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Blue Screen of Death for Mac OS X 349

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the creative-wastes-of-time dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Possibly nothing in the OS world has as much of a bad rap as the infamous BSOD (blue screen of death) in Microsoft Windows. On the other hand Apple hides the ugly kernel panics behind a nice looking GUI which only tells you its time to restart your dead system. Interestingly Mac OS X kernel has a secret API which lets you decide what your kernel panics are going to look like! In this Mac OS X Internals article Amit Singh explains how to use this API. Apparently you can upload custom panic images into the kernel and there's even a way to test these images by causing a fake panic. The article also shows the ultimate joke is to upload an actual BSOD image for authentic Windows looking panics right inside of OS X."
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Blue Screen of Death for Mac OS X

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  • by ackthpt (218170) * on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:09PM (#16085345) Homepage Journal

    It's not like Microsoft invented it, either. I remember these [wikipedia.org] quite unfondly. Before that I had a frozen screen on a C64. And before that I had stopped lights on the PDP-11 display. And before that we had random characters all over the screen of Ohio Scientific (OSI) computers.

    But Microsoft is widely credited with perfecting the BSoD and giving it fame.

    A system crash with a tasteful little box can be as easily dispised as all the the preceding. I suppose, like everything Apple is doing these days, they've given it a certain panache and now everybody will want one.

    • Keep it simple (Score:4, Insightful)

      by EmbeddedJanitor (597831) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:24PM (#16085442)
      If you have an unstable system (BSOD-worthy), then it is probably best to rely on as few system resources as possible. THis includes GUIs etc. That's why a simple text-based BSOD or oops handler is a better idea than something that tries to do a whole bunch of cute graphics etc (which relies on a whole lot more hardware & software to be working properly).
      • by Sqwubbsy (723014) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:57PM (#16085632) Homepage Journal
        THis includes GUIs etc. That's why a simple text-based BSOD or oops handler is a better idea than something that tries to do a whole bunch of cute graphics etc (which relies on a whole lot more hardware & software to be working properly).

        You are so not a Mac owner based on these statements.
      • Keep it simple AND keep it informative. A real BSOD will include information about the stop code and arguments at the time of death. If the system knows which driver caused the crash it will tell you this as well.
        The Mac panic screen not only takes more resources to display but they tell you far less. "Please restart" in 23 different languages is not helpful. The 10.0 and 10.1 version looked much better.

        • Re:Keep it simple (Score:4, Informative)

          by blaster (24183) on Monday September 11, 2006 @09:48PM (#16086073)
          The graphical version takes slightly fewer resources. You have to run a single buffer through an RLE decompression routine directly out into a linear mapped framebuffer. To display text you actually have to use all of the console code. Remember, there is no hardware console, so you have to actually do all the text element positioning in software, and the graphics card is in exactly the same mode either way.

          It does not take appreciably more resources either way, and both code paths are fairly simple and well tested.
        • Re:Keep it simple (Score:5, Interesting)

          by Jahz (831343) on Monday September 11, 2006 @09:56PM (#16086117) Homepage Journal
          Keep it simple AND keep it informative. A real BSOD will include information about the stop code and arguments at the time of death. If the system knows which driver caused the crash it will tell you this as well.
          The Mac panic screen not only takes more resources to display but they tell you far less. "Please restart" in 23 different languages is not helpful. The 10.0 and 10.1 version looked much better.

          Obviously you are NOT ready for the Mac. Come see the light, friend.

          Do you really think that Apple have decided error codes and detailed crash reports are not important?? No, of course they have not. There are two reasons Apple does this.

          1) The truth is that the infamous blue page of kernel farts that windows spews out are only to technicians or sysadmins. The home user, and in fact, the power users, can do nothing with it. Nothing, of course, except Google for the stop code and hope Microsoft has a techhelp article on what it means. You can reply to this and say that

          STOP: 0x0000008E (c0000005, bf875fc3, f07bcd48, 00000000)
          KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED

          makes perfect sense to you... but you'd be lying. I know that the relevent part is 8E but 99% of users NEVER NEED TO SEE THIS and will NEVER USE IT.

