PRIME"
      Doctor: "You can say that again..."
      Rommana: "Clever PRIME"

    • That's a Symbolic's machine from 2004. The ones from the early 80s stood taller than myself and had wirerapped boards.
      • by afidel (530433)
        Huh? Those are full height HDD's, no way is that from 2004! 1994 I might believe but I don't believe there were ANY manufacturers of full height HDD's by 2000.
  • I remember when.... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by superid (46543) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:17AM (#21559639) Homepage
    One of my very first introductions to enterprise networking and internet was back in about 1988. I was friends with the admin of a Vax cluster at a progressive little company. He had printed out "the host table" that he downloaded each night. It probably wasn't more than 80 or 100 sheets of fanfold greenbar. I remember browsing it a bit and the only two that I can remember were burlingtoncoatfactory.com and lucasarts.com (or was it lucasfilms?)

    anyway....get off my lawn!
    • by Selfbain (624722) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:23AM (#21559681)
      You know the problem with people who have been around technology for a long time is when they go senile, their babble will change but most people probably won't be able to tell the difference.
    • One thing I remember about our 11/750 is we had a teleprinter attached to it - together with some wonderful, pre-Ethernet gizmos called 'Infaplugs'. Our Infaplug network comprised a ring of TV coax round the building and the plugs gave you a serial port wherever you fitted one of their sockets on the ring.

      Anyway, one night the ring was hit by a glitch which reset the plugs back to factory defaults - this turned on automatic echoing, which led to the classic situation of the VAX sending 'Login', to which the
  • by stoney27 (36372) * on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:19AM (#21559655) Homepage
    Yea it took two years, but these where internet connections. Most companies where not thinking about connecting there computers to the outside world unless they where doing some research or involved with networking in some way. There was not let's put out our "Marketing message on the Internet", most of it was he we where working with this in School and we could use this technology to share information or for sending email.

    -S
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by jcorno (889560)
      It looks like they went in groups, too. IBM, Sun, Intel, and TI all in one day. 3Com, Tandy, Unisys, and AMD on another. It probably wasn't an individual decision for each company. It'd be too much of a coincidence.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by jcorno (889560)
        That wasn't entirely true. It was IBM-Sun, then Intel-TI. That actually still makes sense. AMD was on a different day from the other three, though. That's what I get for not double-checking before posting.
      • by raju1kabir (251972) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:37AM (#21559807) Homepage

        It's not like they went to the Yahoo! Small Business website and registered the domains on their credit cards for $7.99.

        Whoever was maintaining the canonical copy of the hosts file had plenty of other stuff to do, this was just a minor chore for them. So it's reasonable to think that updates would get bunched up and made whenever he happened to have some free time.

        • by CastrTroy (595695)
          Which brings up my question. What was the cost of registering a .com domain back in the early days of the internet?
    • by north.coaster (136450) on Monday December 03, 2007 @11:40AM (#21560313) Homepage

      Remember that this took place during the time frame of the transition from a research oriented network (the ARPANET) to a larger, more production oriented network. The World Wide Web in it's current form had not even been invented yet. The creation of the .com domain was driven by a technical requirement to switch to a hierarchical based system, replacing a flat name space. The first step was to adopt the temporary .arpa domain name. Most companies then switched from the .arpa domain to the .com domain when their technical staff was ready to make the transition.

      In other words, registering for a .com domain was an administrative necessity for the relatively small number of companies that were connected to the DARPA Internet at that time. It was not a business decision.

      Putting this in context, during this same time frame lot of universities were connected to a different network, called CSNET. BITNET was also very active during this period. Although there were interconnections between the DARPA Internet, CSNET, and BITNET, each was a truly independent network. A lot of companies with Unix installations were on UUCP (which did not use a domain based name system).

      Considering the market segments that companies like Microsoft were involved with in the mid 1980's, it should not surprise anyone that they were not among the first to register for .com domains. It would not have made any sense for them to do so.

