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Visa Cuts Off AllOfMp3.com 394

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the ends-with-a-whimper dept.
denebian devil writes "On the heals of allofmp3.com's press conference trying to clean up its image, Visa has suspended its credit card service to allofmp3.com. From the article "[Allofmp3 is] no longer permitted to accept Visa cards," said Simon Barker, a Visa International spokesman. "The action we've taken is in line with legislation passed in Russia and international copyright law." Almost simultaneously, allofmp3.com has announced that it is shifting over to an ad-supported model. For those who don't want to (or can't) buy allofmp3's DRM-free music, they are providing DRM-laden music that can be played only within a restricted player provided by the website."
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Visa Cuts Off AllOfMp3.com

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  • by MoOsEb0y (2177) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:19AM (#16501023)
    ...there's Mastercard.
    • by igny (716218) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:20AM (#16501047) Homepage Journal
      Mastercard cut off AllofMP3 as well.
      • by SScorpio (595836)
        But do they take American Express? Oh wait... let's see there is Costco, and... umm...
      • by NetDanzr (619387) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:29AM (#16501185)
        That's where paying through third parties comes in. I've been using XROST for over a year when recharging my Allofmp3 account, and that method has been always working well. Similar system has been working with sports betting sites for a while, and given how easy it is to reroute money I don't think non-US based businesses will have to shut down anytime soon.
        • XROST? (Score:3, Interesting)

          by Kadin2048 (468275)
          Can you elaborate?

          I saw the XROST option on there a while ago, but I don't know anything about it or how it works.

          Also, I recall at one point there was an option to use some type of "online currency" that was sold in the U.K. at gas stations and retail stores, meaning that you could buy them with cash, and then you went to a web site and typed in the number on the card you bought, and could transfer the money to AllOfMp3.com -- that seems like a pretty good way of doing cash-transations on the web. Pity it'
          • Re:XROST? (Score:5, Informative)

            by NetDanzr (619387) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @11:08AM (#16501737)
            XROST is simply an on-line gift card shop. You purchase a gift card, and get a card number and pin code in return. You input this information into Allofmp3, and your account is recharged.

            Not so long ago, XROST still worked with PayPal. Currently, it works primarily with prepaid cash cards - the type you mention - but also with Click&Buy, which is available in the US. I've got family in Europe, so for me it's easiest to Skype them and ask for one of the cash cards.

            • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

              by massysett (910130)
              It seemed to me XROST was simply a front for allofmp3.com so that they could take credit cards. Have you seen any other merchant that actually takes XROST? I remember that every other retailer listed on their site was "coming soon."
          • The next stage will be trading beads and beaver pelts for MP3s. Maybe I can barter with them? "I'll help you turn a couple of PCs into bots for some tunes."
      • by chill (34294) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:39AM (#16501323) Journal
        Mastercard cut off AllofMP3 as well.

        No, they didn't. Mastercard is the only credit/debit option that works, as of 5 minutes ago.
    • by Balthisar (649688) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @11:22AM (#16501999) Homepage
      Just tried my Mastercard, and then I stopped. It looks like payments are now being outsourced to some place called www.e-centru.com, which is in Moldova. I don't remember ever being redirected to another payment site in the past, although it's showing that I last recharged my account on March 17th, 2005 (I don't buy a lot of music [or pirate it for that matter]). Anyone else ever been directed to this company to accept payments? It *is* showing just Mastercard as an option.

      Well... here goes. That's what fraud protection is good for.

      Well, it worked. Now I've got to figure out $25.25 worth of music that I want. I wish they had audiobooks.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by sustik (90111)
        I made a payment yesterday and bought some songs using those credits. I can understand that some are vary about paying on russian or non-us operated websites. But let me point out that it would be very foolish for allofmp3.com engage in any fraudulent activity, since appearently they are under heavy scrutiny.

        Though you may say that I am pretty ignorant about the accusations against them, I keep an eye on any *official* news regarding their legality. I find their service of good quality (ogg encoding anyw
  • by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohnNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:19AM (#16501025) Journal
    This whole time AllOfMp3 has been operating, it has been under a clause in the Russian government's legislation (from their site):
    The availability over the Internet of the ALLOFMP3.com materials is authorized by the license # LS-3?-05-03 of the Russian Multimedia and Internet Society (ROMS) and license # 006/3M-05 of the Rightholders Federation for Collective Copyright Management of Works Used Interactively (FAIR). In accordance to the licenses' terms MediaServices pays license fees for all materials downloaded from the site subject to the Law of the Russian Federation "On Copyright and Related Rights". All these materials are solely for personal use. Any further distribution, resale or broadcasting are prohibited.

