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Is PC World Still Worth the Subscription? 110

Posted by Cliff
from the IT-mags-in-today's-wired-world dept.
alexwcovington asks: "I've subscribed to PC World magazine since 1996, but my subscription is up for renewal this year, and I'm not sure if I need it anymore. I love reading the Stephen Manes rants and hoarding back issues in my closet, but I find myself getting virtually all the hard information I used to turn to PC World for from the Internet. What's the relevance of a print IT publication in modern times?"
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Is PC World Still Worth the Subscription?

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  • huh? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Mr2cents (323101) on Saturday September 30, 2006 @04:30AM (#16256833)
    How should I know wheither you should subscribe to a magazine or not? What's next? Ask Slashdot: should I wear my green T-shirt or my yellow one? Make up your own mind! We're all different! :)
    • by pimpimpim (811140)
      No I'm not!
    • Make up your own mind! We're all different! :)


      I'm not. [uncleclive.co.uk]
    • What's next? Ask Slashdot: should I wear my green T-shirt or my yellow one?

      If you're afraid of seeing that happen, wear YELLOW.
      If you're all for it growing, wear GREEN.
    • Ask Slashdot: should I wear my green T-shirt or my yellow one?

      Wear your pink one.

      http://pinkforoctober.org/ [pinkforoctober.org] Real men wear pink.

      I now have a pink one. My wife washed it with a red shirt.
  • No. (Score:3, Informative)

    by Threni (635302) on Saturday September 30, 2006 @04:30AM (#16256835)
    Most of those mags are readable online. Online suppliers advertise products more cheaply than those in the magazine, and I don't have any more respect for the reviewers in the mag than online, because you're trusting people who are likely to not want to upset the manufacturers and retailers who supply the magazine with review kit that they can subsequently keep, rather than people online who've bought the stuff with their own money and used it - often for extended periods of time. Also, you get much more in depth reviews, with much more accurate information online, especially if you surf around and check out a few sites. Finally, you're left with a few hundred pages of paper to through away at the end of the month. I see no point in buying computer magazines any longer.
  • by TVAFR (992256)
    In my opinion, no. I quit reading compuer magazines in mid-90-ies because they do not really give anything new that is not present in the Internet. And besides, the magazines publich everything on the internet as well. Plus on internet you have various sites like Slashdot that first, filter only the most interesting articles, and second, provide very insightfull and witty discussion, third, help you understand whether article is a genuine news article or a hidden advertising for one big company or another.
    • by stevey (64018)

      Agreed.

      I stopped buying computer magazines when they started becoming more about advertising and superficial reviews. I remember in the "old days" magazines used to have courses on programming, and really much more thorough reviews. Even the letter sections have decreased in size/technical content.

      Now they look prettier, but the content is severely watered down compared to things you can find online.

      Its a shame, because I do appreciate having something physical to read in my hands, but the peak of con

      • I remember in the "old days" magazines used to have courses on programming, and really much more thorough reviews.

        Like the print edition of Byte magazine [byte.com] ?

        Its a shame, because I do appreciate having something physical to read in my hands, but the peak of content has passed.

        Same here. If I'm going to read something more than a page I'd rather it be hard copy not on my monitor. Admittedly my monitor is a CRT and LCDs may be better but I don't know if they are. I'm hoping to get one by the end of t

      • by dosius (230542)
        I liked some of the older mags, COMPUTE!, couple other mags, hell earlier issues of PC Computing either, they had typeins... then by 1996, they were just ads for ads...

        -uso.
    • by antifoidulus (807088) on Saturday September 30, 2006 @05:08AM (#16256969) Homepage Journal
      Not to mention that on slashdot, unlike print media, if you miss a story it will be re-run in a few days(sometimes a few hours if you are lucky)
      • by Yvan256 (722131)
        Not to mention that on slashdot, unlike print media, if you miss a comment it will be re-run in a few days (sometimes a few hours if you are lucky).
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by rbochan (827946)
      And as a bonus, every week you get 47 links to Roland Piquepaille's blog.

  • Well I now read a weekly magazine (Micromart, a UK computer magazine), mostly for buses and planes. Monthly magazines are just too old now, everything has been reported/reviewed elsewhere long before.
    • by Marcion (876801)
      Also Micromart costs a quid or two, not seven quid. And of course it doesn't come with a CD full of crap shareware which you could download anyway.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by TheRaven64 (641858)
      I used to read Computer Shopper back in the '90s. It had three things going for it back then:
      1. Free-beer software on the cover. Later this turned mainly to shareware or things I could download anyway if I wanted to (which I usually didn't).
      2. News. Later this became 'things I had read about a month earlier online.'
      3. Up-to-date complete catalogues for lots of different computer suppliers. Now I check prices online.

