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Plasma: The Next-Generation KDE Environment Review 240

Posted by Hemos
from the you-got-plasma-all-over-my-screen dept.
slashy writes, "MadPenguin has taken a quick look at Plasma, the next gen. KDE environment. 'Plasma is an ambitious project being pursued by the KDE 4 team which aims at providing a workflow-sensitive design of the user interface that improves productivity of an average KDE user. The focus is on improving the clarity and reducing the clutter present in today's desktops. The plasma development will bring together key contributors, such as the visual artists, usability experts, technology experts, programmers, and enthusiasts at a very early stage during the development process. This will enable them to create a new desktop environment that meets the requirements of novices and experts alike.'"
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Plasma: The Next-Generation KDE Environment Review

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  • Reducing clutter (Score:4, Insightful)

    by betterunixthanunix (980855) on Monday September 18, 2006 @10:02AM (#16130143)
    Let me start by saying that I have been waiting for KDE 4 since it was first announced, mainly because of it's lower memory requirements.

    Having said that, I have found that most people will clutter their desktops regardless of what the software tries to do. Remember XP's desktop cleanup wizard, which attempted to help people remove things from their desktops that they didn't use often? I still see the majority of people with hundreds of icons and files haphazardly arranged. When I helped my friend migrate to Linux, it only took him a week to turn KDE into an icon pile. Add Firefox into the mix, which drops downloads onto the desktop by default, and the battle is completely lost.

    • by tolan-b (230077) on Monday September 18, 2006 @10:09AM (#16130203)
      I think they mean UI clutter rather than clutter of the desktop 'surface'.
    • by joe 155 (937621)
      I agree, it's pretty much always the user who creates these problems, I use GNOME but I have at most 4 icons on my desktop. I used to use KDE and think I had a similar number. I wonder what they could take away which will not reduce productivity, I mean I need the computer, home and wastebasket (and my external HD is just handy to have there)

      They could stop people creating icons or files on the desktops but that will really annoy people because some just like it there.

      Shame I couoldn't get to the ar
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Zantetsuken (935350)

        somebody said in another post somewhere beneath the top of this thread:

        "toss in firefox which automatically sets downloads to the desktop, and the battle is lost"

        maybe it would help if in firefox's initial setup wizard, it prompted where you want downloads to go to - somewhere like My Documents\Downloads for Windows, and somewhere like /home/username/downloads/ for Linux with the option to change directories...

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by cp.tar (871488)

          maybe it would help if in firefox's initial setup wizard, it prompted where you want downloads to go to - somewhere like My Documents\Downloads for Windows, and somewhere like /home/username/downloads/ for Linux with the option to change directories...

          It is possible to change the default download directory rather easily... and there are extensions which help you filter and sort downloads so you can send .mp3 to ~/music, .mpg to ~/video and .doc to ~/trash.

          AFAIK downloading everything to desktop by default

        • by nuzak (959558)
          > maybe it would help if in firefox's initial setup wizard, it prompted where you want downloads to go to - somewhere like My Documents\Downloads for Windows, and somewhere like /home/username/downloads/ for Linux with the option to change directories...

          Why prompt? Just create it. The folder itself should probably be on the desktop just for ease of finding it, but at least you'd have one icon and not dozens.

          Me, I still can't figure out why firefox can't download a file or a page when I drag it from a b
          • by zapp (201236)
            I don't think firefox should follow that trend. My Documents has enough crap automatically created in there already (the My* folders, etc).

            It saves to the desktop so users that don't know where files go automatically can find them easily. Hiding it in an automatically created folder, whether it is My Documents\downloads or c:\program files\Mozilla\Firefox\Users\Default.asdfk23o4u\dow nloads ... is just arbitrary, confusing, and dumb.

            Place the files where users can see them, or ask the user where to put it
    • ...an icon pile? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by NotQuiteReal (608241) on Monday September 18, 2006 @10:15AM (#16130243) Journal
      So?

      I thought the whole idea of personal computers was to allow people to work they way they wanted to?

      You may like clean desktops while others like cluttered desktops.

      Let's start a holy war over how many icons can dance on a screen.

      • by xtracto (837672)
        Let's start a holy war over how many icons can dance on a screen.