          Back to Apple. Apple has a little ditty called the "CrashReporter" and it has an OSX front-end to the system's log filed in /var/log/. The logs contain all the nitty gritty about what was in the registers when the sytem exploded, what driver/module caused it, etc readily and easily recorded in the system log. Said information (like STOP: 0x0000000000000000008E) is for a tech or sysadmin, not a standard user.

          2) What do you do with the BSOD info displayed?? A true nooblar would write it all down. That's a waste of time, becuase its also in Windows' system log. Assuming you're going to Google for it, you would presumably reboot the machine, right? So why did we even need to see the error when it happened? The machine is up not, and the logs are visible...??

          Bottom line: Apple's goal is to keep things simple, clean and friendly. What would your parents rather see?

          1. A pleasant semi-transparent overlay that asks them to reboot their machine (in their native language)
          2. A solid blue screen reading "KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED" followed by 30 rows of random-like numbers

          Which one?

          P.S. - Don't even think about saying "what happens if you cant boot." If that is the case, remove the new hardware. Otherwise you are in DEEP trouble... the code doesnt really matter and you'd actually be better off reading the error from /var/log.
          • by Jahz (831343)
            Sorry in advance for the terrible spelling/grammar in that... I forgot to proof read it :)
            • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

              by Anonymous Coward
              There are 10 types of people in the world. Those who understand binary and those who do not.

              What about the other 8? I think you've got a typo there.

              • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

                by Gnavpot (708731)
                > There are 10 types of people in the world. Those who understand binary and those who do not.

                What about the other 8? I think you've got a typo there.
                There are 11 types of people in the world. Those who can count and those who can't.
          • Re:Keep it simple (Score:4, Insightful)

            by jericho4.0 (565125) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @12:45AM (#16086647)
            Regarding your first point; I'm more than a power user. I can actually figure out what those funny numbers mean. But, I never, ever, do. Who the hell does?
        • by Senjutsu (614542)
          The Mac panic screen not only takes more resources to display but they tell you far less.

          "Take more resources"?? The system has crashed! It's not like it's stealing precious RAM from your WoW instance, it's a single write into the framebuffer on an otherwise idled OS.

          All the geek info about what process blew up where when is available in /var/log, and you'd need to reboot to use that information anyways, so writing it out on screen when the system crashes is useless; the average user can't interpret it,
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by 1u3hr (530656)
        a simple text-based BSOD or oops handler is a better idea than something that tries to do a whole bunch of cute graphics etc (which relies on a whole lot more hardware & software to be working properly).

        From TFA, the crash screen is a single image file, a screenshot. It's probably no harder to load a single screen than a stream of text. And OSX does have an option to display text error messages if you really want to see them.

    • by DingerX (847589) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:26PM (#16085453) Journal
      Guru meditations were awesome, and I fondly remember that flashing red border.

      But Amiga wasn't first. The Mac "Bomb" preceded it, and was notoriously useless for troubleshooting.

      Still, most Windows XP users haven't seen a BSOD ever. Go ahead and ask them. See, Windows XP solved that. But mysteriously, their power supply is unreliable, and "trips" on the slightest whim.

      You gotta love that. "BSOD is bad for marketing, and most people don't know what to do with the information anyway. Let's just reset the computer and pretend it's a power spike."

      I'd advise people to change their default settings, but one time I had "write memory contents to log file on BSOD" enabled when I was moving data about, and hand less free memory on my HD than in RAM.

      Don't ever, ever do that.
    • by MyDixieWrecked (548719) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:59PM (#16085636) Homepage Journal
      A system crash with a tasteful little box can be as easily dispised as all the the preceding.

      that is precisely true.

      My machine at work has some kind of hardware problem that was never quite solved while it was under applecare. it "panics" at least once a day, some days, it'll "panic" 5-10 times. Some things that set it off are scrolling in a terminal window (such as when I'm sync'ing portage on our server) or putting an audio CD in the lower optical drive.

