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Seamonkey 1.1 Released 143

Posted by Zonk
from the release-the-seamonkies-of-doom dept.
stuuf writes "Version 1.1 of the Seamonkey Internet Application Suite is now available, with quite a few improvements over the 1.0 series. Some of the new features include spell checking in form text areas, a new tagging system to classify email, a better indicator for secure web sites and preview images for browser tabs. This release also includes many of the updates that have gone into the Firefox 2 and Thunderbird 2 branches. Check out the release notes and download page for more."
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Seamonkey 1.1 Released

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  • Competitors (Score:4, Interesting)

    by WiseMuse (1039922) on Friday January 19, 2007 @11:00AM (#17680756) Homepage
    Who are the major players in the web application suite area?
    • Re:Competitors (Score:4, Interesting)

      by free space (13714) on Friday January 19, 2007 @11:04AM (#17680830)
      I'd say Opera, they have web, email and integrated clients for all sorts of stuff in one package.

      Also, IE+outlook express (yuck!)+msn messenger aren't really a suite, but they come from the same company :)

    • by bunratty (545641) on Friday January 19, 2007 @11:44AM (#17681448)
      There's been some talk of packaging Firefox, Thunderbird, and Sunbird together [slashdot.org] as a sort of Internet suite.
      • by 0racle (667029) on Friday January 19, 2007 @12:33PM (#17682230)
        Thats a great idea, they could call it Sea Monkey.
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Ididerus (898803)
          Um, it doesn't use Firefox, it uses the less-than-clean UI of Mozilla. It looks similar to Netscape ver.5 Which is soooo 1995

          I'm sure that it is a great browser, but Mozilla needs to give us the option of which browser to use with the Seamonkey pack. Then I might consider getting rid of my Firefox/Gmail.com/mIRC/Notepad combo, which I can tell you is a lot more compact than Seamonkey.
          • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

            by Randle_Revar (229304)
            Um, it doesn't use Firefox, it uses the less-than-clean UI of Mozilla. It looks similar to Netscape ver.5 Which is soooo 1995

            It does default to the "Classic" theme, but it also comes with the "Modern" theme, which is much nicer. And you can download many other themes from addons.mozilla.org.

            I'm sure that it is a great browser, but Mozilla needs to give us the option of which browser to use with the Seamonkey pack.

            There is no way to do that and keep the integration, because SeaMonkey is a single executable.
            • by bunratty (545641)
              No matter what theme you use, the user interfaces of SeaMonkey and Firefox are quite different. SeaMonkey's interface remains close to that Mozilla, Netscape 6, and Netscape 4. Firefox's interface is simplified and streamlined. As one small example, SeaMonkey's Tools menu contains ten items, six of which have menus of their own! Firefox's Tools menu has eight items, none of which has its own submenu.
          • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

            by evilneko (799129)
            Right. It uses the more-complete UI of Mozilla. ;) And it's anything but clunky. Maybe I'm biased as a Netscape fan from back when, but I rather like the UI. Interface aside, Seamonkey uses the same engine as Firefox, and at times uses a newer version. Mozilla/Seamonkey was on Gecko 1.8 long before Firefox got it.
        • by bunratty (545641)
          No, SeaMonkey is a monolithic application. The package of Firefox and Thunderbird would exist as a single download and install, but the applications would remain separate. It's just like OpenOffice is one download and install, but is six separate applications. As Mitchell Baker, Chief Lizard Wrangler, explains:

          ...it may well be the case that one option for delivering Mozilla products is to have a combined Firefox, Thunderbird, maybe a calendar, who knows. Some combination of products that the user gets and

        • And the download slogan could be, "Spank the Sea Monkey, now!
    • by Anonymous Coward
      Here [sea-monkey.com].

      :-)

    • Unless you count IE+Outlook Express, or Safari+Mail. Everyone's moved toward solo apps. These days it's pretty much Seamonkey and Opera that are doing the Suite thing.

      Seamonkey: Web, email, newsgroups, HTML authoring, chat
      Opera: Web, email, newsgroups, feeds, chat
  • Wanna bet someone will post a 'I like Seamonkey except for the memory leak problem ..
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      >Wanna bet someone will post a 'I like Seamonkey
      >except for the memory leak problem ..