        I agree. I myself dont like having more than the minimum of icons in the desktop, I almost never use them. I have a
        panel (self hiding) on the right with icons of the applicacions I use often (konsole, firefox, kalc, kedit, eclipse, jabref, evolution). On my windows laptop my start menu/bar is also on the right side. It is a bit bigger than the the length of the "start" button, I have some submenues [folders which you can make cascade with a re
        • by Ajehals (947354)
          Couldn't agree more - I too have a panel and the usual K menu auto hiding across the top of my screens and on my desktop I keep a few superkaramba widgets for date time and system status and news etc.. but no icons. Icons are great for sorting / viewing data files etc.. in folders but I don't see the point in having them clutter the desktop for applications - I never store any files on my desktop anyway... (each to their own I know). The one thing I cant get away from is hitting alt+f2 and launching the
    • by Eideewt (603267)
      That's why I say we get rid of the damn thing. That's what your home directory is for; there's no reason to put stuff in a useless place like the desktop as well, where it will be obscured whenever you actually start doing things.

      Of course, I don't think they were talking about desktop icons in TFA. I just wanted to throw in my anti-icon rant here.
      • by nostriluu (138310) on Monday September 18, 2006 @10:36AM (#16130430) Homepage
        I think the metaphor for the "desktop" is, ahem, a "desktop".. an intermediate place with stuff you haven't put away yet, or are actively working on, resides.

        Just putting everything in your home folder /would/ be a disaster.

        Of course, it's nice to have multiple desktops, so when you're working on a different task you can just go to a different desk.

        Hmm.. doesn't seem like you can change the Mac's desktop on the fly.

        • by cp.tar (871488)

          There's still the issue of a desktop cluttered with icons.

          I rather liked a gDesklets applet with a circular launch bar... you could create sets of launchers by theme or whatever and switch between them.
          Everything neatly organised, and the desktop remains completely free of clutter.

        • Hmm.. doesn't seem like you can change the Mac's desktop on the fly.

          Why do you feel the need to insert a random offtopic troll into an other wise perfectly good discussion?

          (sigh) Nevertheless, I feel compelled to feed it anyway; hopefully this will be the end of it:

          • It's not as if changing your virtual desktop changes your icons anyway (at least it hasn't on any system I've used), so it's irrelevant to this discussion.
          • Macs have Exposé instead of virtual desktops.
          • The next version [apple.com] of Mac OS will
          • by nostriluu (138310)
            Hey, I'm all for trolling.

            I (ab)use Virtue Desktops, I believe Desktop Manager is dead in the water.

            To this point:

            # It's not as if changing your virtual desktop changes your icons anyway (at least it hasn't on any system I've used), so it's irrelevant to this discussion.

            I wasn't speaking about existing desktop managers, I was referring to a feature that would allow Desktop contents (not application views) to change when moving between contexts (personal, project a, project, b, etc). I believe I've seen a fe

    • by Zach978 (98911)
      In KDE 3 there is an option to disable icons on the desktop, that's what I have been doing for a while...
      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by nschubach (922175)
        That's the only reason I run Active Desktop at work. One icon. The Recycle Bin. The only reason I have that there is to remind me to empty it every night. If only I had a trash can icon on my garage door.
    • by Jesselnz (866138) on Monday September 18, 2006 @11:05AM (#16130709)
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by nschubach (922175)
        It's nice to see someone publicly displaying the use of cracks, roms and serial numbers. Oh, I suppose he owns all that software...my mistake.
      • by cp.tar (871488)

        I notice that there's some empty space left... Couldn't he find anything to fill it with?

        It looks so... empty.

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by snoyberg (787126)
        Sure... sure.. you "friend"
    • Re:Reducing clutter (Score:4, Informative)

      by Knuckles (8964) <knucklesNO@SPAMdantian.org> on Monday September 18, 2006 @01:49PM (#16132262)
      Remember XP's desktop cleanup wizard, which attempted to help people remove things from their desktops that they didn't use often?

      Oh yes, very well. It is among the worst pieces of idiocy created in the name of helping inexperienced users I know. Apparently it is purely date-driven and disregards the existence of actual user sessions during the time span it waits until moving the user's files from the desktop into a subfolder. The result was that my mum, who often does not log in for a month and more, called me everytime she did log in, saying "I don't know what happened. All the files I created last time are gone." That is, until I visited and disabled it of course.