      I cancelled my subscription about five years ago, and haven't missed it. For the last year I

  • by NexFlamma (919608)
    In the current world, and in the near future, printed news, magazines and humor is going to be completely superceded by online sources simply because the internet is cheaper, updated more frequently and available 24 hours a day.

    You'll have your hold-outs who desire a physical product, or the aesthetics/tactile feedback of paper, but with the coming advances in e-ink and e-paper, it's only a matter of time before paper media will be relegated to the realm of the courier on horseback riding from town to tow
    • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward
      It may come to pass that the newspapers are no longer published, but I for one detest being tethered to the internet just to get my information.

      I don't want to sit in front of a PC screen to find out what's on at the movies - I want to be able to look at my newspaper while waiting on yet another two minute traffic light and decide whether I should divert to the Mall Movie and see the latest release.

      And, do I want to lug around a 7 lb laptop, or a 6 ounce paperback book to read the latest Sci-Fi thriller on
      • 100% agreed, even the e-ink type devices cannot compare to a for pennies (or free) newspaper to read on the bus.
        The new might be a couple of hours out of date but its enough of a review to know what happened last night.

        Ontopic, unless there is something specific in a monthly magazine I would avoid it nowadays.
        The world does move faster nowadays.
      • (Would I even want to take the laptop at all to the vacation destination?)

        Would you even be allowed to bring a laptop on board with you? I'd love to be able to take my laptop and have WiMax access while on vacation, but unless I were allowed to bring it with me into the passenger cabin I'd leave it at home. I wouldn't put it into cargo, even if airlines covered damage but we aren't now.

        Now, as for reading, I'd rather have the book or magazine to read.

        Falcon
      • Books are one thing. I prefer to get my books in physical form as compared to trying to find ebooks of it, yes. But an IT rag is quite another thing. Even ignoring the advertisement side of things, everything you read about is going to be between a week and a month old. Online, the instant anyone finds out about it is the instant you find out about it (usually via Slashdot or Technocrati or whatever).
    • by drsquare (530038)
      simply because the internet is cheaper, updated more frequently and available 24 hours a day.


      Cheaper? The newspaper on the bus is free. No electronic device can come close to that price. I can read a newspaper in all sorts of situations where it would be unfeasible to take a laptop.
  • 'Nuff said.
  • I haven't subscribed to any computer magazines in about a decade.
    • The fact that this guy actually needs to PAY for his subscription shows that he's a mark; if you're anybody with any purchasing power, your subscription will be free. (In fact, it's really hard to get publishers to QUIT mailing you their rags.)

      I think its equally odd that there's a market for computer books in 2006, but that's another story...
      • Over the last month its been 'renewal time' - I swear, I tell them "No thank you, I don't read it" they put me on the "pester til he caves" list. (I haven't yet, though)

        ALL I DO IS RECYCLE THE DAMNED THINGS! (Maybe I'll just say that...)

        "But sir, our magazine is full of informa..." "I don't read it."

        AAAARRRGGGHHHH
      • I think its equally odd that there's a market for computer books in 2006, but that's another story...

        Unlike some, you maybe, I prefer to read hardcopy, a book, if it's more than a page. Even when I read something online if it is more than a page in length I will print it out to read. Unless and until displays are as easy on my eyes as paper I will continue to prefer books. Even when they get that way I'll still prefer reading books, I don't need to have a computer running to read a book, and I take ea

  • real magazine (Score:5, Interesting)

    by nomel (244635) <turdNO@SPAMinorbit.com> on Saturday September 30, 2006 @04:49AM (#16256911) Homepage Journal
    Subscribe to a real magazine! Say...New Scientist! Once a week...incredibly up to date. There's been MANY times where I read something in it to hear it on the news a few days later. Seems to be a source that everyone (including Slashdot) seems to use.
    • Re:real magazine (Score:4, Informative)

      by martijnd (148684) on Saturday September 30, 2006 @08:39AM (#16257709)
      New Scientist is a good one, I second the economist [economist.com] as a teatime reader. Their Tech/Science articles are in touch with reality, and a lot of their articles end up being quoted on Slashdot weeks later.
      • Somewhat off-topic, but last time I followed any of the pop-sci magazines, Scientific American seemed a closer to the science than the more summary articles in New Scientist, which usually struck me as decent overviews but lacking any real depth. (I'm not from the US, BTW; this isn't some sort of national pride thing.)