      It ain't FUD, bud. Firefox does have memory leak
      problems. It's still my favorite and primary browser,
      but the problems are real.
      • by bunratty (545641)
        Yes, Firefox does have memory leaks. But no, it typically doesn't cause any visible problems for most users. I'm sure all browsers have memory leaks, as do most moderately complex software packages. But generally leaks are a relatively benign problem that will not cause symptoms until after many days or weeks of use.
        • >But generally leaks are a relatively benign problem
          >that will not cause symptoms until after many days
          >or weeks of use.

          Hey, I'm pragmatic about it. Like I said, Firefox
          is my primary browser. But it's irritating to be
          constantly told that we're imagining it.
          • by bunratty (545641) on Friday January 19, 2007 @12:04PM (#17681804)
            I think the FUD that the OP was referring to was not that Firefox and SeaMonkey do have some leaks, but that some people try to make "the memory leak" seem like a huge, obvious problem that is going unfixed. I've seen several posts lately saying something to the effect that "the memory leak" is not being addressed. The reality is that the leaks are being fixed. I also don't see any evidence that Firefox or SeaMonkey leak any more than other browsers. So there is FUD, and also you are not just imagining memory leaks.
    • I like Seamonkey except for its out-dated UI and the fact that it bundles a bunch of applications together when I really only want a web browser. ;-)
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by arunprasannan (904752)
        You can choose to download/install only the components you desire, in the installer.
      • by pe1chl (90186)
        I still consider it a very unfortunate decision that the Mozilla suite was split in Firefox and Thunderbird (dropping the composer).
        It was always possible to install only the browser, and the result of the split is that configuration information required for both programs is now fragmented, and that shared components like Gecko are no longer shared.

        Unfortunately it does not look like Seamonkey will ever take over from Firefox and Thunderbird again, and we will have to live with this.
      • by binarybum (468664)
        and you can switch the UI theme too. the modern theme that comes packaged with it is quite slick. I'm a fan of the home button plugin [mozdev.org] too.
  • I'm unable to install to review- can someone give me a "more than one sentence" description of the email tagging? How robust is it? How are the tags used? How are the tags arranged in the UI? How easy is it to tag? Can you "auto-tag" on meta data? Can you setup a "rule" like auto-tag? etc... I've been interested in this for awhile [opera.com].
    • by Pretzalzz (577309)
      You can tag e-mails as belonging to one or more user-defined categories by either using the numbers 1-9(0 clears all tags) or using the menu. Each tag has a color associated with it, and the e-mail in your inbox assumes the color of the first tag making it easily identifiable. You can also tag e-mails based on a filter action, and search for tags, etc. Tags are essentially a reimplementation of 'labels' except tags allow more than one per e-mail. In the past I've lost my labels if my .msf got corrupted,
  • Spell Checker (Score:5, Insightful)

    by jmagar.com (67146) on Friday January 19, 2007 @11:22AM (#17681128) Homepage
    It's about time that the spell check feature become standard in all browsers. It boggles the mind that this has for a very long time been the main reason to get the Google toolbar, and the browser folks have not responded by including it in their package. With all this web 2.0 hype, and you being the person of the year, why is there no spell checker in the tool we use to create all that damned content?

    Well done Seamonkey!

    • why is there no spell checker in the tool we use to create all that damned content
      Probably because most of us dont use browsers to create content, only to view it. Creators tend to use tooling with spellcheckers included.
      • Re:Spell Checker (Score:5, Insightful)

        by bradkittenbrink (608877) on Friday January 19, 2007 @11:43AM (#17681442) Homepage Journal
        Probably because most of us dont use browsers to create content, only to view it. Creators tend to use tooling with spellcheckers included.
        ... he says as creating "content" from within a browser.
        • How do you know? He might have written that text anywhere and then copied it to his browser. Or used mozex to edit the text elsewhere and have it automatically inserted into the textarea.
          • by LandruBek (792512)
            . . . and have it automatically inserted into the textarea.

            What textarea? Oh, right, the textarea of his browser!!

          • How do you know? He might have written that text anywhere and then copied it to his browser.

            Witch is exectley wat I hvae to do wenevr I pst to /. And it s a PITA!

      • by spootle (1033314)
        Web browsers are used to create a lot of content on the internet, your post for example.
      • by Abcd1234 (188840)
        Probably because most of us dont use browsers to create content, only to view it.