      The fact that this hopelessly thoughtless implementation did not help users to be more organized is no proof that users are hopeless.
  • A quick look? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ledow (319597) * on Monday September 18, 2006 @10:04AM (#16130159) Homepage
    A quick look is somewhat understating the review - not a single screenshot and 8 paragraphs of next-to-nothing except what "will" or "should" be in Plasma.

    Useful content: 1%

    Like the "Buy a Link Now" on the article itself... I think someone just bought themselves a link from Slashdot.
    • Re:A quick look? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by LWATCDR (28044) on Monday September 18, 2006 @11:00AM (#16130665) Homepage Journal
      I do have to wonder what that review was? Wouldn't preview be a better term. I mean to review something it has to exist, which KDE 4 doesn't yet.
      I can honestly say I like BOTH gnome and KDE. I prefer to work in gnome but KDE is prettier and frankly more fun.
      With KDE I created a totally useless script that pulls down a few images from some websites using wget. I then set the KDE desktop to use a slide show background. So now have a wall paper that rotates through two hi resolution webcam shots of a local beach and the weather radar.
      Like I said fun but useless. To get Gnome to do the same I am thinking of writing a desklet.
    • by Ed Avis (5917)
      8 paragraphs of next-to-nothing except what "will" or "should" be in Plasma.
      Can you spell 'vapourware'?

      Er, wait - nobody answer that...
    • The whole concept of plasma is still in the design phase. I was pretty amazed someone managed to get a review of something that hasn't got a GUI yet. The 'plasma' folder in KDE SVN consists of data-handling classes only. I'd rather trust the lead developer (Aaron Seigo, aseigo.blogspot) to provide the first sneak preview of plasma rather then MadPenguin.
  • by rayde (738949) on Monday September 18, 2006 @10:12AM (#16130229) Homepage
    (i am not trolling here, this is just my observation) i think most linux fans fall into one of two camps. Those who want Gnome and KDE to stop doing parallel efforts and instead concentrate on a unified GUI for linux... and then those who appreciate having more choices and want KDE and Gnome to push each other.

    I fall into the former. I think it's a pain when you see some cool feature or eyecandy or whatever appearing in the desktop environment you aren't using... but it isn't enough to make you totally switch your current desktop. And just when you do go and switch, your old environment will come out with some sweet feature and you're back to square one.

    i realize it's a complicated issue, and neither KDE nor Gnome is about to fold and allow the other to take precidence... but I still look forward to the day when everyone is working towards a common goal, and when a new user interface element is implemented, everybody can benefit from it.

    • by Eideewt (603267)
      Don't forget the camp that considers them both bloated and forgoes them for something else. The Ratpoison/wmii/dwm/Ion/TWM/PekWM/*box using crowd.
      • by cp.tar (871488)

        All in all, it's a good thing we have a choice.

        A single, unified desktop environment would be great for making Linux more accessible to new users. Which is all fine and dandy, but given all the conflicting UI philosophies people adopt, merging would only lead to everyone but the newbies rather dissatisfied.

        All in all, I used to be an avid Gnome user, but grew dissatisfied with it. I still use it, though, because KDE is just not there yet, and certain Gnome applets are just way too useful. With Plasma, KDE

    • by orasio (188021)
      I don't think the same way you do.

      Right now, what you are talking about is actually happening.
      UI stuff is not a matter of implementation, but one of design. When the KDE project does something nice, and it happens to work in practice, it's much easier for the Gnome team to add it to Gnome.

      But there is a difference between Gnome users, and KDE users.

      I see KDE target as people who want the latest features, and the most configurability.

      Gnome seems to be about having good features, even if they take a lot of ti
    • by lawpoop (604919) on Monday September 18, 2006 @10:35AM (#16130424) Homepage Journal
      I used to think that 'duplication' was just a waste of effort. Wouldn't it be better if we all put our effort together in harmony and came up with the Next Big Thing? United we stand, divided we fall?

      The problem is, when your working on a huge monolithic project like that, people really don't work together. There are arguments and disagreements. Energetical people with radical, new ideas will encounter old farts who want to do things the old way, become disenfranchised and give up. Productive old workhorses will be frustrated by young upstarts trying to pull them in 100 different directions at once, selling a bad idea from 10 years ago as the latest, greatest idea. The project will proceed on the lowest common denominator, implementing vanilla ideas that are promoted simply because nobody could find a reason to reject them.