        We get New Scientist at work these days, and some of the articles are quite interesting surveys of a particular area for those who don't study this stuff full time any more, but the general

      • New Scientist is a good one

        I agree heartily, it's informative (expensive though, outside the UK :c(), intelligent yet entertaining in a humorist way (just like we all want to be, don't we?). MacAddict is another story though: middle of the 90's GOOD, YUMMY, nowadays BAD, PTEW! Time Magazine: good too. And cheap. Bit biassed though. Anyway I would not subscribe to a computer magazine unless I really wánted it. If I doubted, I wouldn't, and save the money to send it to http://www.justgiving.com/phrichar [justgiving.com]

      • New Scientist is a good one, I second the economist [economist.com] as a teatime reader.

        Though I read "New Scientist" and "Nature" I prefer Sciam for science. Now, I also like "The Economist" and if I could justify the cost I'd subscribe to it as well.

        Falcon
      • New Scientist is a good one, I second the economist as a teatime reader.

        The Economist? Hard to take them seriously. They predicted [economist.com] $5 per barrel oil when price was $10. And now it's north of $60. And before anyone says "9/11", or "Iraq war", this chart [wtrg.com] shows that their article pretty much called the absolute bottom. Oil went from $10 to $30 between their article and 9/11. The Economist just overlooked the fact that India and China were growing and would need increased supplies of oil. Duh.
        • The Economist? Hard to take them seriously. They predicted $5 per barrel oil when price was $10.

          What? They've been writing for 150 years and it's hard to take them seriously because in 1999 they once guessed wrong about the future? You ignore, of course, that they owned up to the mistake [economist.com] by the end of the year. They examined the reasons behind it, and looked at several other mistaken predictions as well in an article titled, "Goofs: We wuz wrong".

          Personally, I think it's great that they're willing to be co
  • PC World was/is a great magazine if you are a novice. I learned a lot when I started from PC's because of my subscription, and I can see how it can help a lot of people. I just outgrew it eventually, and it didn't hit the more technical details I needed. It just depends on what you are looking for out of it.
  • You didn't mention if you have a laptop that you can balance skillfully on your knees. What are you going to read in the bathroom?
  • by astrashe (7452) on Saturday September 30, 2006 @05:34AM (#16257033) Journal
    I don't know about PC World. I think if I ran Windows, it might be worthwhile, but I don't know.

    I really like linux magazines, and I think they offer good counter examples to the print dynamic that a lot of people describe. Yes, it's true the web is free, and yes, it's updated all the time. But I find that print magazines tend to point out things to me I hadn't noticed before, and that they often have pretty good writeups.

    It's not that you can't find information about some software project on the web -- it's that you might have heard of that project before, so you don't know to google it. The magazines do a good job of flagging interesting new stuff.

    My main problem with these mags is that the ones from Europe are priced at insane levels here in the States. I was looking at one the other day on the newsstand, and I wanted it, but it was something like $15.99. It comes with a DVD, but what's that worth when you have broadband?

    The problem isn't that the content isn't good, and the problem isn't that $16 is a huge amount of money in the scheme of things. The problem is that you sort of feel taken advantage of at that price. No one wants to feel like a chump, but at $16, that's where you end up.

    But a linux journal subscription, which is something like $25 for a year, is a great deal.
    • by AndyCap (97274)

      My main problem with these mags is that the ones from Europe are priced at insane levels here in the States. I was looking at one the other day on the newsstand, and I wanted it, but it was something like $15.99. It comes with a DVD, but what's that worth when you have broadband?

      That's a major issue in .no as well, unfortunately there's a de facto monopoly on magazines here. So Linux Journal comes in at USD14+ and that's got no cover cd. The magazines that have some junk on the cover jump up to USD23 - 30.

      • by really? (199452)
        Shipping paper around the globe is costly though, but subscription prices are much lower than getting it in the store.

        That's why any publication worth its salt would beam the contents to a local "print shop" and have it distributed locally. As far as I know, anyway.

