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Advertising Comes to DVR Owners 294

Posted by Zonk
from the you-will-enjoy-the-signal dept.
bill_kress writes "According to Reuters, television studios are finally trying to target DVR viewers with advertising. The effort, however, seems rather backwards — They are extending the same exact image across the entire 30 second commercial so that TIVO Viewers will be forced to view at least one frame. Wouldn't it be better to add value to the viewing experience instead?" From the article: "The advert for its new drama 'Brotherhood' will show a single image on the screen for the entire 30-second slot, and therefore retain its "sales message" when viewed even at the 12-times speeds enabled by Sky+ and other digital recorders, also known as personal video recorders, or PVRs. Advertisers have been racing to find ways to get messages through as higher numbers of consumers watch TV programs when they want using such recorders, often skipping the commercials."
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Advertising Comes to DVR Owners

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  • Wow (Score:5, Funny)

    by CerebusUS (21051) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:08PM (#16116318)
    Gee, that won't upset the standard viewing public at all... will it?

    Maybe they could play an emergency test tone over the entire 30 seconds, just to get everyone's attention.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by johndierks (784521)
      My Tivo has 60x fast forward... so advertisers will have a 1 in 2 chance of me seeing their single frame! I guess they're the gambling type. In all reality, the bigger problem is the huge ads they're overlaying at the bottom of the shows I'm watching. They're animated and very distracting, which is the point after all. Today, they're for other shows on the network, but I'm sure they'll soon be for other products.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by russ1337 (938915)
        In all reality, the bigger problem is the huge ads they're overlaying at the bottom of the shows I'm watching
        I hate those things... I call them pop-ups. The remind me of the old Kazza that was loaded with gozilla ad-ware or some crap. They really piss me off. I take no notice of what they are, or I end up associating being pissed off with what the ad is for.

        No adaware or spybotS&D is going to scrub those things. There is no escaping them. What do we do?
        • by Firehed (942385)
          Don't watch. Or, better yet, torrent it so you still get to watch, but without the normal adverts and they think their numbers are dropping (and hopefully come to the conclusion that it's those damned ads driving people off, not the shitty programming).
        • Re:Wow (Score:5, Insightful)

          by AxelBoldt (1490) on Friday September 15, 2006 @05:12PM (#16116844) Homepage
          There is no escaping them. What do we do?
          Get yourself a library card and kill your TV.
          • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

            by nacturation (646836)
            Get yourself a library card and kill your TV.

            No, no... the answer is obvious: apply directly to the forehead.

            (I also recommend tagging this story with applydirectlytotheforehead.)
             
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by sobachatina (635055)
          What do we do?

          Hmmm. Go read a book?

          I think it is amusing that people seem to think that they have to watch TV for some reason. Movies, popular music, and TV are so ingrained in our culture that it doesn't seem to occur to people that you can in fact entertain yourself without them.

          Learn to play an instrument- that will keep you happily entertained for the rest of your life.

          I understand that this doesn't answer your rhetorical question. I wanted to rant and this seemed like a good place to do it.

        • I hate those stupid pop-ups on the bottom of the screen. Ever see the ones that make noise, usually some awful blatting, whooshing sound? Makes me want to track down the ad executive responsible, cuff him to a chair, superglue his eyelids open and make him watch his own crap advertising over and over again until he goes completely insane.

          On topic, what about those of us who use the skip forward button? I with skip, you still have a chance of catching a frame of an ad or two, but really, who pays attention t
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Digicrat (973598)
        I always fastforward through the commercials on my DVR, but the speed is such that I normally see at least a couple of frames of each commercial - and I actually like it that way.

        Every now and then I might see the flash of a commercial that might look intersting and will actually go back to watch it - albeit not often. If they actually made more commercials that were (a) interesting, (b) actually relevant to something, (c) not repeated a zillion times, or (d) didn't include dozens of 'enhancement' and diet
      • Re:Wow (Score:5, Informative)

        by HTH NE1 (675604) on Friday September 15, 2006 @05:59PM (#16117222)
        My Tivo has 60x fast forward... so advertisers will have a 1 in 2 chance of me seeing their single frame!