      Would you like it if Apple and MS got together to make a unified desktop? Don't you think that the bureaucracy and organizational overhead would stymie the project and ultimately water down the end result?

      Instead of waste and duplication, think of it as parallel development teams, developing, implementing, and polishing the latest new ideas as a presentation to the larger mindshare market. Those ideas might need to re-developed or re-implemented, or they may be ready to be included in larger projects, like KDE or Gnome. It's a very effective and efficient way to harness human motivation and inspiration and deliver new ideas to the masses.
      • by Yvan256 (722131)
        Except that in the eyes of many (me included) it totals up to four different operating systems:
        - OS X
        - Windows
        - Linux/KDE
        - Linux/Gnome

        BSD? Nah, it's dead. ;-)
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by kfg (145172) *
      Those who want Gnome and KDE to stop doing parallel efforts and instead concentrate on a unified GUI for linux...

      And all you'd have to do is get the other few dozen GUI projects on board as well. In the meantime you can work on unifying Apple and Microsoft, a much easier task.

      KFG
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by alexgieg (948359)
      What I really want to know is why, oh, WHY, both Gnome and KDE waste so much usefull screen space.

      I'm serious. Now and then I install one or the other in a VM in my XP box, set to the same resolution as XP itself, and watch the state of the default menus, menu items distance, drop-downs, font sizes etc. For some reason I can't grasp, they're always bigger and more wastefull than what Microsoft made with XP. And as a result, I always feel my CRT had just lost one or two inches.

      I wonder whether you all who us
      • by Ash-Fox (726320)
        Now and then I install one or the other in a VM in my XP box, set to the same resolution as XP itself, and watch the state of the default menus, menu items distance, drop-downs, font sizes etc. For some reason I can't grasp, they're always bigger and more wastefull than what Microsoft made with XP.
        I've never seen anyone stick with the defaults in Gnome or KDE. If the person using the computer is computer illiterate, I imagine the big menus and such are generally good.
    • I think it's a pain when you see some cool feature or eyecandy or whatever appearing in the desktop environment you aren't using... but it isn't enough to make you totally switch your current desktop. And just when you do go and switch, your old environment will come out with some sweet feature and you're back to square one.

      I agree with other posters in that competition is a good thing in this sort of environment. Ideally it'd be made easy to transfer your data and applications from one environment to t

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Quasar Sera (838279)

      I think it's a pain when you see some cool feature or eyecandy or whatever appearing in the desktop environment you aren't using... but it isn't enough to make you totally switch your current desktop. And just when you do go and switch, your old environment will come out with some sweet feature and you're back to square one.

      Let's say for argument's sake that Gnome and KDE are the only GUI choices for Linux and that they are (magically) totally merged tomorrow. Of course, by definition, the problem you o

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by ElleyKitten (715519)

      Those who want Gnome and KDE to stop doing parallel efforts and instead concentrate on a unified GUI for linux... and then those who appreciate having more choices and want KDE and Gnome to push each other.

      I'm in the latter. Competition is good for almost everything. Without the competition, why would they bother to innovate (think about IE6)? Also, being separate, KDE and GNOME (and XFCE, and Fluxbox, and...) will innovate in different directions, so you have options and are not herded into what "most

  • Redundant (Score:2, Funny)

    by Spad (470073)
    The K Desktop Environment Environment, you say?
  • The article (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 18, 2006 @10:14AM (#16130240)
    Poor poor CMS, the "article" is just some text, full c&p below:

    It has hardly been a few weeks since the release of KDE v3.5.4, one of the most popular desktop environments for Unix/Linux/FreeBSD operating systems, and the KDE development team is already hard at work. They have a dream of revolutionizing the concept of desktop by providing an array of innovative features aimed at improving both the looks of the desktop environment as well as the productivity of end users. In this article, we will look at one such component called Plasma that promises to change the look and feel of a conventional desktop.

    Plasma is an ambitious project being pursued by the KDE 4 team which aims at providing a workflow sensitive design of the user interface that improves productivity of an average KDE user. The focus is on improving the clarity and reducing the clutter present in today's desktops. The plasma development will bring together key contributors, such as the visual artists, usability experts, technology experts, programmers and enthusiasts at a very early stage during the development process. This will enable them to create a new desktop environment that meets the requirements of novice and experts alike.