  • by lobiusmoop (305328) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:23AM (#21559671) Homepage
    The registering and selling-on of domain names in the mid-to-late 90's made some serious money for a few brave entrepreneurs. sex.com [wikipedia.org] is the classic case, although early domain-name squatting on big business names brought in easy bucks for some.
    • The page the link brings you to is full of ads for domain squatters, including a big picture one at the bottom for "Domain Fool", which "brings you domain names at foolish discounts!"

      So, they tried to figure out what domain names you might want, BOUGHT THEM from under you for pennies, and now are trying to sell them back to you for piles of money...

      "Hey, new mothers! After you have your baby, we're gonna take it, then sell it back to you for a FOOLISH DISCOUNT! Woo woo!"
  • This was the 80s (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Opportunist (166417) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:23AM (#21559673)
    1985, first domain. I'm fairly sure a few posting here weren't even born, most of the rest had other things on their mind than DNS problems (my main concerns was that I was going to a different school then and had to find new friends).

    The internet was but a dream. It was something that a few research companies, some universities and maybe even the ARPA cared about. Nobody had internet at home. If anything, we had modems to dial into BBSs.

    Does it make sense to register a COM domain? As in Commercial?

    Some companies realized that this will be the future (and I'm honestly surprised to see Siemens on the list, they must've had better and more visionary people in their upper echelons back then), and they registered their trademark as a com domain rather than fighting a lengthy battle with domain grabbers as many have done later. Cisco and a few others on the list make sense, since they are pretty tightly coupled with the success of the internet, being more or less networking companies.

    But, bluntly, why should any flower shop or manufacturer of beer bottles register "his" domain in the 80s? It was hardly their topic, and hardly any sensible way to sell their goods without an audience willing and able to buy via the net.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by tverbeek (457094)
      Back in those days there was a widespread belief (correct or not) that the internet could not be use for commercial purposes (the main argument being the US government's funding of the backbone). Sure, there was a "COM" TLD, but that was really just a basket for outfits that didn't fall into one of the main TLDs: GOV (government agencies), NET (infrastructure providers), EDU (colleges), ORG (non-profits), and MIL (military). If a commercial entity wanted on the net, they were welcome, but the assumption a
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Curunir_wolf (588405)

        Back in those days there was a widespread belief (correct or not) that the internet could not be use for commercial purposes (the main argument being the US government's funding of the backbone). Sure, there was a "COM" TLD, but that was really just a basket for outfits that didn't fall into one of the main TLDs: GOV (government agencies), NET (infrastructure providers), EDU (colleges), ORG (non-profits), and MIL (military). If a commercial entity wanted on the net, they were welcome, but the assumption among most netizens at the time was that they were doing it to participate in the net's non-commercial activities.

        Yep. The first time I connected to the Internet (through Delphi - anybody else old enough to remember that one?) I had to sign a usage agreement. It basically stated that commercial activity was strictly prohibited. The only allowed activity was education, research, government, and "incidental personal use".

        At the time, the entire thing was government funded.

        This was way before HTML and NCSA Mosaic. The "cool" browsing application was gopher. Direct connections! Links from one site to another!

    • Re:This was the 80s (Score:4, Interesting)

      by ajs (35943) <ajs@ a j s . com> on Monday December 03, 2007 @11:14AM (#21560101) Homepage Journal

      1985, first domain.
      Which is kind of odd, since, by 1987 when I got to college, just about every technical company and University that I had regular dealings with had a domain name. It goes to show how fast it scaled.

      Does it make sense to register a COM domain? As in Commercial?
      Actually, in the beginning, ".com" was a dumping ground for those commercial organizations that were considered "just barely worthy." The perception was that the Internet was for the .mil and .edu crowd who were the founders of the Apranet. .com was created for those companies that wanted to be able to do business with the Internet-savvy types in the universities and military via email or offer ftp access to software updates and the like. There was no real sense that .com was for commercial exploitation of the Net.