        Only if TiVo showed 60x fast-forward updating at only 1 frame per second would that be true. In fact, at 60x speed, out of a 30-second commercial TiVo shows you 15 frames of it in half a second.

        To see only one frame of a 30-second commercial without still-storing the frame longer than the standard 1/30th of a second, you'd need 900x speed.
    • by plumby (179557)
      They aren't far off that now. I regularly find shows that turn the volume up so loud during commercials that I'm pretty much forced to either fast forward through them or turn the sound off. I'm puzzled as to exactly what they think they are achieving.
    • by ajs (35943)
      Typical for Slashdot. The first people to post take what's in the blurb and run with it, as if it encompasses the full spectrum of the planned concept.

      Think about it. You work for an ad company, and you know that people using TiVos and other DVRs are skipping commercials. What would you do to get your message to them?

      Would you up the expense of the ads to capture a wider audience. No, you would probably loose all of your customers doing that.

      Would you move toward product placements? Yep, and notice that pro
  • For people without DVRs.

    Way to encourage them to get up and go do something else, instead of looking at the same non-moving ad for 30 seconds.
  • by wfberg (24378) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:09PM (#16116326)
    The message will be..


    OBEY
  • Good thing Tivos and other DVRs have no way to just skip 30 seconds...
  • Go Go! (Score:5, Funny)

    by RyanFenton (230700) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:10PM (#16116336)
    Tivo: Go go gadget 30 second skip! [bigmarv.net]

    MythTV: Go go gadget commercial detection and skip! [mythtv.org]

    Windows DVRs: Uh... Go go gadget DRM! Aw, crap!

    Ryan Fenton
    • by Zenaku (821866)
      My Windows DVR running Snapstream has no issues with any sort of DRM. However, it does have all the typical problems associated with windows rot.

      It's been a number of years now since I played with MythTV, I should give it another look. Maybe it has reached the maturity level I need.

    • Re:Go Go! (Score:4, Informative)

      by Guppy06 (410832) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:41PM (#16116580)
      "Windows DVRs: Uh... Go go gadget DRM! Aw, crap!"

      Uh... my MCE setup did 30 s skip out of the box. In fact, I've become so used to it that it's become a bit of a problem while watching DVDs (it's the same button as chapter skip).

      FUD much?
      • by jZnat (793348) *
        He was just basing it on pretty much everything Microsoft has ever done or does now, so I don't blame him for assuming that.
  • it would, but ... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by joeyspqr (629639) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:11PM (#16116342)
    "Wouldn't it be better to add value to the viewing experience instead?" only if your primary concern was the viewer instead of advertising fees
  • So... (Score:4, Funny)

    by Mattintosh (758112) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:12PM (#16116345)
    So, how long is it going to take for PVR makers to develop software that reads the AUDIO stream and returns you to your regularly scheduled programming when the waveform peaks go from clipped to normal? I don't want to jump 30 seconds forward. I want to skip the commercials.
    • by Chang (2714) *
      Don't hold your breath waiting for a commercial PVR vendor to get any sort of effective commercial skip.

      Get a mythtv box or some other sort of home built solution that isn't beholden to the status quo.

      My child is pretty rarely exposed to television advertising. For this I'm eternally grateful to the myth dev team.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Phillup (317168)
        My child is pretty rarely exposed to television advertising.

        Mine actually scream for me to come and ff when commercials come on.

        (The little one cries until the show comes back on!)

        I actually built a mythbox specifically so I could record the kid's shows and edit out all the crap... now I can set them down and let them watch without the commercials.

        I've got one of these [airlinktek.com] that I stuff full of kid shows (and stuff for mom & dad too) for when we go traveling. Very nice to be in a hotel room and not be at the
        • Re:For G (Score:4, Insightful)

          by PitaBred (632671) <slashdotNO@SPAMpitabred.dyndns.org> on Friday September 15, 2006 @05:53PM (#16117186) Homepage
          If it takes moving pictures of a certain type to keep your kid happy, it's time to get them outside more and away from the babysitting box.
          • Re:For G (Score:4, Informative)

            by Phillup (317168) on Friday September 15, 2006 @07:15PM (#16117671)
            Actually, they are smart enough to know they are watching a specific show... and that they aren't sitting there to have shit^H^H commercials stuffed into their head.