      The last time we brought it to tekserve, they claimed that both scsi drives were bad and they replaced them, and we didn't have a panic for a couple months, but by the time they came back (and with a vengence, I might add), there was no more applecare coverage...

      I quote "panic" because sometimes I get that nice pretty "please restart your computer" screen, sometimes I get the text dump on the desktop, and sometimes the machine locks up, altogether.

      luckily, we're getting one of those nice quad-xeon machines as soon as adobe releases the new creative suite, at which point I'll throw this machine out of a window.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday September 11, 2006 @08:00PM (#16085641)
      It's not like Microsoft invented it, either.

      Microsoft had a single DEBUG line in the registry for Windows 95 -- it allowed the application of your choice to intercept the crash.

      The first commercially successful program to implement it was "Power Utilities 95 with Crashproof" [quickerwit.com] that handled/exposed many hardware conflict sins without just covering them up.

      About 50K copies later and good shelf space at Frys/COMPUSA/BestBuy , Symantec took notice and put out their $29 Crashproofing program that didn't perform dozens of system checks or even unmask the cause of the crash.

      If version 1.0 of that Norton floppy disk consisted of anything more than copying a 1 line registry change and a pointer to a bitmap, then it never showed in practice.

    • by Frequency Domain (601421) on Monday September 11, 2006 @08:31PM (#16085784)
      No, MS didn't invent it. They just perfected it. Remember when there was talk about adding a BSOD hotkey to the MS keyboard, so you wouldn't have to go through the hassle of running software to get it?
    • ... you likely had just saved your program, the switches were probably permanently set to the bootstrap loader address anyway, two (three?) switch flips and you're back in a whopping 20 seconds...
    • As a long time Mac user, I remember (not so) fondly the "System Bomb" graphic (a black spherical bomb with a lit fuse) that Apple used for system crashes prior to OSX. And those system bombs happend all the time, much more than blue screens of Win3x, Win95, or NT. But yes, the "System Bomb" pic was cuter than a blue screen with a bunch of white text, so it was in keeping with Apple's attention to "style" (even for crashes). ;-)

      (And of course, today apple uses the "Spinning beachball of death" for app hangs
      • Yeah, but if you had MacsBug [wikipedia.org] installed, you'd just type ea or es and exit the offending application, never seeing the bomb at all. Without Macs bug, you could push the programmer's switch and type GO Finder, but that was less reliable.

        Heck, I rarely even lost data in those crashes since I'd dump the offending application's data space to a logfile and reconstruct what I could from there.

        Too bad I never could get mouse support for MacsBug working properly. That would've saved much manual retyping of addresses
  • by rodgster (671476) * <rodgster AT yahoo DOT com> on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:09PM (#16085348) Journal
    Sort of unrelated:

    I used to have BSOD as my screen saver for an earlier version of Fedora (IIRC). It was always amusing when people would stop by to chat, a little while later, they'd see my PC suddenly BSOD! The looks I'd see (on other people's faces) makes me laugh just remembering.

    • I had the screen saver on Solaris on my ultra Sparc. I forgot I choose it and it did a Sun BSOD first my heart skipped a beat I was about to type some commands in the prom. then it turned off the saver.
    • by pembo13 (770295)
      Ahh. I remeber that screen saver..circa FC2..good times.
    • Sysinternals made a really nice BSoD screensaver [sysinternals.com] for Windows.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by ac7xc (686042)
      There was actually a number complaints about the BSOD and another about kernel panic screen savers that RedHat removed those from screen savers. If you search the fedora-list archives you should find the original emails complaining about it. ;-)
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Reverend528 (585549)

      I used to use that screensaver too. One time, my old roommate accidentally locked my computer. When BSOD came up, he thought it had crashed.

      That's how I discovered he was looking at porn on my computer.

    • by Tim Browse (9263)

      At one company, I installed the BSOD screen saver on our NT file server because it amused me.