        Tell that to someone who authors stuff on a wiki (such as Wikipedia). Or posts content to discussion forums (like, say, Slashdot). Or uses a webmail client.
    • Re: (Score:1, Interesting)

      by garcia (6573)
      Seamonkey is a Web-browser, advanced e-mail and newsgroup client, IRC chat client, and HTML editing made simple -- all your Internet needs in one application.

      I'm not quite sure why I need a browser, e-mail/news reader, IRC client, and HTML editor together in one package. To me (other than the e-mail and news readers) these are very separate functions that have no business being packaged together. Then again I'm very particular about my IRC client and e-mail and I would much prefer to use a regular text ed
      • by Anonymous Coward
        Not that I'm a bad speller, I'm just a poor typer while driving.

        Then do us all a favour and PULL OVER!
      • Re:Spell Checker (Score:5, Insightful)

        by drinkypoo (153816) <martin.espinoza@gmail.com> on Friday January 19, 2007 @11:51AM (#17681582) Homepage Journal
        I'm not quite sure why I need a browser, e-mail/news reader, IRC client, and HTML editor together in one package.

        Well then don't download it and STFU. What a waste of bytes. Guess what? I don't need a mammogram. Maybe they should take those breast cancer awareness commercials off the TV!

        • by jasonditz (597385)
          I don't need a mammogram. Maybe they should take those breast cancer awareness commercials off the TV!

          You make a persuasive argument.
      • As far as spell check goes -- amen! I *love* in-browser spell checking and can't stand life without it on my mobile device. Not that I'm a bad speller, I'm just a poor typer while driving.


        Unless this was a joke... you are a f'n jerkoff for typing while driving.


        I don't need to go into WHY.

      • by Lacota (695046)
        "I'm just a poor typer while driving." Most terrifying thing ever. Keep your eyes on the road man! They've banned cellphones in cars for a reason (at least where I live). Think of the children! (no really :P)
    • Re: (Score:1, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward
      I would say that spell checking should be a service the OS provides. Then I can configure it one place and not in multiple applications. Right now I have different dictionaries to download for Abiword, for OpenOffice and for Firefox and Thunderbird. It is rather sub-optimal. Windows XP does not do it, Vista, KDE, GNOME and MacOS X not sure.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by PygmySurfer (442860)
        MacOS X DOES provide an inline spell checker, though I believe it only works for Cocoa apps, not Carbon, and I think they leave it up to developers whether to implement it or not (it's an option for certain types of controls, like text fields). There's also a spell checker on the Services menu, though its more for checking the spelling of individual words.
        • Re:Spell Checker (Score:4, Informative)

          by 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) on Friday January 19, 2007 @12:30PM (#17682174)

          MacOS X DOES provide an inline spell checker, though I believe it only works for Cocoa apps, not Carbon, and I think they leave it up to developers whether to implement it or not...

          This is not quite correct. The OS X spellchecking service, like all the other services, works automatically in Cocoa apps without any work on the part of the developer (as I understand) and functions inline. Developers can integrate it in additional ways as well and it can be included in Carbon applications, but the developers have to do it specifically. For example, Firefox3 alpha 1 includes the native OS X spellchecking with the same dictionary as all the other applicatons, despite not being a cocoa application.

          There's also a spell checker on the Services menu, though its more for checking the spelling of individual words.

          This is the same spell checker and uses the same dictionary. It is just a different interface for getting to that function.

    • Re: (Score:1, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Let me correct your sentence for you:
      It's about time that the spell check feature become standard in all OSs.

      I think almost anyone who uses OS X will agree - spell-check is a service that is better done at the OS level. The idea of every application in the world having to include code-bloat to include a spell-check, all of which I have to add my last name to, is insane.

      This is one reason I much prefer Camino to Firefox on OS X, as well.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        This is one reason I much prefer Camino to Firefox on OS X, as well.

        Firefox 3 alpha 1 on OS X is pretty stable for me and includes cocoa widget support so the spell checking service and all the other services work just fine in it. You might want to check it out as it is more up-to-date than Camino which tends to lag Firefox quite a bit. It's not for everyone, but you do have a choice between trailing edge or bleeding edge if that is the feature you need.

    • It's about time that the spell check feature become standard in all browsers. It boggles the mind that this has for a very long time been the main reason to get the...

      What boggles my mind is the degree to which people have come to rely on their browsers and are convinced that every feature normally associated with a different program should be built into their browser of choice.