    • by dramaley (20773) *
      Like you i am in the US and have looked at the European Linux magazines. They are often better than US magazines in terms of their content, but the price has always been a deterrent. However, they usually have fewer ads than US magazines, and the ads they do have are less obnoxious. That almost makes it worth the high price.
  • I gave up on PC World back in about 1993. Back then it was a pile of commercial shite. I'm certain it's devolved even further on the evolutionary ladder since then.
  • yeah well (Score:4, Interesting)

    by MaggieL (10193) on Saturday September 30, 2006 @06:45AM (#16257253)
    I miss Byte magazine. It was vastly better than PCMag.
    • by TopShelf (92521)
      And don't forget dear old SoftSide [old-computers.com]. I remember waiting for each issue, eagerly awaiting new stuff to type into my Atari 400 (always a pain because most programs were for TRS-80's or Apple's, so some tweaking was usually required to get the programs to run).
    • I miss Byte magazine. It was vastly better than PCMag.

      I miss the early Byte magazine. Later Byte was just another trade rag. "15 dot matrix printers compared." [YAWWWWWN!] Boo-ring.

      Byte still owes me for a half year subscription, from when they finally bailed. I never got notice of anything they were offering to replace it with.

      • by really? (199452)
        Hear, hear. (Including the fact that they screwed me out of half a year worth of mags.)
      • by MaggieL (10193)
        I miss the early Byte magazine. Later Byte was just another trade rag.

        That's true enough. But back in the days of the Robert Tinney covers, or even earlier when it was still thin enough to be stapled.

        I remeber the first time I saw a copy of Byte...it was in the hands of another geek at the MITS Mobile Computer Caravan...Micheal Hunter was touring an Altair 8800 and a Teletype around the country in an RV.
      • Byte still owes me for a half year subscription, from when they finally bailed. I never got notice of anything they were offering to replace it with.

        You didn't miss much. I had just resubscribed (a 3 year sub iirc) because I liked their cross-platform focus. So what did they send as a fullfillment? A Windows magazine! What the hell, at least I use windows at work... A while later this one folded also and I ended up getting a video game magazine. I am not a gamer, so I ended up passing these on to a cow-orke

        • I do agree that that Byte in its last years was a mere shadow of its heyday (Circuit Cellar era).

          Hey, at least Steve Ciarcia publishes "Circuit Cellar" as a magazine itself now. Only if Jerry Pournelle came out with a "Chaos Manor" magazine.

          Falcon
    • Ah, another one who misses "Byte, the small and homebuilt computers magazine". Gosh it seems like ages ago when I first read it, back in the mid to late '70s. I really liked Steve Ciarcia's "Circuit Cellar" and Jerry Pournelle's "Chaos Manor". If "Byte" started a print edition again I'd subscribe in a heartbeat.

      Falcon
      • by Cato (8296)
        Jerry Pournelle's self-indulgent pieces were the only thing I didn't like about Byte - just about everything else was perfect.
        • Jerry Pournelle's self-indulgent pieces were the only thing I didn't like about Byte - just about everything else was perfect.

          His columns made for light reading and they showed what could be done by regular users.

          Falcon
  • Is it just me, or is Wired these days only 30 pages of editorial content and 150 pages glossy ads?

    D

    • It's like Architectural Digest: not meant to be read, per se, but placed on a coffee table nonchalantly so as to impress guests. Do you think anyone who has had their house featured in AD actually *subscribes* to AD? What little leisure they have is spent reading the targeted trade magazines for whatever industry they are captains of.

      Anyone who is so "technorati" as to be within Wired's alleged target audience is not reading paper.

       
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by tgd (2822)
      Wow, they've added that much content in the last six or seven years?

  • by checkyoulater (246565) on Saturday September 30, 2006 @08:08AM (#16257543) Journal
    And the reason is simple. A magazine is the perfect size to take into the toilet with you. Unless you want to sit there with a laptop? A magazine is the ultimate in portability, as well.
    • The 4 page Fry's section in the local paper works for me in that regard. By the way, are all Fry's as disorganized as the one in Wilsonville, OR? Despite or because of this I find I anticipate a visit to Fry's as much as our semi-annual camping trips.
      • Well, we don't have Fry's here in Toronto, but I get a Best Buy and Future Shop flyer weekly. Usually about 10 pages or so. And I do agree with you, it serves the purpose quite nicely. But sometimes, I need more than 10 pages. As far as the organization at Fry's goes, I suppose the toilet is as good a place to ponder it as any.

      • By the way, are all Fry's as disorganized as the one in Wilsonville, OR?