      Of course, less than an hour later I nearly had a heart attack when I looked up from a big code check-in to see our file server had 'blue-screened'.

      I uninstalled it soon afterwards :-)

      Aside: I seem to remember that the NT 'bouncing lines' screen saver used to halve server performance when it kicked in (genius!), so in the end I went for the boring old 'make the screen go blank' screen saver.

    • by mhore (582354)
      I used to have BSOD as my screen saver for an earlier version of Fedora (IIRC). It was always amusing when people would stop by to chat, a little while later, they'd see my PC suddenly BSOD! The looks I'd see (on other people's faces) makes me laugh just remembering.

      I used to have that screensaver going in X. I actually flipped out once because I got the kernel panic (wasn't thinking) and I was in the middle of something rather important and I just went on about "damn damn damn" in true Life of Brian fas

  • Likewise (Score:4, Informative)

    by Umbral Blot (737704) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:10PM (#16085354) Homepage
    Likewise in windows you can change the background color and text color of the BSOD (or at least you could uder 98, I haven't had the desire to play around with it under 2000 / XP since they crash much less frequently).
  • by GungaDan (195739) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:12PM (#16085370) Homepage
    I, for one, welcome our new department-wide goatse.cx kernel panic message.

    Any of you guys hiring?

  • Well on the upside (Score:5, Insightful)

    by OverlordQ (264228) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:12PM (#16085371) Journal
    The Win32 BSOD does give you better information so you can try to diagnose the problem.

    Which is kinda lacking in the OSX Panic screen.
    • by RAMMS+EIN (578166) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:19PM (#16085411) Homepage Journal
      But then MS made the brillant decision to reboot the system right when the BSOD appeared, robbing it of any usefulness. Or perhaps they didn't do it on purpose, but I've seen plenty of displays just go blue for a split second, then blank as the system started rebooting.
      • by RonnyJ (651856)
        Windows 2000 doesn't reboot automatically when a BSOD occurs.

        Windows XP does by default, but can be set not to (Control Panel, System, Advanced, Startup and Recovery).

        A BSOD will also create a memory dump on disk (which can be set to either be a 'minidump', or a complete memory dump).
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by mattgreen (701203)
        It gets logged to the system's event log, which you can check out later.
    • by mybecq (131456) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:48PM (#16085582)
      The Win32 BSOD does give you better information so you can try to diagnose the problem.

      Kind of like knowing that there were:
      - 56 bulbs
      - 24 horizontal grill bars
      - 72 vertical ridges on 1600 sq ft of 1/4" steel
      - 20% full gas tank
      - 209,000 miles driven
      - 3 tread patterns
      - 5 axles
      - 18 wheels

      You still got hit by a truck.
      • by kevmo (243736) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @12:03AM (#16086548)
        I find it very useful for the rare occasions that I get BSODs anymore to at least know what driver caused the problem. If the BSOD lists something like atixxxxx, then I know that my video card screwed up, and so on. Because almost all of my crashes are caused by driver or hardware problems, its helpful knowing just what that problem is so I can fix the driver or replace the hardware (and thus almost never get crashes on that computer in the future).
    • by aarku (151823)
      OS X writes out a proper log file you can look at later... what good is showing it when it's crashed?
    • by diamondsw (685967)
      If you're a developer, you can easily set the boot time arguments to log to the screen. Meanwhile, panic information is logged, so you ca always get at it post-mortem.

      For end users, a bunch of hexadecimal won't mean squat. Telling them to reboot in a non-scary way is a Good Thing.
    • by shawnce (146129) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:55PM (#16085615) Homepage
      Kernel panic information gets logged on reboot to a file and you can capture a kernel core dump if you want.

      Review... TN2063 [apple.com], TN2118 [apple.com], Debugging the Kernel [apple.com], etc.
    • by DigitlDud (443365)
      If you want better information you can open up the crash dump in WinDbg. An "analyze -v" command will give you useful information most of the time.
    • by Yaztromo (655250)

      The Win32 BSOD does give you better information so you can try to diagnose the problem. Which is kinda lacking in the OSX Panic screen.