      But, bluntly, why should any flower shop or manufacturer of beer bottles register "his" domain in the 80s? It was hardly their topic, and hardly any sensible way to sell their goods without an audience willing and able to buy via the net.
      And really, they should not have. They had no business (I mean that literally) using the Internet of that day. In the 90s, with the advent of the Web, everything changed. But remember that the Net predates the Web, and back in those days it wasn't really a place that flower shops could have gotten anything from.

    • Re:This was the 80s (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Hymer (856453) on Monday December 03, 2007 @11:55AM (#21560447)
      The reason for those .com registrations back then is not what you assume... the reason was the need for human readable e-mail addresses. Most corporations wanted quick and easy way to exchange mails with .edu and .mil.
      You could either send snail-mail, call the university (or Pentagon) and hope somebody knew where the person you wanted to speak with were... or you could register on the net and send him an e-mail... and remember, this was the pre-cellular era.
      DEC was btw. very much involved in the whole (d)arpanet project (many universities used DEC computers to power the net back then).
      IBM was big iron for big business and tried btw. to build a global network based on SNA (read your SNA manual again, if you don't belive me).
      ...and yes you are right... the only reason for a pizzeria in Palo Alto to have a registered domain was for all those guys from HP, DEC and Cisco to order pizza by email... daily... tons of pizza every day... well, somebody just didn't see that option back then.
    • by David Off (101038) on Monday December 03, 2007 @12:51PM (#21561023) Homepage
      > Some companies realized that this will be the future (and I'm honestly surprised to see Siemens on the list, they must've had better and more visionary people in their upper echelons back then), and they registered their trademark as a com domain rather than fighting a lengthy battle with domain grabbers as many have done later.

      At the time we (I speak as a Siemens employee about the time) were developing a Unix based minicomputer systes based around National Semiconductor chips - the MX range of computers which were widely used by the German State (post, trains, work service etc). We then moved onto an i386 architecture, first with a port of SCO Unix then we did the actual Intel port of Unix 5.4 for AT&T. Our customers were pretty heavy users of TCP/IP - for network printing and file sharing.

      I don't know who registered siemens.com, we also had siesoft.co.uk for the UK. However the Unix visionary was Hans Strack Zimmermann. I don't recall the research headquarters in Munich having great connectivity at the time. I seem to recall most traffic went via UUCP via Dusseldorf university and was charged by the kilobyte but we did have ftp access by about 1988. I ran up a 70,000 DM bill with a colleague downloading stuff like the King James Bible!!!

      Siemens was a founder member of the OSF so has pretty good credentials.
  • What? (Score:4, Funny)

    by DurendalMac (736637) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:24AM (#21559687)
    No ASCIIPORN.COM?
  • by UnanimousCoward (9841) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:24AM (#21559689) Homepage Journal
    I wonder when Microsoft finally got on board? Damn, I shoulda squatted!!!

    • MS doesn't buy. MS litigates.
    • by alexhs (877055)
      Yes, I also found funny that while IBM, Sun, Apple, Adobe all made in that list, our visionary Bill Gates and his "road ahead" failed to be there.

      But I guess there was a MICROS~1 on a SMB/NetBIOS domain controller on an IPX/SPX network all along ;)
      • But I guess there was a MICROS~1 on a SMB/NetBIOS domain controller on an IPX/SPX network all along ;)

        Actually, Microsoft probably hooked up their Xenix [wikipedia.org] machines to the Internet for better inter-company and company-university communications. Believe it or not, Microsoft couldn't really run itself on DOS machines at the time. Xenix was used to provide the various networked services (like email) necessary for day-to-day operations.

    • McDonalds (Score:4, Interesting)

      by sharp-bang (311928) <sharp@bang@slashdot.gmail@com> on Monday December 03, 2007 @03:49PM (#21563337) Homepage
      Wired Magazine famously squatted [wired.com] mcdonalds.com in 1994. Worth a read for those wondering what the pre-dot-com corporate mentality was like.
  • Wow, Symbolics was ahead of the curve. Too bad their hardware cost and arm and a leg.