    One of the immediate goals of plasma is to provide a better looking desktop. The team is cashing in on the improved graphic capabilities of X server (namely COMPOSITE) and Trolltech's Qt application programming interfaces (APIs) to mesmerize you with those stunning looks. Although a great looking desktop will be a welcome step, the KDE team is not assuming that everyone will have the latest version of X server installed. Thus, care is being taken not to make such looks integral to the functioning of the system. Plasma is being designed in such a way that even people with older versions of X server will be able to effectively use their desktops without the unnecessary frills.

    Plasma will be divided into four distinct components. They are:

    - Desktop: In plasma, the role of the desktop will be much more than a place where one keeps beautiful looking icons and immediately required files. In fact, it will be a place for the user and the computer to interact with each other. The desktop will no more be a static entity with a fixed set of icons. Your desktop will be capable of providing different kinds of items and services as and when you need them.

    - Applet: Applets are small programs, such as clocks, weather notification and application launchers (to name a few) that will help you better manage your work. The aim of the plasma team is to make them easy to develop as well as easy to distribute. They can be authored in a plethora of languages including C/C++, Java, Python and Ruby. The team is currently in the process of developing the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) that will expose the functionality of libplasma library. After developing the applets, they have to be packaged together with all the artwork, HTML and other resource files into a single archive file. This archive file can then easily be distributed over the Internet.

    - Panels: Panels are basically containers for other plasma element. They will be responsible for providing a way to connect applets together.

    - Extenders: Extender is a standard graphic element that provides a plasma element to temporarily grow in size (through some sort of animation) and reveal a larger usable space whenever one clicks or hovers over them. This helps to group related widgets that need not be visible all the time and take up important desktop space. Instead, whenever the user invokes them by means of clicking or hovering, the extender provides a mechanism to reveal the extra information.

    The KDE 4 desktop aims at revolutionizing the concept of a desktop by providing not only an eye-candy look but also a workflow sensitive design. With full support for newer frameworks such as KHotNewStuffs , it will become extremely easy for applications based on KDE to search and download new plugins, extensions and updates from the Internet. According to Zack Rusin, a prominent KDE developer, "Plasma will blow you away. Nothing you've ever seen or will see in the coming years will come even close to what you'll experience with Plasma. And that's a promise." We agree.
  • by TheWoozle (984500) on Monday September 18, 2006 @10:28AM (#16130378)
    The average user can't figure out how to organize their *own* desktop to accomodate their workflow better than "this pile of icons is for this, that pile of icons is for that", and these guys are going to come along and have the *computer* decide what's best?

    Sheesh, have we learned nothing from Microsoft? Having the computer decide what things a user can interact with and how the user can interact with them based on a set of hidden, unchangeable rules is counter-productive at best; at times, it can be murderous-rage inducing.

    How about we actually help people become better-organized by, oh, I don't know...teaching them some useful organizational skills?!
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by paulpach (798828)

      If you have to teach people something, you have already failed. Users Don't Read the Manual. [joelonsoftware.com] So if your interface expects them to do so, your interface is probably flawed.

      They are not trying to guess what the users might do, they are doing some serious research on it [betterdesktop.org]. As a result, they have come up with some great improvements such as kickoff [kde.org]. And their new HIG [openusability.org]

      It is not about the computer deciding what is best, quite the opposite, on usability you are supposed to empower the user [openusability.org]. The link is from

    • by Sentry21 (8183)

      How about we actually help people become better-organized by, oh, I don't know...teaching them some useful organizational skills?!

      Having recently taken a job where I'm forced (yes, forced; I'd rather not) to use Linux on my workstation, and having tried various desktop environments, window managers, etc., I don't think this is the problem.

      Rather than 'teaching [me] some useful organisational skills', how about designing a desktop environment that just gets the heck out of my way and lets me do my work? The

  • by MasterC (70492) <cmlburnett@gm[ ].com ['ail' in gap]> on Monday September 18, 2006 @10:29AM (#16130383) Homepage
    You know, I had a thoughtful and insightful list of maybe half-a-dozen things/comments about KDE I would want as a power user. Then KWin seg faulted on me and I had to restart X thus losing my comments.

    My list now consists of one things:
    • Fix KWin from seg faulting

    That would be super!
  • by rueger (210566) on Monday September 18, 2006 @10:34AM (#16130417) Homepage
    ... which aims at providing a workflow-sensitive design of the user interface that improves productivity of an average KDE user

    My experience with both Windows and OS X is that anytime the OS tries to "help" me it makes life more difficult.