      The OS X panic details get logged to a file, so you can easily get this information in a nice digital form after you've rebooted (or by setting the system into target disk mode). Which, on the plus side, means you don't have to sit and scribble down a bunch of hex and hope that you got in all correct before typing into your system to e-mail to someone for diagnosis.

      Lik

    • by Lars T. (470328)
      Gee, it's soooo hard. [apple.com]
      Starting with Mac OS X 10.2, a panic is indicated by the multi-lingual alert shown in Figure 1. After restarting the system, a file called panic.log should be present in /Library/Logs . This file contains the same data as the panic dump on the screen.
  • by Malc (1751) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:13PM (#16085377)
    Hardly the ultimate joke. Jokes are supposed to be original. This has been a screen saver under Linux for years.

    Anyway, couldn't this be described as the ultimate joke [youtube.com]?
    • Jokes are supposed to be original.

      You must be new here.

    • A good joke would consist of the following steps:
      1) set an Intel build of MacOS to display the BSoD
      2) instal bootcamp and a copy of XP, but never actually boot into XP
      3) find and install a cheep faulty RAM module that allows MacOS to kernel panic with some degree of frequency.
      4) bring the Mac in for service at an Apple store
      5) claim that MacOS started displaying the BSoD after you installed Windows.
      6) wait for someone to pick up the red phone to Cupertino.

      If you're dealing with an older Mac vet, add an obsc
  • Old Hat (Score:3, Funny)

    by overshoot (39700) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:16PM (#16085390)
    Yawn.

    Once upon a time, I was chairing an out-of-town meeting with a roomful of engineers. We spent most of the morning working a spreadsheet with margin calculations on it trying to come up with a margin budget that everyone could live with; I was running the machine that drove the projector.

    The conversation took a turn away from the spreadsheet, and after a bit the BSOD came up onscreen. The panic in the room was palpable -- everyone figured we'd just lost the whole morning, and quite a few had afternoon flights out.

    So I hit the shift key and entered my password to unlock the screen.

    The classic BSOD screensaver gets the same amusement factor without the hassle of hacking OSX.

    • by Pfhorrest (545131) on Monday September 11, 2006 @08:58PM (#16085894) Homepage Journal
      I know it's off-topic, but I just had to share the image that came to mind when I first read this:

      Once upon a time, I was chairing an out-of-town meeting with a roomful of engineers...

      Picture, if you will, a meeting room filled with terrified engineers, all cowering behind one end of the table and desperately trying to shield their heads from ballistic chairs, being hurled by a Donkey-Kong like Steve Ballmer, who in turn is jumping up and down upon the far end of the table...

      I know the Steve Ballmer jokes are old and off-topic (and I don't mean to compare you to him) but the image of "chairing" a meeting full of engineers was just to hilarious not to share. :-)
  • Back early on there was a bug in OS X which I think slashdot mentioned that caused a BSOD it required moving a directory into itself. Besides that one time I havn't seen the BSOD. after over 4 years of using my powerbook even doing stuff that it shouldn't be doing.
    • My only one was when I brought the machine back from sleep, the thing was that I put the machine to sleep during a OS upgrade... I rebooted, reinstalled the upgrade, and everything worked nicely.
    • I got a kernel panic on OSX 10.1 (some networking problem), but that's the only time. It was white with black text, if I recall correctly, displaying a bunch of unix jargon. :-)
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Monx (742514)
        Here's how you get an instant crash in OS X:
        1. Open the DVD Player application.
        2. Attach a second monitor.
        3. Select Detect Displays from the monitor menu.
        4. Kaboom!

        For extra craptacularity, do this while installing a system update. Then you get to manually install the update in single user mode before your system will be bootable again. When I say manually, I mean manually extracting files from the pax archive and copying them to the appropriate location because systemupdate thinks that everything is OK despite dozens

    • Today no less, at the local Apple store I got a kernal panic "You need to restart your computer" message. All I did was put OmniDazzle [omnigroup.com] on a new Mac Pro.