      Don't mean to sound overly critical, but for me, a browser is (ignoring the few extra bits) something that renders web pages. I do
      • What boggles my mind is the degree to which people have come to rely on their browsers and are convinced that every feature normally associated with a different program should be built into their browser of choice. Don't mean to sound overly critical, but for me, a browser is (ignoring the few extra bits) something that renders web pages. I don't want it to do anything more.

        Different people have different needs and wants both in their browser and in other programs. Many, many people want spell checking f

    • Hey, with the automated nightly builds I've been enjoying inline spellchecking, post-crash session recovery and a few other nice features for a while, and only had to clean out my profile, nuke the whole thing and revert to a released version a couple of times.

      But I wish they would fix printing. I print stuff all the time, I much prefer the higher res, higher contrast and massive convenience factor of paper over screen - and it's still ignoring the "shrink to fit" checkbox and trimming the top / bottom li

    • What I would rather have is a facility that can spell check any text in any application. That way I can have a single dictionary, instead of every application having its own (with its own code base, causing its own bugs and its own maintenance headaches, etc).

      Something like what these guys [humanized.com] are doing.
      • What I would rather have is a facility that can spell check any text in any application.

        This is already built into OS X, along with a dictionary/thesaurus option. Better yet, OS X includes a services framework that allows the addition/customization of arbitrary functions like this, called services. I regularly use one for grammar checking (included with leopard), language translations, bibliography reference formatting, collated online dictionary lookups, removing windows line endings, statistical info,

    • In web browsers? How about throughout the entire operating system? Considering how unobtrusive that little red underline is, it seems to me you should have spell-checking available in every text box that appears on your computer, regardless of the application. And from the same dictionary, too.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by ZOMFF (1011277)
      write! the spell cheque inn firefox is help full. Know wonder pea poll speak sew hi lee of it. Eye am surprised its knot inn this knew see monkey soft where.
    • by Jessta (666101)
      's don't need spell checking. What browsers need is a way to lauch an external text edit for editing form fields.
    • by sootman (158191)
      Couldn't agree more. I've been using Safari's for ages and it's great. (Edit -> Spelling -> Check spelling as you type.) It works in HTML textareas (like Slashdot's 'Comment' box) but not text boxes (like the 'Subject' box.) Still, for all the webmail I use and forum posting I do, it's great. What's best about it is it goes into the systemwide dictionary (~/Library/Spelling/en) so if I add a word in, say, TextEdit, the next time I'm writing about it in a browser it doesn't get flagged.

      Too bad MS Offic
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by antdude (79039)
      I just upgraded my SeaMonkey and I didn't like this feature. I am usually a good speller, and I noticed the speed was slower with this real-time feature enabled.
  • This would be fantastic if there were a portable apps version of it. [portableapps.com] Currently I run portable Firefox and Thunderbird off my USB drive from work, and they're great. Having all that extra functionality bundled in, as well as only having one program running would rock.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Paulrothrock (685079)
      If you use portable Firefox a lot you might want to look into Google Browser Sync. It keeps all your stuff synced across multiple browsers.
  • Just downloaded Seamonkey to replace Mozilla. So this is what it feels like to have a current browser!

    Hopefully it fixes the jump/select issue I had with Slashdot and Mozilla.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 19, 2007 @11:51AM (#17681576)
    I am writing a theme called SeaGnome for Seamonkey so it blends in nicely with GTK desktops. I have the Mail and Browser section but am still working on the remaining suite applications.
    Try it out here:
    http://markbokil.org/index.php?section=tech&conten t=c_linuxseagnome.php [markbokil.org]

    I also have written an extension for Seamonkey which allows you to collapse down the toolbars and provides a quick menu to often used features. Great to reclaim screen realestate while browsing.
    http://markbokil.org/index.php?section=tech&conten t=c_linuxmonkeymenu.php [markbokil.org]
  • Is it possible to disable certain components of SeaMonkey? The HTML editor, browser, and IRC client would be helpful for me, but I don't really need the mail client since I use GMail or read newsgroups.
  • I thought it was going to be an upgraded version of the brine shrimp everybody loves.
  • It would be nice if it support extensions like Firefox, thats the only thing holding me back from using it.
    • by Spad (470073)
      Well apart from the fact that it does, it does.