            And, you can't always send the kids outside either.

            There is only one of me... mom works too... and someone has to cook dinner.

            I can't cook dinner and watch the kids at the same time.

            And neither can you.

            So, yeah. Sometimes they get to watch the tube. If you don't like it... tough.

            They aren't your kids.
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by bill_kress (99356)
            And what happened to reading. Kids who read on their own before preschool end up with significantly better vocabularies and tend to be much more articulate--they also have a lot less trouble with schoolwork.

            It requires a lot of work on the parents' part to read to the kid every night from the time they are a baby to get them to take to it, but if that's what it takes to have a smart kid, isn't it worth it?
      • No need to hold your breath -- it's been done already by a commercial DVR vendor, and the end result is still very much available. Just check out eBay for any 5000-series ReplayTV unit (not 5500-series, which dropped the auto-skip feature).
    • by kinglink (195330)
      And then you already have that idea, except they'll play talk over the scene then, and at the same time you'll miss parts of your show because of the skip.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by DDLKermit007 (911046)
      They allready do, but they look at far more than just audio. Models no longer in production that Replay made did exactly that. They got sued and stopped using that, but there are allot out there still if you want them. I use a Replay with comskip functions and it works roughly 80-90% of the time and still has a 30 second skip button. Only problem really is with autocomskip functions is every once in a while you get a show that a part gets mistaked for a comercial, but it's not something you can't deal with.
  • by gameboyhippo (827141) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:12PM (#16116352) Journal
    I say "Bring it on!" If all advertisers did this, then it will be easier for my DVR to detect comercials so I don't have to see them at all!
  • When will it stop? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Whammy666 (589169) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:12PM (#16116353) Homepage
    You just have to wonder just how dense the network executives really are. I wonder when it will finally sink in that saturating your programming with advertising to the point that the viewing audience revolts is ultimately counter-productive. They should take it as a clue that if viewers are willing to spend several hundred dollars to avoid ads using specialized hardware, there is something seriously wrong with your marketing plan.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by EllynGeek (824747)
      I do wonder. How do such dim, unimaginative people hold jobs? You'd think even a TV exec could figure out that

      1. When you've seen a commercial 100 times, you're probably tired of it
      2. Even more so if it's a product you have no interest in
      3. Which is probably 95% of all ads- I don't know the real numbers, but you can look at any random ad and figure out pretty easily that the product will appeal to a small fraction of viewers
      4. Even for products you're interested in, you're not going to watch every single da
    • Whats really amazing if I've read some study in which they ponder. Why do people watch Internet Video ads (the ones that come before clips) 90% of the time and even can be tested on them later and remember them. When they don't remember TV ads harly at all.

      DUH its because the commerical spot is less than 30 seconds and only 1 ad. Cram 7 commericals into a break and they all blend together in my mind.
      • by Phillup (317168)
        Cram 7 commericals into a break and they all blend together in my mind.

        Not mine. I didn't see them to begin with!

        Long before I even started taping shows (remember VHS?) I would not sit and watch commercials.

        Simply because there were so many that I could get other stuff done during the "break"... I'd wash dishes, vacuum, do laundry... whatever.

        Invariably I'd miss the beginning of the next portion... and decided to simply tape the shows instead.

        The rest is history...
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by PRMan (959735)

        &gt&gt&gtWhy do people watch Internet Video ads (the ones that come before clips)?

        I don't. I spend the whole 20 seconds trying to figure out how to skip it (and often succeeding).

    • by udderly (890305)
      You just have to wonder just how dense the network executives really are.

      How else can the non-subscription networks get paid? I'm not refuting what you're saying, but what is the business model that's going to pay to produce programming?

      I never watch commercials unless I happen to be watching live commercial-driven TV, which isn't often. I always Tivo the few shows that I watch that aren't on HBO (The Wire is the best program on TV) and zip through the advertisements. If I'm watching a football ga
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Whammy666 (589169)
        The networks were able to make profits 10+ years ago when a 60 minute show typically had only 10 minutes of commercials. Now it's 22 minutes of ads in a 60 minute show. I'm sorry, but that's just plain greed talking. Nobody is denying that a non-subscription network needs ad revenue to survive, but there is such a thing as going too far.