    The works available from ALLOFMP3.com are protected by the Law of the Russian Federation "On Copyright and Related Rights" and are for personal use of a buyer. Commercial use of such material is prohibited. Recording, copying, distribution on any media is possible only upon special consent of a Rightholder.

    The user bears sole responsibility for any use and distribution of all materials received from AllOFMP3.com. This responsibility is dependent on the national legislation in each user's country of residence. The Administration of AllOFMP3.com does not possess information on the laws of each particular country and is not responsible for the actions of foreign users.
    Read that last paragraph, if you've been in the United States & using AllOfMp3.com, they've been shifting legality issues to you. Visa has now chosen to recognize this issue and not be party to breaking the law.

    So, to recap, it seems that media in Russia is still somewhat regarded as belonging to the people. However, this is not true in many other countries.

    I cannot say I blame them with the gustapo **AA about.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Aladrin (926209)
      What's amazing is that Visa ever allowed it in the first place.
      • by k_187 (61692)
        My guess they didn't know/care enough to check. Notice they got dropped 1 day after Allofmp3's first press conference.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        What's amazing is that Visa ever allowed it in the first place.

        How's that amazing? Visa makes money off of every transaction. I'd say that they only quit because someone put pressure on them, not because they want to stop making money on those transactions.

        They want money just like every other corporation. I'm sure that they don't entirely care where the money came from. I'm pretty sure that you can still use Visa to pay for pornographic content that may be illegal in your particular region of the co

        • by minus9 (106327) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:43AM (#16501369) Homepage
          "(sodomy anyone?)."

          Not for me thanks.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by ErroneousBee (611028)
          I'd say that they only quit because someone put pressure on them, not because they want to stop making money on those transactions.

          Possibly because Visa in the US is being floated on the stock exchange. I guess that is because the USA is moving in a rather insular direction, and they didnt want Visa in the rest of the world to be hit by legal problems in the USA. See the recent problems with online gambling for an example of the kind of exposures companies like Visa have if they wish to do business in the U
        • by swillden (191260) * <shawn-ds@willden.org> on Thursday October 19, 2006 @11:31AM (#16502157) Homepage Journal

          Visa makes money off of every transaction.

          "Visa" doesn't make money on transactions. The various organizations who own the Visa brand are banking consortia. Their job is to manage the brand name, define payment standards, validate implementations of those standards, and generally do whatever makes sense to facilitate their membership's ability to make money. The Visa organizations are primarily funded by dues paid by the member banks.

          When you make a Visa payment, the money passes through two or three sets of hands. It goes like this:

          1. The merchant submits the transaction to a bank the merchant has a relationship with. This bank is called the "merchant acquirer". Some of the big merchant acquirers don't do any retail or wholesale banking, but are just transaction processors. Nevertheless, they're banks. They have to be.
          2. The merchant acquirer submits the transaction either to a clearinghouse (which, with one notable exception, is not really related to any official Visa organization) or directly to the bank that issued your credit card (called the "issuer").
          3. The issuer validates the transaction and sends a notification back to the merchant acquirer (possibly via the clearinghouse).
          4. The merchant acquirer (eventually) puts money into the merchant's bank account.
          5. The issuer sends you a bill.

          The merchant acquirer and issuer both make money on the transaction, and the clearinghouse, if any, takes another small slice. The issuer obviously also makes money on finance charges if you don't pay your balance off right away.

          All of this just highlights the fact that none of these players have any interest at all in shutting off the flow of money to allofmp3. The acquirer that allofmp3 uses is a Russian bank, so they have no legal issues, and plenty of interest in taking a slice of allofmp3's business. The various issuing banks are individually anonymous in the situation, they figure their only responsibility is to make sure that the transactions are not fraudulent -- mainly because they don't want to end up potentially footing the bill for the fraud. The clearinghouses just want to push transactions from point A to point B.

          Each player can point to the others and say that it ought to be their decision as to whether or not payments from a certain merchant should be accepted. The most logical decisionmaker as to the legitimacy of the merchant is the acquirer -- and that's the Russian bank for whom there's no legal issue!

          I find it quite surprising that Visa International decided to step in and order their members (the organizations who pay them!) not to accept allofmp3.com payments.