    I don't remember the fist web site I visited - but I remember it was using Lynx. I used gopher all the time, though. Turbogopher ran a lot better on the Mac LC3s at the University computer lab than the pre-beta of Mosaic.
    • webex on OS/2 here. Gopher, of course, before that. Actually, my first experience with gopher was on Penn State's mainframe, as was my first experience with usenet and FTP servers.
    • I remember Gopher. I used to be part of a BBS in Boston called Argus, which later my membership got 'sold' as Argus went tits up. The new BBS, Channel One, was touting its 'internet accessibility'. I went into local Channel One chat rooms to figure out just what the hell the internet was. Someone pointed me to the Gopher, IRC and FTP utilities through the BBS. Thought it was okay. The problem was service discovery, which was pretty weak back then. You sort of had to know what you were looking for.

      There was
  • by cliffski (65094) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:28AM (#21559723) Homepage
    I'm sure when the net was young that .orgs had to be non profit, and .nets were ISPs, but all of that seems to have totally disappeared. I also think its a bit sad that we have .co.uk and so on, but nobody used any .us or .usa names. .com became the default URL that you had to have, with everything else being cheap and forgettable. People can tell my site is UK site and that I'm a UK company, but US companies are completely invisible, with the rush for everyone to be dotcom. I'm sure a lot of UK customers are automatically pleasantly disposed towards my company when they realise I'm a bit 'local' to them, but the same thing isn't an option in the US.
    Given the ubiquity of bookmarks, hyperlinks and google, do we even need catchy domain names any more? I might have paid over the odds many years ago to get an easily remembered one, but now? who cares, people will find you with google anyway right?
    • I might have paid over the odds many years ago to get an easily remembered one, but now? who cares, people will find you with google anyway right?

      "I need a new basketball. I know! I'll order it from that sports site I went to a few months ago, they were pretty cool. Damn, I didn't bookmark it. What was it... qwomnx.com, something stupid like that. Ah well, I'll Google for 'sports', I'm sure it'll turn up."

    • by Cadre (11051) on Monday December 03, 2007 @11:09AM (#21560065) Homepage

      I'm sure when the net was young that .orgs had to be non profit

      .org was not created for non-profit organizations, it was originally created as a catch-all for organizations that didn't meet the requirements for the other gTLDs. PIR's History Page [pir.org], RFC 920 [ietf.org], RFC 1591 [ietf.org]

  • by suso (153703) * on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:33AM (#21559759) Homepage Journal
    Just curious, anyone know how much it cost to register a domain back at the beginning?
    • by Pontiac (135778)
      I don't know about 1987 but in 95 it was $100 for 2 years

      I found this on Wikipedia.. It says the same price was in effect in 1985

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.com [wikipedia.org]
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Salamander (33735)
        Read it again; that was 1995, not 1985. Domains were free for a long time.

        In 1995 the NSF authorized NSI to begin charging registrants (of .org and .net as well as .com) an annual fee, for the first-time since its inception.

        (The grammar error is the responsibility of the wikidork who made the entry.) I wasn't in early enough to get a domain for free, but I do have one for which I paid a one-time fee.

        • Nothing until the beginning of August, 1995- a friend registered hazmat.com for me at the end of July, 1995 (and it was free). Tried to register the .net, but at that point, you couldn't register a .net unless you were an infrastructure provider.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by ThreeGigs (239452)
      It was free at the very beginning. Mostly because it was all handwritten on paper then typed into a text file. Registering went something like "Hey Jack, can ya write me into the hosts file?"
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward
        There was an electronic form, a text file you'd download from sri-nic.arpa (later nic.ddn.mil), fill in the blanks and email back to sri-nic.