    For me the holy grail of desktop design is one that allows me to place what I want, where I want on the desk top and have it remain exactly where I put it.

    Even better, when I switch from the 12" laptop to the big flat screen on my desk, allow me two desktop settings that make best use of the different real estate available.

    OS X widgets seem like great idea, but I find that the need to pop up or drop into the widget level, and then wait for the actual widgets to load up and begin functioning is a pain in the butt. I'd rather have things like calculators or weather or currency converters right on the desktop and immediately available.

    Apple's solution just seems to add more clicks and more time to do routine tasks.

    If KDE goes the route of trying to guess what I want, please give me the option of turning that guessing game off.
    • For me the holy grail of desktop design is one that allows me to place what I want, where I want on the desk top and have it remain exactly where I put it.

      Amen to that. I can't figure out why XP on my work laptop is always rearranging my desktop. I've got about 20 different icons on my desktop, is it too much to ask that they don't move around at random times? From what I can tell it looks like when the icons move they are going back to some previous configuration, but I'm not positive. Either way, it's a p
      • by PitaBred (632671)
        You're not the only one that gets that. Part of it is because I use an external monitor about half the time with my laptop, in conjunction with the laptop screen, and the rest of the time I don't.
    • OS X widgets seem like great idea, but I find that the need to pop up or drop into the widget level, and then wait for the actual widgets to load up and begin functioning is a pain in the butt. I'd rather have things like calculators or weather or currency converters right on the desktop and immediately available.

      Just for the record, this is already possible in OS X. You just need to enable "developer" mode with an app like Tinkertool (or using the 'defaults' command). You can then place as many on the desk
  • I think I'm going off KDE.

    It's nice on a fast machine, but tediously slow on anything under 2GHz. I do like Window Maker [windowmaker.info]. It's a bit different than you probably were expecting, but I think it's a bit truer to what X used to be like before everyone started trying to turn it into Windows.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      Don't give up yet! KDE4 is actually going to be less ressource-intensive than 3, due to major cleanups and enhancements in both Qt4 and the core KDE4 libraries.
    • I use Fluxbox... It works well on minimal hardware (runs on a 233MhZ Intel MMX). I always customize it, but for the most part, copying the ~/.fluxbox directory is all that's needed. Versus KDE or Gnome which can take up to twenty or thirty seconds, the window manager is ready for use in about two seconds after I press [ENTER] in the xdm/gdm/kdm login screen.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by bhalo05 (865352)
      In my experience, with enough RAM anything over 1Ghz is more than enough to run KDE comfortably. And now, we even know KDE's memory requirements are not so high as many claimed them to be:

      http://ktown.kde.org/~seli/memory/ [kde.org]
  • anyone know if it runs on linux?
  • OS covers.... (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Nichole_knc (790047)
    Not to start a debate but as it is my understanding KDE has been for a more "eye-candy" look and Gnome for a more "clean-minimalist" look. I am one of those minimalist types when it comes to the GUI-OS interface. I used Gnome for years on BSD then in Slackware. When Pat dropped Gnome (understand the build issues) I started using KDE with much fuss due to the "clutter". I have hense learned the finer points of advance customization of KDE in much the same way as I had Gnome. And that is my point.. When the K
  • Vaporware (Score:2, Interesting)

    by protomala (551662)
    Plasma is the biggest vaporware open-source has ever producted. For now, it's just a vague idea, they didn't even created some conceitual images to guide from when star programming.

    Don't take me wrong, I belive plasma will be great, I want to some presentations from Aaron Seigo and liked what he said... but I DOUBT it will launch with KDE4. Probally the interface will still (mostly) be the one used on KDE3. You know, we should learn from Microsoft mistakes, they ditched a lot of things (WinFS, most of inte

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by bhalo05 (865352)
      "Plasma is the biggest vaporware open-source has ever producted"

      Really... obviously you don't remember the times when things like Bonobo or Orbit were supposed to revolutionize the free desktop. Then came KDE2 along with Kparts and DCOP technologies, making true what others had only hyped. I don't expect it will be different this time, since the KDE project has a tradition of delivering what was promised. The only thing I fear it will not be in KDE4 will be Tenor, since Scott Wheeler has already stated he d

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