          • by yppiz (574466) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @12:08PM (#16502833) Homepage
            Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe Visa (the corporate entity) also runs VisaNet, the network over which Visa transactions are sent, and charges a small fee per transaction.

            Also, here is an excerpt from the Wikipedia entry for Visa [wikipedia.org] decribing Visa's complex corporate structure.

            *

            Legally, Visa comprises four non-stock, separately incorporated companies that employ 6000 people worldwide: Visa International Service Association ("VISA"), the worldwide parent entity; Visa U.S.A. Inc.; Visa Canada Association; and Visa Europe Ltd. The latter three separately incorporated regions have the status of group members of Visa International Service Association, whereas the unincorporated regions (Visa Latin America [LAC], Visa Asia Pacific and Visa Central and Eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa [CEMEA]) are divisions within VISA.

            --Pat
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by djdavetrouble (442175)
        What's amazing is that Visa ever allowed it in the first place.

        (picking myself up off the floor)
        Its amazing that a soulless multinational mega corporation took money ?
        They only fall in line when the lawyers deem the risk larger than the reward.
    • by z0idberg (888892)
      So if you live in Russia and have a VISA card can you still not use your VISA card at allofmp3 even though it is legal for you to use that site?

      Is there such a thing as a VISA card in Russia? I mean if you live there can you get a VISA card? I would guess yes but don't know for sure.

      If the legality depends on your location does it depend on where you live? the billing address of your VISA card? the location of the Bank which you have your VISA card through? or the Head office of VISA?

      Or does it just matter
      • by Pofy (471469) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:58AM (#16501579)
        >So if you live in Russia and have a VISA card can you still not use your VISA card at
        >allofmp3 even though it is legal for you to use that site?

        What does were you live have to do with it? What law makes it illegal for you to buy the music from Russia if you live in another country? Or are you claiming that USE, Turkey, Japan, South Africa (or whatever other non Russian country you might prefer) have some law forbiding you to purchase from another country? And what would that have to do with copyright who for sure doesn't have such limitations (we are talking of purchase of single number of copies of each song and for personal use, just like if you have bought the CD while in Russia and bring it home with it, just mentioning it so that you don't have to claim anything about import and I have to reply to tell about what is covered by the import part in copyright law and what is not).

    • by MartinG (52587)
      Visa has now chosen to recognize this issue and not be party to breaking the law.

      Two questions:

      1) In which jusrisdiction(s) was the law being broken?

      2) Which law(s) in that jurisdiction(s) was/were being broken?
      • by Kjella (173770)
        From what I've understood it,
        1) US
        2) Import laws (goes something like "copies that couldn't legally have been made in the US, can't be imported to the US". Since the Russian law doesn't apply in the US, you can't import copies made under that law.

        It is certainly not legal for commercial use, I don't recall seeing an exception for consumers but there might be. I think there's some similar rules on counterfeit goods, you can be fined for importing it even if you have bought it as a private consumer. Of course
        • by Pofy (471469) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @11:14AM (#16501857)
          >2) Import laws (goes something like "copies that couldn't
          >legally have been made in the US, can't be imported to the
          >US". Since the Russian law doesn't apply in the US, you
          >can't import copies made under that law.

          Why do people who don't know the law, insists on making up their own version of it? Here is a link to the relevant law you probably think you are telling about:

          http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode17/us c_sec_17_00000602----000-.html [cornell.edu]

          Note the exceptions (2), which would be applicable to anyone buying music over the net in single quantities of each work. Thus, it doesn't count as importation and the restrictions you refer to are not applicable and irrellevant.
          • *psst*
            They didn't want you to point out that bit.

            Kinda like the C&D I got from Farmers, they quoted a whole lot of crap from Title 15, but when you look there are two halves and they were quoting from the commercial half. The other half says: comparitive/critical/commentary/educational/etc. uses are exempt.

            The entire C&D with annotated commentary is available here:
            http://farmersreallysucks.com/cgi-bin/QAD_CMS.pl?p age=E1_First_Takedown.html [farmersreallysucks.com] Basically the same concept, just a different reason.
            -nB
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Pofy (471469)
      >Read that last paragraph, if you've been in the United States & using AllOfMp3.com, they've
      >been shifting legality issues to you.

      What responsability? There is no responsability for a purchaser of music that is applicable. A buyer is for example not distributing the material. Use in it self is not a copyright issue. So what specifically are you thinking of?

      >Visa has now chosen to recognize this issue and not be party to breaking the law.