        Subscription TV has now become worse than network TV in terms of ad saturation. The end result is that I watch very little TV at all anymore. There are so many ads that m
  • Ads Targeting TiVo (Score:5, Interesting)

    by lpoulsen (148228) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:13PM (#16116357) Homepage
    GE did something infinetely more intelligent a few months ago.
    The last second of their ad was a set of single frames with interesting information. To see what was there, you had to repeatedly watch the ad until you managed to hit pause at just the right time so you could single-step through the hidden content.

    That way, (at least some) TiVo owners ended up spending 15 minutes on a 30-second ad. Now THAT's creative!!
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by russ1337 (938915)

      The last second of their ad was a set of single frames with interesting information. To see what was there, you had to repeatedly watch the ad until you managed to hit pause at just the right time so you could single-step through the hidden content.

      You are right.. that is amaizing. This is the exact type of thing I like to see - innovation! Not the 'cry cry cry, they are fast forwarding our ads, we need a new law' BS! Word up to GE. I'd like to see this example used AGAINST those trying to put through mor

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Arielholic (196983)
      "The last second of their ad was a set of single frames with interesting information."

      Then why not extend that and fill the whole 30 seconds with interesting information?
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by garcia (6573)
      I was far more intrigued with the simplicity of the HeadOn [youtube.com] commercial (no, the YouTube segment is not skipping -- the commercial is really like that).

      I have absolutely no idea what HeadOn is for or why they are advertising it but it was enough to make sure we stopped the Tivo to watch it. Then we watched it again and again to make sure that we were laughing for good reason ;)
      • by KingVance (815011)
        i would rather have a headache than buy that product based solely on the annoyance and obnoxious factor of the commercial. I do not buy gap clothing for the same reason. Annoying me is the quickest way to get me to not purchase your product.
      • by Otto (17870)
        What's really funny about HeadOn is that it doesn't actually work, at all. It contains no actual medicine of any kind, or not enough to actually matter. It's homeopathic nonsense, meaning that lower dosages of actual working ingredients are considered better, somehow.

        So yes, that's right, they're selling wax in a tube to rub on your forehead to relieve your headaches.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by gEvil (beta) (945888)
        I'm confused. What exactly am I supposed to do with it?
        • by jZnat (793348) *
          Better question: what the fuck does it do? I learnt in broadcasting that ads need to tell you what the hell it's for else it fails.
    • by Phillup (317168)
      That way, (at least some) TiVo owners ended up spending 15 minutes on a 30-second ad.

      Maybe companies need to insist that advertisers sell them ten 3 second slots and insist that the ad run with no more than 30 seconds of commercial time total... potentially 10 ads... but "wasting" no more than 30 seconds of the viewers time.

      Let the people that want to watch the ad slow-mo the thing... and don't infuriate every one else.
  • by AndyG314 (760442) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:13PM (#16116361) Homepage
    If I see a good, or interesting looking add I will stop to watch it. A great example of this is the add with Abe Lincon and a monkey playing jump rope. You can't just wizz by Abe Lincon and a monkey playing jump rope, you have to see what it's all about. Turnes out the add was for sleeping pills.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Kesch (943326)
      You can't just wizz by Abe Lincon and a monkey playing jump rope, you have to see what it's all about.


      This would make a good .sig
    • by rcastro0 (241450)
      > I see a good, or interesting looking add I will stop to watch it.

      Good point. I guess this will mean that advertisers may invest to
      make many different 30s commercials instead of repeating the same
      every break, therefore changing the allocation of ad expenditures
      between film production and media cost.