      What surprised me was that I had only ever seen the kernal panic only once before after using OS X daily over two years... and that was when I was trying to crash it. (Hint: disabling network adapters and enabling others while connected to an SMB share can cause unpredictable results under 10.3)

      While changing the crash message is interesting, it's not some
  • by lostngone (855272) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:23PM (#16085429)
    Leave it to Apple to give you a choice when it comes to Panic screens. Does Vista do this yet?
  • by creimer (824291) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:29PM (#16085480) Homepage
    I know that Mac users are supposed to be more friendly towards Windows users switching over but changing the kernal panic screen to match the BSOD is going too far. If you want it that badly, install Windows on a separate partition.
  • I'd personally go for a nice old fashioned Guru Meditation Error. :) *Digs around his garage for his A500*
  • Hidden? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:32PM (#16085497) Journal
    hides the ugly kernel panics behind a nice looking GUI
    It must hide them really well because in 4 or 5 years I haven't seen one. (I did once about 5 years ago though - that'll teach me to mess with third party USB drivers.)
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Stele (9443)
      Funny - about the same amount of time since I saw one on any of my Windows boxen. YMMV.
      • I'd say the same, but by coincidence my wife got her first XP BSOD this weekend. Apart from that I haven't seen one for years. In fact, Linux, MacOS X and Windows all seem pretty free of kernel panics to me these days and maybe the BSOD jokes need to die...
  • by Moofie (22272) <lee.ringofsaturn@com> on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:36PM (#16085520) Homepage
    That's not NEARLY as cool as the car crash sound Macs used to make when they really, really, REALLY blew up fierce. Get a good pair of speakers, and that sound would scare the tar out of everybody in the area!

    I think it only happened to me once, on a junky old LCIII, while I was just working. There was a key combo to induce it on boot, though, and I got a lot of mileage out of that...
    • by b0s0z0ku (752509)
      That's not NEARLY as cool as the car crash sound Macs used to make when they really, really, REALLY blew up fierce. Get a good pair of speakers, and that sound would scare the tar out of everybody in the area!

      I thought the old ones played "funeral chimes" when they crashed.

      -b.

  • Gray screen of death (Score:3, Informative)

    by azav (469988) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:38PM (#16085531) Homepage Journal
    I have gotten the gray screen of death twice on my Quad.

    When capturing QuickTime video, QuickTime writes one copy of the file and then makes another. If you are capturing to a mastering codec (ie animation) minutes can become gigabytes. It is easy to fill up the internal HD in this case.

    What can easily happen in this case is the file writing routines will start writing over allocated blocks. System files, even track zero. If it writes over track zero, your internal hard drive will be destroyed.

    How do I know this? It happened to me twice.

    The second time, I was left with a 17 GB file on my hard drive that can not be deleted by any means other than reformatting the disk. The first time it happened, the HD was borked so bad that plugging it into another Mac caused that mac to kernel panic. Apple replaced the drive but I lost everything minus my backups.

    As I was told by an Apple tech, when a hd starts up the dirve itself checks the validity of track zero. If it is invalid, you have a hardware fault and this generates a kernel panic.

    This was all validated by Apple techs.

    You have been warned. Hope this helps someone.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by plasmoidia (935911)
      Uhh, am I missing something? Any sensible OS should not allow a program to write to a full disk. Period. It should return from the fwrite (or equivalent) syscall with a failure and the worst that would possibly happen is the program would crash because it did not handle that correctly (well, aside from losing the data that the program was desperately trying to write). If it decides to start randomly overwriting already allocated disk blocks, then that is a very poorly written OS indeed.
    • by blob.DK (477287) on Tuesday September 12, 2006 @02:36AM (#16086930) Homepage
      Excuse me, Sir, but that is a misunderstanding on your part. Mac OS X does not overwrite track zero just because the disk is full.

      What you have experienced is the phenomenom of Mac OS X getting caught up in: "ups, the disk is full - so now I can't save any (system) preferences." Any files written during this will end up as zero-byte files.