      Only problem is that a lot of "Firefox" extension developers don't bother to add Seamonkey install scripts, so a lot of them won't install, even though they work perfectly.
    • Re: (Score:1, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      There's a fairly extensive list of extensions that work with SeaMonkey [skynet.be], and two people are actively working on making Firefox-only extensions compatible with SeaMonkey when their original authors are too lazy or incapable of doing so themselves. (Obviously they won't have success with all extensions - some extensions would need to be re-coded from scratch, given how crappy the original code is - but they're good with responding to requests [mozillazine.org], and have done a lot of good work already.)
  • Does anyone understand the numbering system? They've been calling the nightlies 1.5a for a while so is this a different branch or did they just decide right before release that jumping to 1.5 would look silly so they jumped back to 1.1?
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Arctic Dragon (647151)
      SeaMonkey 1.5 will be the next release. As per MozillaWiki [mozilla.org]:

      The current working title for a release from that work is "SeaMonkey 1.5" (subject to change) with a release expected in 2007. (This work takes place on "Mozilla trunk".)
    • Re: (Score:1, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      This is from the Gecko 1.8.1 branch, the same as Firefox 2.0. The 1.5a nightlies are from the trunk, which will be Gecko 1.9, the same as the Firefox 3.0 alpha/nightlies.
  • Mozilla has added another animal to the zoo.
    • by pembo13 (770295)
      Mozilla has little to do with Seamonkey
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by bunratty (545641)
        Actually, Mozilla has almost everything to do with SeaMonkey. They developed Mozilla 1.8, which SeaMonkey is still based upon. They host the source code, bug database, and releases. The core of SeaMonkey is shared with Firefox and Thunderbird so most Mozilla development directly improves SeaMonkey with no extra effort. SeaMonkey remains an official Mozilla project [mozilla.org]. SeaMonkey simply isn't a Mozilla product, which means that Mozilla doesn't drive SeaMonkey-specific development or provide support.
        • by jonasj (538692)
          It should be pointed out that when you speak of Mozilla as an entity (as in "they host", "Mozilla doesn't", etc) you are speaking of the Mozilla Corporation, which is only a small, though important subset of all that Mozilla is. http://www.mozilla.org/projects/ [mozilla.org]
  • The worst part of Thunderbird is that it doesn't actually delete messages, and so, especially with tons of spam incoming, the email program gets very slow in starting up even after only a few weeks of use because it has to process 1000 or more messages for every 100 you save.

    Does the Seamonkey email program have this problem?

    And why doesn't anybody bother fixing this? It cannot be that hard to shift things so that emails are saved as individual files or to write a program which retroactively breaks up the
    • by robogun (466062)
      I'm not seeing that problem, it seems to run fine for me with saved emails dating back to 1998 (imported thru Navigator 3 on) split into folders in six-month increments with about 4000 mails in each (a lot of those mails with attachments).

      After deleting, you have to compress the folders (something dating back to the Navigator 3 days) & do not interrupt while it's doing so even if it seems locked or you will lose your mail. If you have a lot of mail it might take some time.

      The major bug for me is you sti
  • When I ran Mozilla browser and opened another one... it started babbling about profiles... I think it did the same thing with a mail client.
    Now... that was years ago... Recently when SeaMonkey installed with my linux distro... I started the browser... clicked on the icon in my menu to open another one and... that crap was still there ! If you can't by default open 2 browsers in the same 'profile' without having to hack it in some way... the application suite is totally useless.
    • by Kelson (129150) *

      Recently when SeaMonkey installed with my linux distro... I started the browser... clicked on the icon in my menu to open another one and... that crap was still there !

      From TFA (specifically, the release notes [mozilla.org]):

      • [Linux] When launching SeaMonkey, already-running instances are detected (Bug 122698)

      If this is your only problem with SeaMonkey, upgrading to the new release fixes it.

  • For those who are curious or want SeaMonkey in Debian via apt-get, it is called IceApe [debian.org].
  • by coldmist (154493) on Friday January 19, 2007 @04:04PM (#17685988) Homepage
    and now I use FireFox/Thunderbird.

    Why? Extensions. I actually like Seamonkey better for tab options (Ex: Firefox doesn't honor the preference to open a new tab showing the home page.) and the overall integration (icons in the bottom left of the screen, ctrl-[123] to switch between browser/email, etc. Another one: One theme applies to the browser and email.

    However, I run Firefox and Thunderbird now for the extensions.

    But, I wish one theme could be used for both.

    I wish it had all the options (or honored the about:config options that do work, somewhat).

    If/when Seamonkey supports FireFox/Thunderbird extensions, will quickly go back to it.

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