      Could one build a series of 30s commercials in such a way that watching
      one will increase the likelihood of you watching the next ? Could advertisers
      possibly make you rewind your PVR recording looking for ot
  • Same old, Same old (Score:4, Insightful)

    by suprcvic (684521) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:14PM (#16116365)
    Isn't this how it always is though? When Cable TV first arrived it was touted as having no commercials and then they came. We used to have the luxury of not watching commercials at the movie theatre because we paid to be there, now we have to watch the same trailer for the same bad tv show over and over again while we wait for the movie to start. The "no commercials" idea is IMHO a bait and switch maneuver that for some reason always works on consumers. The ridiculous number of commercials is the main reason I don't watch tv anymore. There are some shows I might like to see, but I'm not willing to sit through all the commercials to see them. Of course, it doesn't help that most of the shows are bad shows with excessively overpaid actors which brings us back to the insane amount of commercials, they have to pay for the talent, or lack thereof.
    • by mikael (484)
      Over here in the UK, the Sunday newspapers regularly (if not every week) put in a free movie DVD with the papers (everything from Clockwise to Highlander, and first episodes of series). Along with these, there will also be movie trailers (accessible through a menu).

      It's interesting that a movie trailer with a newspaper is seen as a bonus, while having to sit through a movie trailer while waiting to
      watch a movie is seen as an inconvenience.
    • by Zenaku (821866)
      I still use my home-built PVR for recording a few shows off of tv, and I always skip the commercials as best I am able. But if you really want to get rid of them, the route to go with is Netflix (or blockbuster, or any of the other clones). Most of the "TV" I now watch comes on DVD. With all the commercials totally stripped out, I can watch TWO "hour-long" episodes in 75 minutes, always see the episodes in order, and never have to wait for the second part of a cliff-hanger.

      It's gotten to the point where

      • by Phillup (317168)
        Most of the "TV" I now watch comes on DVD.

        Exactly!

        I just deleted every "Commander in Chief" and "Invasion" from my Myth box this morning. I haven't watched any of them yet... and they are now on netflix.

        When I do get around to those shows... they will be commercial free and of much higher quality than what I had from the tube.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by michrech (468134)
      Isn't this how it always is though? When Cable TV first arrived it was touted as having no commercials and then they came. We used to have the luxury of not watching commercials at the movie theatre because we paid to be there, now we have to watch the same trailer for the same bad tv show over and over again while we wait for the movie to start. The "no commercials" idea is IMHO a bait and switch maneuver that for some reason always works on consumers. The ridiculous number of commercials is the main reaso
  • Are the guys who think of these things that lame that this is the best they can do? Oooo, we'll force viewers to see the message. Bah, I'll just keep myself full of beer so that I don't understand the visual even if I see it. Let them suck on that!
  • Good. (Score:3, Insightful)

    by JustNiz (692889) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:14PM (#16116374)
    It sounds like the perfect signal for PVR software to watch for in order to skip commercials automatically.
  • by lexsco (594799) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:15PM (#16116391)
    .....PVR's that skip 31 Seconds.
  • Insanity (Score:2, Insightful)

    by TheWoozle (984500)
    One definition of insanity is repeating the same behavior expecting a different outcome. It looks like advertising companies are functionally insane. Advertising on television is dead; people have moved on. (Hell, I don't even watch or pay for TV anymore).

    Time to find a new way to get paid to annoy millions of people.
    • by Grishnakh (216268)
      Advertising on television is dead; people have moved on. (Hell, I don't even watch or pay for TV anymore).

      I do, in a way: my wife and I now wait for shows (like Lost) to come out on DVD, and then we put them in our Netflix queue. It costs money in a way, with the Netflix monthly fee, but the time spent watching Lost would have been spent watching some other movie instead, and with shows on DVDs, there's no commercials to worry about.
  • by russ1337 (938915) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:16PM (#16116397)
    They are extending the same exact image across the entire 30 second commercial so that TIVO Viewers will be forced to view at least one frame.
    Fortunately, this does not work against Mythtv - you can skip the entire ad's with one press: -All you see is the start of the show after the ads! The ad detection algorithm just got an overhaul with Googles-Summer-of-Code (they wrote another version), but i've always found the current one pretty good.