      What law are you as a buyer breaking? None.

      >However, th
      • sentence you wrote:

        You are buying the music in Russia. Russian law applies.

        Once you bring your purchase into the US, US law applies. For instance, it might be perfectly legal to buy a fully automatic AK-47 in Russia (I suspect not, but it makes a simple example) , but importing such a weapon into the US would require jumping through numerous hoops. Indeed, unless you're a registered firearms collector or have the appropriate license, owning such a firearm would be against the law and you could expect the

        • by Pofy (471469) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @11:26AM (#16502069)
          >Once you bring your purchase into the US, US law applies.

          Yes, but please tell what specific law you have in mind, there really is none.

          >The fact that you bought the item in Russia doesn't necessarily
          >mean that Russian law applies.

          The purchase is done under Russian law if done in Russia. That is allofmp3's responsability. If a person then wants to use what they buy there to break the law in another country is that persons responsability. In the case in question, there is no such law violation though since it is perfectly legal to brgin a copy of a song or music into USA from other countries.

          >I'm not a lawyer, but I believe that the AllOfMp3 site violates
          >the spirit, if not the letter, of international copyright law.

          What spirit? Are you claiming that there is a spirit that says any product with a work protected by copyright can not be moved from one country to another? I suppose someone should tell that to all the stores on international airports selling music CDs. For the record, no, there is no such restriction or anything at all about such restrictions in copyright laws, treaties or that like.

          >That being the case, you're correct that the user isn't breaking the law. It's just a
          >convenient way for AllOfMp3 to shift the blame:

          So allofmp3 is not breaking the law and the buyer is not breaking the law, who is and what law?

          >We can't be responsible if US or EU users are downloading content that they shouldn't.

          What do you mean "shouldn't"? Either there is some law making it illegal or there is not. It happens to exist no such law.
        • Actually proper firearms are very much restricted in Russia. Often, guards are reduced to using gas-guns to get over the issues with getting a hand-gun permit. The guards you see with hand-guns are usually moonlighting security-forces/military. Unfortunately, there is a very active black market in weapons so theoretically banned weapons such as automatics are easy to obtain there. I can't see a black market weapon's dealer taking anything other than dollars, cash.
    • They have a new ad slogan:

      "Mastercard, it is everywhere the law is gray."
    • by slughead (592713)
      The user bears sole responsibility for any use and distribution of all materials received from AllOFMP3.com. This responsibility is dependent on the national legislation in each user's country of residence. The Administration of AllOFMP3.com does not possess information on the laws of each particular country and is not responsible for the actions of foreign users.

      Read that last paragraph, if you've been in the United States & using AllOfMp3.com, they've been shifting legality issues to you. Visa has now
  • Thanks Visa! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:19AM (#16501035)
    For those who don't want to (or can't) buy allofmp3's DRM-free music, they are providing DRM-laden music that can be played only within a restricted player provided by the website." ... that anybody can promply record/reencode DRM-free.
  • Beatport (Score:5, Insightful)

    by GroovBird (209391) * on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:21AM (#16501077) Homepage Journal
    Not to worry.

    I never had any issues with paying for my music. I had issues with the DRM that was applied to that music. AllofMP3 offered that same music without DRM. If they turn out to be illegal (because the group they pay royalties to turns out not to have to license the music to AllOfMP3) then so be it.

    I found an alternative, that better suits my taste of music and is completely legit, but a lot more expensive.

    http://www.beatport.com/ [beatport.com]

    Dave
    • by MightyYar (622222)
      I guess that's okay if you are looking for beat-heavy stuff... kind of a niche, though, and more expensive then the iTunes route. Kind of a neat flash interface. Very fast.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by jmc (4639)
      If you're into electronic music, you really can't do better than Beatport.com:

      1) No DRM.
      2) Legal (with no grey areas like AllOfMp3.com).
      3) Multiple high quality encoding options (192 AAC being my choice).
      4) Long, high quality previews.
      5) A genius Flash interface that lets you browse, preview a song, continue browsing while it's previewing, add to card, and checkout -- all without a single browser refresh.

      It IS usually twice as expensive as iTunes. But it's still a good deal, given most of the tracks are pr
  • by OakDragon (885217) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:23AM (#16501093) Journal
    "On the heals of allofmp3.com's press conference..."

    * groan *

    My inner grammar Nazi is involuntarily goose-stepping after reading that.