        They're hit and miss. The one in Fountain Valley, CA, is pretty well-organized, and doesn't have a lot of open space to traverse. The one in Anaheim, CA, is less well-organized (the CD section is split in two by a pseudo-cafe), has much more open space (an issue when running in for a part at 8:58pm, which I do more often than I should), and lacks some very basic parts that a large computer store should have (such as SATA-PATA adapters
    • by mkiwi (585287)
      Is that a real poncho? I mean, is that a Mexican poncho or is that a Sears poncho?

      Kudos for being one of the few people who actually know that quote (Frank Zappa - Cosmik Debris).
      I wish the record companies would get their act together again so I can buy Zappa's stuff on iTunes once more.
      On a related note, Zappa died in 1993 of prostate cancer. Breast cancer is not the only thing people have to worry about.

      • On a related note, Zappa died in 1993 of prostate cancer. Breast cancer is not the only thing people have to worry about.

        Offtopic, but hear hear. Men are more likely to get prostate cancer than women are to get breast cancer, but in Australia at least, prostate cancer only receives 8% of the funding that breast cancer does. What's wrong with this picture?

      • Close, but the quote is actually from Camarillo Brillo, off of Overnite Sensation.

        • You know, I had no idea he mentioned the poncho in Cosmik Debris as well. Should have listened before I posted. Unfortunately, I don't own that album, so I really couldn't. I'll be sure to listen, though. Luckily my boss is a Zappa nut, and he has everything. Well, mostly. Now that we are officially off topic...

    • by dbIII (701233)
      The answer is simple - eat more fruit and you won't be spending enough time in the toilet to read a magazine.
    • by turgid (580780)

      A magazine is the perfect size to take into the toilet with you. Unless you want to sit there with a laptop? A magazine is the ultimate in portability, as well.

      But can you really stand the embarrassment of walking into a shop and buying that sort of magazine?

  • by ion_ (176174) on Saturday September 30, 2006 @08:11AM (#16257555) Homepage

    I find myself getting virtually all the hard information I used to turn to PC World for from the Internet.

    You wouldn't steal a magazine, would you? Downloading information from the Internet is no different than walking into a magazine store, stuffing a magazine in your pocket, and walking out without paying for it. What you do hurts the magazine industry. With the new legislation (paid by the Magazine Industry Association of America), you can (and will) be sued in criminal court.

    Remember, kids: downloading information from the Internet is stealing.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by TubeSteak (669689)
      Downloading information from the Internet is no different than walking into a magazine store, stuffing a magazine in your pocket, and walking out without paying for it.
      The latest thing is to walk into a magazine store, take pictures of the pages with your cellphone and read them later without paying for it.

      I think I read that from a photographed PC World article a while back.

      UID 176,174
      Get with the times man.
      • by alexdw (65033)
        You photograph the articles? Back in my day, we had to sneak a notebook into the store, and copy the articles down in pencil.
  • The only magazines I still carry a subscription on are IEEE Spectrum (comes with the IEEE membership), IEEE Computer (the IEEE computer society magazine), and IEEE Micro (the IEEE computer society mag dedicated to microprocessors).. The rest just seem pointless. The IEEE publications are available online as well so even those are not necessary, but I like to read em while dropping off friends at the pool.

    I used to have a subscription for sysadmin magazine, which I enjoyed, but I dropped it because whoever t
  • thanks lenovo! :-p
  • I think the computer print media is dead. Quite simply, the magazines that I used to read have really devolved into advertisement-fests with little to no real content. Plus, by the time the magazine hits the streets the information contained therein is actually quite seriously out of date. Said information is quite freely available online at various news sites... and so long as you don't limit yourself to a single news source for technology (like Slashdot!) then you'll get most of the information you requir
    • I have a list of sites I check daily (of which Slash is one), and sites I check bi-weekly (like arstechnica). There's also a few Apple specific sites I check up on occasionally being a Mac user (appleinsider, macrumours etc.). I get a pretty well-rounded viewpoint I think on most upcoming tech, and I can make a decision on my future direction in technology from this.

      Question, will those websites still be open if the magazine folds? I plan on switching to Macs and get a MacBook Pro when Apple releases on

      • A good question, but one that the magazine publishers need to ask instead of the readers. It's really down to them to find a new business model, one that works in the modern age. If not, there are plenty of other sources of information that you can go to. Are the sites I mentioned associated with a magazine? Hmm...