    (I know your all gearing up to whine about how hard mythtv is to install,... then you probably havent tried Knoppmyth [mysettopbox.tv], or the Hyams Fantastic How-to [webhop.net] )
    • by BobSutan (467781)
      Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

      Those are exactly what I've been waiting for to build a myth tv of my own.
  • Honestly (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Kesch (943326) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:20PM (#16116430)
    This is just stupid. I consider it a brute force attack at DVR owners, however, I still might miss this commercial thanks to the hidden 30 sec skip feature of the TiVo. (While watching a show: SELECT PLAY SELECT 3 0 SELECT. Your skip 30 min button will now do 30s instead. Repeat whenever an update resets functionality.) While these adds might be reach more DVR owners, they are going to need the most entertaining audio script in the world or they are going to be COMPLETELY boring for average TV viewers.

    There is a far more preferable category of commercials targetted at DVR owners: The ones that make you want to stop for them. Some commercials you merely stop for because they either interest you(car commercials when you are car shopping) are are simply well scripted and entertaining(Some of the recent Mac commercials). Then there was also a novel series of commercials that GE was running which had a series of text heavy images that were shown for only a few frames each near the end of the commercial. The point was to create a humorous Easter Egg for DVR owners who would be inclined to pause and advance frame by frame.
  • Doh! (Score:3, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:22PM (#16116447)
    Just make ads twelve times slower so they are shown with normal speed when fast-forwarding. (-:
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Odiumjunkie (926074)
      What would be better is carefully crafted ads that will have significance at 12x - perhaps even reveal hidden easter eggs only visible by watching them fast, by working out which frames will actually be viewable when watched at that speed. Messages and animations could be inserted that would be un-noticeable at a normal speed, assuming that 12x will skip frames predictably. A variety of steganography, almost. It would encourage DVR users to view them, especially if the easter eggs were clever or funny, rev
      • by Phillup (317168)
        What would be better is carefully crafted ads that will have significance at 12x - perhaps even reveal hidden easter eggs only visible by watching them fast, by working out which frames will actually be viewable when watched at that speed.

        Hm... I feel a patent coming on... let's pollute the process with a little "prior art"...

        ;-)

        You could do the above *if* there was a way to signal to the recorder to start with a *specific* frame when ff so tha you knew precisely which frames would follow. Otherwise, the f
  • Dish Network PVRs skip the 30 seconds. I think they skip 30 foward or they skip 10 seconds back if you miss something. It's a great feature.
  • by captainstupid (247628) <dmv@ua k r o n.edu> on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:25PM (#16116468) Journal
    Stargate sg-1 recently featured an online companion to the current episode that was only visible while the show was actually being aired. This seems like a very simple and effective way to encourage people to watch the show as it airs and not to TiVo it for later viewing.
    • by Phillup (317168)
      Having never felt the need to go online to see what the fuss was about... I have absolutely no idea what I'm missing.

      And, I could not care less.

      Until that content can show up on my TV, easily... I'll simply ignore it's existence. (and when it does show up it better be more than 75 percent of the screen!)

      I watched exactly one of Sci-Fi's "webisodes" (for Eureka) and decided it was not worth the bullshit of firing up a computer that had flash on it and actually having to sit there while their server strained
      • by Compholio (770966)
        If I had been able to actually download the data to watch without all the stuttering... and if I could have seen it on my every day workhorse (linux)... and if it wasn't the size of a postage stamp... maybe I'd reconsider)

        I had the same problem, what was worse was it took so long for the site to load that I wasted a ton of time waiting for a clip that I couldn't even watch. I sent them a feedback email about it but unless they get more complaints they'll probably just ignore the problem.
    • Except many people don't have their computer within TV viewing range. I know mine is around the corner from the TV. So had I been watching this, I would have just listend to the TV show while playing around with the internet site. And maybe rewatching it on the TiVo later.
  • by Minwee (522556) <dcr@neverwhen.org> on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:29PM (#16116495) Homepage

    If you really want people to watch your advertisements, make them _want_ to watch. Make them interesting. People will go out of their way to watch them at least once, and share copies with all of their friends.

    Of course, the down side to this is that you may have to actually pay someone to do the job.


  • Why not just film the ads at 1/3rd the real-time, so when you fast foward 3x, they will appear to go at normal speed?

  • Good thing... (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Phillup (317168) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:51PM (#16116667)
    that I watch my shows months after they are recorded.

    I mean, I'd really hate to be suckered in by an advertisement that was actually relevant!

