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The End of Net Anonymity In Brazil 242

Posted by kdawson
from the good-while-it-lasted dept.
DieNadel writes, "The Brazilian senate is considering a bill that will make it a crime to join a chat, blog, or download from the Internet without fully identifying oneself first. Privacy groups and Internet providers are very concerned, and are trying to lobby against the bill, but it seems they won't have much success." From the article: "If approved, it will be a crime, punishable with up to 4 years of jail time, to disseminate virus or trojans, unauthorizedly access data banks or networks and send e-mail, join chat, write a blog or download content anonymously."
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The End of Net Anonymity In Brazil

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  • by khasim (1285) <brandioch.conner@gmail.com> on Monday November 06, 2006 @01:50PM (#16737689)
    First off, passing a law that the criminals will disregard is just about useless. They're already criminals. Breaking another law is not going to deter them.

    Secondly, there are so many ways around this when you are a criminal. Crack someone else's machine and you can do whatever you want as if you were legally that person. Who stupid is that?

    If you're really good, you'd crack 2 machines outside Brazil and use them to bounce traffic around before it got to you. Your machine and record would be 100% clean.

    Finally, let's talk wireless. Unless the government wants to crack down on unsecured wireless connections, they're going to lose this one.

    This is nothing more than an attempt to scare the good citizens into self-censoring their legal activities. And that is disgusting.
  • by daeg (828071) on Monday November 06, 2006 @01:51PM (#16737705)
    Reply with your full name, address, job, a list of your family members, government ID number, and your hopes and dreams and I'll tell you why.
  • by Control Group (105494) * on Monday November 06, 2006 @01:54PM (#16737747) Homepage
    First off, passing a law that the criminals will disregard is just about useless. They're already criminals. Breaking another law is not going to deter them.

    If we paid attention to that logic, we'd have 50% fewer laws than we do.

    Not that you're wrong, of course, just that passing laws is how the government proves it's Doing Something, irrespective of wheter the law does anything other than screw the innocent.

    And I don't think this varies appreciably from government to government.
  • by khasim (1285) <brandioch.conner@gmail.com> on Monday November 06, 2006 @02:29PM (#16738235)
    Not that you're wrong, of course, just that passing laws is how the government proves it's Doing Something, irrespective of wheter the law does anything other than screw the innocent.

    So, how about if all the laws on the books had a limited life span? After 8 years (or 16 or 32 or whatever), they expired and needed to be passed again?

    That way Congress could continue to "be tough on X" without needing to do any actual work or impact our Freedoms at all?
  • Re:As always... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by 1u3hr (530656) on Monday November 06, 2006 @03:05PM (#16738869)
    Yeah, because someone being in favor of better identification of easy terror targets like airlines, and being in favor of better money tracing, automatically means they are in favor of no privacy in society at all.

    Yes, right, despite thinking you're being sarcastic. Because collecting huge amounts of information about legitimate travellers does nothing to stop terrorists. Just look at the No Fly List, that catches every terrorist who books a ticket under his own name (i.e., none) while inconveniencing thousands with similar names. Idiotic security theatre. And how many times must it be pointed out that the 9/11 terrorists mostly had legit IDs and clean records; they would have walked though today's security just as easily, after surrendering their shampoo bottles. Money tracing? Similar profiling goes on here, inconveniencing every poor schmuck trying to send money home to his family, if his name happens to be Mohammed, while the actual terrorists duck the whole system.

    All the information needed to predict, and prevent, 911, was already in the US government's hands before the event. They need better, smarter analysis, more people on the ground, not more noise. But that's what bureaucrats know how to do, and that's their solution to every problem.

  • Like South Korea? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by CycleFreak (99646) on Monday November 06, 2006 @03:18PM (#16739095)

    Like this article [slashdot.org] talked about?

    Next year a new law will come into force which will force Koreans to reveal their name and ID number before they share their opinions online.

    The article doesn't mention any specific penalties for posting anonymously. 4 years of prison time is an absurd penalty for a (usually) harmless offense. It does mention other, more serious offenses than insulting someone and "up to 4 years ..." so I'd guess that if you say "that guy's an idiot" without revealing your identity and you are (somehow) discovered, then the penalty won't be as severe as hacking into "data banks" or knowingly spreading a virus.

    And, as in the U.S., the politicians really and truly do not understand technology. At all. My hunch is that the politicians in power just want some way to prosecute people who post "less-than-favorable" information about them - even if it's true.

  • by hatredman (740429) on Monday November 06, 2006 @06:17PM (#16742931) Journal
    The 1988 Constitution of Brazil already forbids anonymninty in any media (not only the Net) so all this talk about "a new law enforcement" is just ludicrous and redundant. They can pass a law on the subject just to regulate the Internet use of its citizens (think China?) but the war against pornog^dw anonymnity is old news. Bad enough, the non-techie general public seem to endorse the goddam law.

    The whole thing started because former president Jose Sarney was being (fairly) accused of corruption by many blogs. Sarney's attorneys managed to shut down the majority of them, even the foreign ones.

    Oh, wait, he'll shut down ./ also...

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