  • pain (Score:3, Funny)

    by Ryan Monster (767204) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:23AM (#16501095)
    My heels hurt from reading that summary. I hope they heal soon.
  • PayPal? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by tecker (793737)
    Could allofmp3.com route such purchases through paypal?

    I realize it probably would not work but it is a posibility.
    • Could allofmp3.com route such purchases through paypal? I realize it probably would not work but it is a posibility.
      At a point in the past they did accept PayPal funds. Their site doesn't even mention Paypal anymore. Paypal probably wouldn't allow transfers to allofmp3 for similar reasons that Visa won't allow it now.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Kadin2048 (468275)
      As anyone who's used PayPal can probably attest to, they're extremely aggressive about closing accounts down over the slightest thing.

      I doubt AllOfMp3's accounts there lasted ten minutes.

      I think XROST is their way of getting around the financing problems of directly accepting credit cards or PayPal. You can (apparently?) buy XROST "cards" using either a credit card or PayPal, and then turn around and use that card at AllOfMp3 to load your account.

      I'm not sure whether this is a totally safe tactic; it seems
  • Aaaayyyyyy. (Score:4, Funny)

    by Rob T Firefly (844560) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:31AM (#16501209) Homepage Journal
    For those who don't want to (or can't) buy allofmp3's DRM-free music, they are providing DRM-laden music that can be played only within a restricted player provided by the website."
    What's Russian for "jump the shark?"
  • by bteeter (25807) <brian@@@brianteeter...com> on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:31AM (#16501213)
    No one wants DRM music. That was a primary reason everyone used AllofMP3.com. That and the price of course. Now instead of AllofMP3 customers paying a small fee for music, I bet a lof of them will hit Shareaza and the file share networks again.

    Great move RIAA...

    Take care,

    Brian
    • by Yvan256 (722131)
      Everyone used AllOfMP3.com? Are you sure? How many people (outside of Slashdot) even knew it existed? And from those that knew it existed and used it, how many knew it wasn't legal even though they were paying for the songs?

      And you're right, nobody wants DRM music. Apple's iTunes Store proves this with only 1.5 billion songs downloaded so far.

      My guess is that this move by the RIAA won't increase the P2P traffic by more than 0.01%.
      • by z0idberg (888892)
        Nobody wants DRM music.

        1.5 billion songs downloaded from iTunes only means a lot of people just don't know it yet.

        They will find out when their PC crashes and they lose all the music on their hard drive, get a new computer, install iTunes then auto-sync their IPOD and lose all their music. Or when in a few years there is another cool non-apple media player on the market and they try to move their music to their new player and find they can't.

        Thats when people that already hate DRM and know a few of the tric
        • DRM has absolutely nothing to do with the iTunes service - making sure that your files are safely backed up is your problem, not theirs.

          They will find out when their PC crashes and they lose all the music on their hard drive, get a new computer, install iTunes then auto-sync their IPOD and lose all their music.

          Or they could just back up their music files and restore them on their new computer. iTunes has a utility that does this. All the user has to do once they've been restored is authorize the computer

      • by rikkus-x (526844)
        14% market share in the UK, apparently: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/05/12/alllofmp3_ uk_download_demand/ [theregister.co.uk]
      • by Pofy (471469)
        >And from those that knew it existed and used it,
        >how many knew it wasn't legal even though they
        >were paying for the songs?

        What was illegal about it? What law was being broken? How? And by whom?
    • by Lumpy (12016)
      Bah why?

      I havent downloaded new music online for 2 years. Myself and a group of friends simply ship around a few USB hard drives. I just recieved 180gig of music I do not have from a friend in the best mp3 quality I can get and the id3 tags are all right. I wil lbe loading on about 20 gigs that another friend does not have and ship the drive along after I am done.

      Easier, faster, better quality and the RIAA cant detect it. PSP sucks... F2F is far better.
  • wow. just yesterday (seriously) I went back to that site to buy some more music. I had a small balance and added more funds to it. I noticed that visa WAS removed. was this an adblock thing? check firefox - nope. was it a javascript thing (checks my setting; nope, not that either). the visa pulldown just wasn't there anymore! I had a credit card that I used for stuff like this and I couldn't use it. I had to search for a MC card that I don't use anymore but is still valid.