    But, by watching everything months later I can be sure that any shows being advertised will have been shown long ago... and, like every other frikken commercial... of absolutely no use to me.

    So, until I'm:

    1) geriatric
    2) female
    3) senile
    4) stupid
    5) impotent
    6) over weight
    7) bored
    8) unable to solve my own problems
    9) unable to read

    etc...

    I think I'll just keep skipping commercials. Because, at best... they are a complete waste of my time.
  • by just_another_sean (919159) on Friday September 15, 2006 @04:57PM (#16116722) Homepage Journal
    "designed to combat viewers using digital recorders to avoid commercials."

    It's on biatch!
  • Dear Advertisers,
    Make your adverts suck less, and I'll actually stop my tivo to watch them.

    I don't need Billy Mays yelling at me. I don't need to see the same annoying people trying to sell me medication for stuff I don't have. I don't need to have an annoying jingle stuck in my head.

    Good adverts that are either a) funny, or b) just well done get watched; an example of both is the Napa commercials with the American Chopper guys in it.

    Thanks.
  • by bmajik (96670)
    For a group of people so intent on having their message heard, they are awfully resistant to hearing the message that the TV viewing public is sending back.

    You know. The message that says "get fucked, TV advertisers. Your commercials suck, piss us off, and we're never buying your shit products. The more you make bad commercials and show them every 7 minutes, the more we hate you, and will do anything to avoid you and your products"

    I cancelled TV service completely. It has had a generally positive effect
  • Wow, what a stupid thing for advertisers to do.

    If you want to target the DVR audience, do what the "Daily Show" did - Rob Cordry had a hilarious skit that included a list of all the people he hates. The list zoomed by so fast that only DVR-capable viewers could watch it. The list of people he hates included an email address: listpausers@yahoo.com - so we emailed it, and got this [flickr.com] in reply.

    Totally awesome.

    In May of this year, GE's "ecomagination" campaign had a very clever TV ad [purepvr.com] that included a spoof o

  • Cost (Score:4, Insightful)

    by lymond01 (314120) on Friday September 15, 2006 @05:03PM (#16116773)
    I pay an extra $10 a month to rent the DVR from Comcast. What do I have to do to not watch commercials? How much will it cost? Do I have to buy a 12-pack of Pepsi, 2 pairs of Levis, a Toyota Camry, and a pack of Charmin Toilet Tissue every month before the advertisers will leave me alone?

    I'm paying money to not watch commercials. I'm not downloading pirated films or rogue recordings. What the hell is the deal?
  • OK, so there are about a bzillion things I don't understand in life. So add this one to the list.

    What on Earth is the point of trying to ram an advert down the throat of someone who has already demonstrated that he doesn't want to see it? Surely, surely, surely, the person who is forced to view it is more likely to view your product negatively after this experience than he is to suddenly change his mind and decide that "Gosh! I was wrong after all. I really want to buy the product from this manufacturer

  • I probably posted this somewhere before. But anyway, here goes again.

    What I want is for my PVR to *record* the commercial, and then when I'm watching the program inform me that it has ads that I can watch. When I feel like looking at the ads, it should give me a list of available ads showing me:

    - Sponsor
    - The shows that the sponsor sponsors
    - a gross classification for the ad (gambling, liquor, sex, stuff I don't care about)
    - Ad name

    I should be able to filter the ads so that it automatically removes ads th
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by ColaMan (37550)
      a gross classification for the ad (gambling, liquor, sex, stuff I don't care about)

      Bender, is that you?
  • Talk about an easy way to predict a commercial. Not to mention an easy way to build a database of known commercials. I was worried the complexities of modern telvision advertisements would ward off most spam detection, but with something that accomplishable, this might start off another wave of advert detection in video ;)
  • The first time I heard about an idea like this was from a slashdot comment. Someone wondered - a video of a Visa card getting taken out of a wallet in slo-mo...just enough so it would be "real time" to a fast-forwarding Tivo owner. I though the idea was brilliant, although my Tivo doesn't have a smooth frame rate while it forwards. Maybe someone at an ad agency was reading Slashdot? I looked for the original post but could not find it.

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