        For all that, it wasn't all that far removed from "Hey Jack".
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by RevWaldo (1186281)
      Not so much a cost issue but up until the mid-90's the PITA factor was a major hit in setting up a domain. No hosting services, so you'd need your own server. Private lines were way expensive and difficult to get set up with the phone company. No DSL so you'd need ISDN (56k! Wicked fast!) or bone up for a T1 or partial T1 which could run you $1000/month easy. Not to mention all the paperwork you'd have to submit to interNIC, etc. The best revenge on all the domain squatting is that all the "now a household
    • by simong (32944)
      It was still free in late 1994/early 1995 when I registered lotech.com but I seem to recall charges came in in about May-June 1995, and a .com was $100 for two years. Being a fledgling sysadmin at an ISP was quite handy back then.
  • by cerberusss (660701) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:33AM (#21559761) Homepage Journal
    This 'first 100 .com' stuff is all nice and dandy, but what I want to see is the LAST one hundred .com domains.
  • by Dan East (318230) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:37AM (#21559797) Homepage Journal
    Excerpt from checklist for when I get my time machine working:

    #10: Visit 1985 and buy up all 18,252 .COM domain names consisting of 2 and 3 letters.

    Dan East
  • 1985 -- I was in my freshman year of college, with high hopes and fond memories (not) of my high school computer math and statistics class, in which we sat in front of TRS-80's networked to a printer. Every day our class president would write a little basic program to print "(teacher's name) is a dick" over and over. The teacher would notice that the printer was running and would dutifully walk over to it, examine the output, and say "Heyyyyy.... ummmm," and that's when the class president would restart h
  • by glindsey (73730) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:40AM (#21559833)
    I believe that website was made in 1985, and hasn't been updated since.
  • I was worried until my conscious mind had the time to process the fact that TimeCube [timecube.com] != Datacube [datacube.com].
    I think we should all be glad that TimeCube took much longer to arrive.

  • Fanboyism (Score:5, Funny)

    by Yvanhoe (564877) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:45AM (#21559865) Journal
    Apple is there
    Microsoft is not
  • wiki (Score:5, Informative)

    by tofupup (14959) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:45AM (#21559867)
    here is a nice linked list of the *.com list
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.com [wikipedia.org]
  • One reason why it may of taken a while for commercial sites to become more common on the Internet, was, in the 1980s, there was a strong bias against ANY form of commercial message on the net expressed by many people. Posting a message on UseNET that even came close to an ad could easily get you emailbombed those days. (hard to think of these days, with UseNET so full of spam these days.)
  • sco.com

    Such a shame it had to come to this...
  • by NotQuiteReal (608241) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:49AM (#21559901) Journal
    Like John Gilmore's [toad.com] site.

    Simple and to the point.

    BTW this is the guy who can't fly because he refuses to get a government issued ID. Interesting stuff.

  • I am intrigued by toad.com

    Now there's a visionary.
  • by JeremyGNJ (1102465) on Monday December 03, 2007 @10:54AM (#21559949)
    I think it would be more interesting to see the "First 100 dot com's that were sold for big money"
  • The administrative contact for the oldest name, symbolics.com, has a Compuserve e-mail address.
  • From TFA: The first top level domains were COM, ORG, EDU, GOV, MIL and ccTLD.

    This seems to imply the possibility of a domain named 'whatever.cctld'. They should have just come out and listed the ccTLDs available at the beginning (UK, SU, etc.)
  • by dpbsmith (263124) on Monday December 03, 2007 @11:15AM (#21560107) Homepage
    Keep in mind that in those days the Internet was not supposed to be used for commercial purposes.

    In those days, .com's were only supposed to be on the net as a convenience for fostering research collaboration between them and their .edu partners.