        OT: I've been well impressed with my Yonah-based Macbook pro. The only problem I've had with it so far is I have a flaky Bluetooth module (I'll call this in to Apple when I can afford to be withou
        • A good question, but one that the magazine publishers need to ask instead of the readers. It's really down to them to find a new business model, one that works in the modern age. If not, there are plenty of other sources of information that you can go to. Are the sites I mentioned associated with a magazine? Hmm...

          I don't know if the sites you cite have print mags, but some like the subject of this article, "PC World", is a print magazine. While print is "old" and websites can be kept up to date many of

  • I used to work as a computer technician and towards the end of that job I was givin about a years worth of PC World by one of my clients. I'm not usually into magazines, but I do read a lot about tech.

    Anyway, I got nothing out of the magazines I looked at. The information within was rather scant and I found my own experience with a lot of the equipment reviewed proved only that the reviewers weren't spending enough time with the requipment to write very informative reviews (the article I am thinking of in q
  • What really annoys me about computer magazines nowadays (apart from them being mostly spam you have to pay for) is that they do seem to arrive from the future, but carry news from the past. Every single one seems to arrive a few months before its time and carries `news' you could have read on the internet a few months earlier. Nevertheless, there are occasionally interesting articles, but for actual information they're often not the best source. I would not go for a subscription on any of them at the moment
  • If the editors are good, they find the things I and others are interested in, and filter out the dreck. Their magazines are worthwhile.

    If they'e not, all you're paying for is a bundle of ads (;-))

    --dave

  • by Yeechang Lee (3429) <ylee@pobox.com> on Saturday September 30, 2006 @11:18AM (#16258617) Homepage
    I've subscribed to Linux Journal for almost 13 years, and long ago bought up all the back issues I could so I have a near-complete collection. For years it's been the only worthwhile print computer magazine around.
  • I gave up the paper copy of PC World in 1995, and many others since. I used to get 8-10 mags a month but I am now down to one. The reason is simple, the internet has replaced the paper. Articles are now timely and places like Slashdot make it even more timely. And if I want the article at work I don't have to go home to get it, just remember where I saw it.

    I do have a grievance with some old time online publishers with their insatiable popups and "overadvertised" presentations. I understand the need f

  • What is PC World?
  • by TechDock (558245) on Saturday September 30, 2006 @03:25PM (#16260499)
    I used to read most of the major mags back in the day - PC World, PC Mag, Byte, and a couple of others - and I wound up giving up most of them around 2000. True, you can get the same information on the web, but I don't think that's what made them go downhill.

    When the dot com boom was at its height, all the major publishers got fanatical that print was dead, everyone was going to read everything on the net, and it was time to readjust. Byte arbitrarily canceled my subscription, since they were going to a web only base. The rest of them shrank to half the page number, and what was left was mostly advertising. Even the trade rags got rid of most of their decent columnists, since they somehow concluded nobody wanted opinion pieces, basically making them boring and worthless. The only print mag I read now is Smart Computing, since they have some interesting tips and good reviews every now and again.

    No, I didn't leave print mags, they left me...

  • I'm personally against computer magazines like PC World, they're like the IT version of sensationalist "a current affairs" shows (Today Tonight/20-20/60 Minutes/Hard Copy?).. and if you had no other access to news you could read them and try and work out the truth from them.. but since you have the internet there's very little point, sites like slashdot are much more in depth (even if they are quite sensationalistic)
  • by rnturn (11092)

    Crimeny! I never subscribed to it so I never had to decide to suspend a subscription, but I even stopped buying PC World off the newsstand backin the mid/late-80s. I thought it starting sucking even back then. Byte lasted a couple of years longer before it wasn't worth the money (i.e., it started being less and less about microcomputing in general but, instead, mostly about Windows). I'm not sure what you're looking for in a hardcopy magazine. Product Reviews? Programming tips? Tutorials? I can't imagine co

  • I'd say no. It's not a particularly specialized mag. Generic hardware and software reviews are a dime a dozen.
  • I am allowing all of my computer magazine subscriptions to lapse, because, as others here have noted, the printed news is obsolete by the time it is delivered. I continue to enjoy reading books for my regular intake of vicarious horror, fantasy, and gatuitous sex and violence. My imagination is a much better creepshow than anything I have ever seen on any screen or any print media, for that matter!
  • by drlloyd11 (458569)
    I can't see what they would provide in terms of useful knowledge. That said, if you purpose is simply to have something to read on a topic that interests in certain cituations (Subway, waiting outside, etc) its as good as any.

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