      There is no magic "QuickTime will overwrite vital systemfiles, to which only root has access"-routines.
  • by ROMRIX (912502) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:43PM (#16085553) Homepage
    "The article also shows the ultimate joke is to upload an actual BSOD image for authentic Windows looking panics right inside of OS X."

    Ya! and then we could like, (snicker, snicker) we could like, bring up pictures of toilet paper on the monitor (snicker, snicker) and they would think (hehe, snicker) they would think they got T.P.'ed! HAHAHAHA!!!!!111!!!

    Did anyone else just develop a twitch in their left eye?
  • It already has a black screen of death. Favourite for causing it is to plug in certain brands of firewire hard drive (once did it with a USB network card too).

    If the OS itself hasn't failed just the GUI you get the spinning wheel of death..

    Never heard of any kind of option that "hides the ugly kernel panics behind a nice looking GUI".. possibly a 3rd party app he's installed.
    • KP's have been "pretty" since 10.2. Before 10.2, they would spill a bunch of terminal text over the upper left of the GUI. From 10.2 onward, they display a flat, modal dialog with an error message in several languages. In each case, the system would reboot upon the next input from keyboard or mouse.
    • RTFA. He just found the image that's used for the Black Screen of Death and replaced it with a Windows BSOD screenshot.
  • by belmolis (702863)

    Maybe Linux needs to adopt this so as to ease the transition from MS Windows.

  • by CrazyJim1 (809850) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:50PM (#16085590) Journal
    If the aptly named blue screen of death is indeed the ultimate joke, people should die laughing at it.
  • by spywhere (824072) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:55PM (#16085611)
    There were rumors, before XP came out, that they were going to respond to the iMac by making the Blue Screen of Death available in five designer colors.
  • Whatever happened to the Longhorn / Vista 'Red Screen of Death'?
    Red is so much scarier.
    http://blogs.msdn.com/michkap/archive/2005/05/07/4 15335.aspx [msdn.com]
  • by rocjoe71 (545053) on Monday September 11, 2006 @07:59PM (#16085637) Homepage

    You young punks and blue-screens-of-panic blah, blah blah!

    ...In my day, we didn't even HAVE screens, just a blinking light and if that light ever stopped blinking, you knew there was trouble, boy...

  • Redmond... (Score:4, Funny)

    by RAMMS+EIN (578166) on Monday September 11, 2006 @08:02PM (#16085650) Homepage Journal
    Redmond, start your photocopiers!
  • Maybe half a dozen? That's since 2000, when I installed the Beta, and then 10.1. Two causes: when I installed Panther, I got a new USB hub at the same time. Half my kernel panics right then. It was a bad hub that delivered less than its rated power. BAM! Later, when I moved up to the G5, I moved my old OS over from the G4. I used Carbon Copy Cloner, but I screwed up something -- I now use SuperDuper! because it's a real Mac app -- and something got really screwy about root and my admin account. Again, anoth
    • Never had one on Windows XP, and have had exactly one on Windows 2000 with a bad stick of RAM. Stick that in your pipe and smoke it, zealot.
  • by Chacham (981) * on Monday September 11, 2006 @08:48PM (#16085849) Homepage Journal
    BSoD is for the NT (and XP) lines. Win9x is a blue screen, not a BSoD.

    The *reason* it called a BSoD, is because the computer will not do *anything* without a reboot. This is not usually the case under 9x.
  • The article also shows the ultimate joke is to upload an actual BSOD image for authentic Windows looking panics right inside of OS X.

    Ah man, now THAT'S humor. If by humor, you mean stupid.
  • by dark-br (473115) on Monday September 11, 2006 @09:51PM (#16086086) Homepage
    ... Macs Crash Different [youtube.com]

    And don't get me wrong, I'm typing this on a Mac and I would not trade it for anything else out there ;)

  • I got a BSOD while reading these comments, no joke :P

You know that feeling when you're leaning back on a stool and it starts to tip over? Well, that's how I feel all the time. -- Steven Wright

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