    In theory, it was OK to send email from a .edu to a .edu, from a .edu to a .com it had a research relationship with, or from a .com to a .edu it had a research relationship, but .com's were not supposed to exchange email directly.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by afidel (530433)
      Sort of, the AUP for NSFNet did not allow for commercial use of the network, there could be communications between .com's but not for commercial purposes, ie if two defense contractors needed to work on a joint project that would be ok but not for one contractor to solicit business from another. That changed in 1988 which MCI Mail was experimentally hooked to the network, so not too long after the .com TLD.
  • Coincidence ? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by nsebban (513339) on Monday December 03, 2007 @11:30AM (#21560247) Homepage
    In March 1986, it's interesting to see that HP, Bell, IBM, SUN, Intel and TI registered their domain during the same month. IBM and SUN, but also Intel and TI got theirs on the exact same day.
  • Conspiracy (Score:4, Funny)

    by kryten_nl (863119) on Monday December 03, 2007 @11:40AM (#21560305)
    This confirms our theories:

    STARGATE.COM August 5 1986


    • by tb3 (313150)
      I guess the SGC has to be separate from the rest of the military net. ;)

  • Wow DEC registered BEFORE (but not by much) IBM!!
    And that was AFTER Ken Olson had gone senile!

  • by twasserman (878174) on Monday December 03, 2007 @01:09PM (#21561235)
    I was founder and CEO of Interactive Development Environments, Inc. (ide.com), which was the 78th dotcom on the "first 100" list. IDE developed the Software through Pictures multi-user graphical modeling environment that ran on a heterogeneous network of Unix workstations. We released our product in late 1984, got VC funding in May, 1988, and lasted until November, 1996, when we were merged into Aonix, which still exists today.

    Although we were 78th on that list, I believe that we were among the very first to place an ad that used an email address as a contact point. I was able to find an ad from the August, 1987, issue of Unix World, where we gave our email address as ucbvax!sun!ide!sales, using the UUCP format. Our customers were developers and early adopters, mostly on Sun workstations, so we actually got some email and some sales leads in this way. Of course, we switched to the "@ide.com" format as soon as we were able to do so. (Please post a reply if you are aware of an earlier use of an email address in a published ad.)

    Fun times....

    • by Roadkills-R-Us (122219) on Monday December 03, 2007 @03:35PM (#21563137) Homepage
      I was wondering if anyone else was going to bring this up or if I'd have to. Since .com was the ugly stepsister, and most everyone had email and file transfer access through uucp, most people weren't in a hurry to change anything. For a small company without any research ties, it was (a) hard to get anything besides third or lower tier uucp, (b) a connection besides uucp to a university or a well-connected friend's company was horribly expensive, and (c) there wasn't much point- it bought you nothing.

      In 1988 I worked at Sales Technologies, which went by ...emory.edu!stiatl . Even when we registered salestech.com, it took a while before we could really do much with it. 98% of the people we did anything with still had to reach us through UUCP, which meant !!!!!!stiatl.

      It gave us huge geek foo, though.
  • Nasty site.. (Score:3, Interesting)

    by popeydotcom (114724) on Monday December 03, 2007 @03:06PM (#21562781) Homepage
    http://www.whoisd.com/oldestcom.php [whoisd.com] is the list I have had in my bookmark for a good few years..
  • 1985 - that late ? (Score:3, Informative)

    by Alain Williams (2972) <addw@phcomp.co.uk> on Monday December 03, 2007 @04:00PM (#21563493) Homepage
    I thought that I was late when I registered my name in early 1988. NRS registration in the UK started in 1983.

    We had names the other way round in those days, most significant bit first: uk.co.phcomp

  • by nuckfuts (690967) on Monday December 03, 2007 @07:38PM (#21565941)
    You might have noticed 3COM.COM on that list, about half way down. Strictly speaking it was not allowed to use a number as the first letter in a DNS name. To quote from RFC 1035:

    "The labels must follow the rules for ARPANET host names. They must start with a letter, end with a letter or digit, and have as interior characters only letters, digits, and hyphen. There are also some restrictions on the length. Labels must be 63 characters or less."

    I remember wondering how 3COM got away with it.

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