    I was able to update my pay
  • alternative (Score:5, Insightful)

    by dhuff (42785) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:34AM (#16501255)
    Looks like you can point your browser back to Mother Russia at Alltunes.com [alltunes.com] and be back in business pretty quick (incl. payment with Visa).
  • *sigh*

    Oh well, it was fun while it lasted

    Sound of P2P application starting up
  • I just tried with my maestro card and that was declined too.
  • by edmicman (830206) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:49AM (#16501451) Homepage Journal
    I'll just stick to sending them envelopes of cash like I've always done!
  • by krell (896769) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:51AM (#16501493) Journal
    Now I'm going to have to all the way to Russia with cash and bring back a suitecase full of MP3s. As long as I can get past the MP3-sniffing dogs at La Guardia, I should be OK.
  • by Uninvited Guest (237316) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @10:53AM (#16501513)
    FWIW, remember that allofmp3.com claims to be "broadcasting" music on demand over the Internet, under the broadcast laws in Russia. Allofmp3.com pays its royalties based on those broadcast rules. This is similar to how ASCAP, BMI, and SESAC work with broadcast radio stations in this country; the royalties are sent to an agency which distributes the proceeds directly to the artists. The RIAA and others are claiming that allofmp3.com is duplicating and distributing recordings without paying for the rights to do so. Depending on how Russian law on broadcast rights is worded, allofmp3.com may be perfectly legitimate.
    • Also, under Russian joined the international copyright convention with various exceptions to the normal rules. For example, non-Russian works produced before 1970 (I think) have no copyright protection at all for Russian distributors. Copyright's all just an artificial government monopoly anyway, I'm glad Russia plays by their own rules.
  • they are providing DRM-laden music that can be played only within a restricted player provided by the website.

    /me Starts Stopwatch

    Crack coming in 5...4...3...

  • On the heals of allofmp3.com's press conference trying to clean up its image, Visa has suspended its credit card service to allofmp3.com.

    So who's going to foot the bill now then ?

    Seriously, what do /. editors get paid and where do I apply?
  • I didn't know it was hurt. It's good to know that they're doing better now. I suppose this is due to that vaunted Russian healthcare system, which is not only healing citizens who can afford to pay, but is now healing companies that are suffering persecution in the West.

    I'm so glad this didn't come on the heels of some other bad news.
  • I am surprised that ICANN hasn't removed their DNS entry like they are about to do for spamhaus.com. I am sure they can be sued in the USA for copyright infringement.
  • My $0.02 (Score:5, Insightful)

    by MyLoveIsAJoke (964503) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @11:02AM (#16501631)
    allofmp3.com = Beautiful business model. If it is truly not legitimate, this should be a cue for a ligit company to start up stateside using a similar model. RIAA = Epitome of how an organization should not be run for 3 reasons. #1 is they screw over thier cash cows (the "artists"). #2 it screws over its buyers (us). #3 Thier suckyness is impacting the health of thier business, and will eventually, although it'll take a while and require alot of kicking and screaming, they will fail. Had they created a site like allofmp3.com in 1996 when I began using electronic copies of music...they could have saved themselves. iTunes sucks. Plain and simple. iTunes doesn't carry much of anything I listen to, its DRM is a pain in the balls, and $0.99 is too much to pay for a track with the fraction of the overhead of a record (conventional)store. That is all I have to say.
  • Is it just me or do other people notice that /. is late by about a day or sometimes more in reporting news stories. In the case of this story, I read about it yesterday on the New York Times... There were other times when I would read something in the WSJ and see it on Slashdot two days later. Makes a feller question certain things..

    --
    http://unk1911.blogspost.com/ [blogspost.com]
  • by Hap76 (995519) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @01:25PM (#16504027)
    Isn't their tagline "it's everywhere you want to be"...except what they think might be illegal, or wrong, or immoral....

    If you want to make brand money as a cash replacement (which I assume is what their money cards are attempting to do), then you have to be a open carrier (allowing the end users to deal with the legal responsibility of their use of money). Once Visa picks and chooses what uses of their currency to allow, I have no way to know what the value of their currency is (because I don't know what I can do with it), and there's less point to using it over using cash (potential safety is helpful, but like a gift card, limitation in usage is a significant loss in value).

    By announcing this loudly, they're telling their cash card holders that what they're holding isn't really cash, though Visa wishes to sell it as such. Maybe Visa's users will get the message.
  • Hypocrisy (Score:4, Insightful)

    by MrSteveSD (801820) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @03:27PM (#16506329)
    I think you have to be consistent with the application of this mindset. If it's not ok for consumers to shop around for countries with the most convenient laws, then it should not be ok for companies to do the same thing. That means no more situating factories in countries where working hours and conditions would breach your own laws.

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