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Possible Delays for Vista in Europe 279

Posted by Zonk
from the wow-total-coincidence dept.
tttonyyy writes "After Microsoft was hit with fines for anti-competitive behaviour in 2004 and 2006, it seems that the launch of Vista may be delayed in Europe. Microsoft is blaming this delay on a lack of guidelines from the European Commission. The Commission denies causing any delay, declaring that the impetus is not on them but on Microsoft to produce a product that conforms to the EU competition rules." Further, The New York Times reports "Delaying the introduction in Europe, [members of the European Parliament] said in a letter made public by Microsoft on Thursday, 'would put European companies at a competitive disadvantage with every other company around the world who does have access to these new technologies.'"
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Possible Delays for Vista in Europe

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:22AM (#16066498)
    Lucky bastards!
  • by dretay (583646) <drew@cs[ ]d.edu ['.um' in gap]> on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:22AM (#16066503) Homepage
    without Aero how will we visualize/optimize our corporate paradigms?
    • by ifrag (984323) on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:29AM (#16066551)
      You won't even be able to compete at all! I'd estimate a 230% increase in productivity with the transparent window feature. It's like working with superman x-ray vision. Wait, nevermind, typical corporate workstation doesn't meet the specs for Aero mode.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 08, 2006 @11:18AM (#16066985)
      Simple. You just need to proactively synergize and globalize your corporate structures by empowering them with client-focused tools that Vista enables. With a little team building training in adaptive schedule compressing and knowledge base, you won't need Aero to envision strategically fit scenarios to really push the envelope of the quality vector in the company morale, mindset and credibility, not to mention revenue.
  • I think you mean impetus [reference.com]. Editors?
    • Re:Emphasis? (Score:4, Informative)

      by LearnToSpell (694184) on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:32AM (#16066575) Homepage
      Editors?

      [crickets chirping]

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by alienmole (15522)
      Who knows, maybe he meant onus [reference.com]. They all end in a similar "iss" sound after all, what kind of genius could possibly tell them apart?
    • by CandyMan (15493)
      I think he meant onus [reference.com] (literally, "burden"), that is: the ball is not on the EU's court, but on Microsoft.

      How working on last year's Office suite can curtail Europe's productivity escapes me completely.
      • How working on last year's Office suite can curtail Europe's productivity escapes me completely.

        How working on an OS without advanced DRM features can curtail Europe's productivity also escapes me, and is more relevant to this article. (Well, no, its not beyond me in either case: developing apps that work on Microsoft platforms or with Microsoft Office is a big field of endeavor by itself, and delay in access to the newest production version of either would be something of competitive disadvantage for th

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by DragonWriter (970822)
      I actually think that it is neither emphasis nor impetus, but burden, or onus [reference.com], that is intended here.
  • Circuitous logic? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Red Flayer (890720) on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:24AM (#16066516) Journal
    "Delaying the introduction in Europe, [members of the European Parliament] said in a letter made public by Microsoft on Thursday, 'would put European companies at a competitive disadvantage with every other company around the world who does have access to these new technologies.'"

    Nice business ya got there... would be a shame if anything 'happened' to it...

    Is it me, or is this just yet another example of MS abusing their monopoly? I see the logic, but can't understand the justification for this argument -- MS shouldn't have to comply with anti-monopoly regulations because any delay will hurt European businesses due to MS's monopoly?
    • by plague3106 (71849)
      How would pulling out of a market or not selling a product in Europe be abusing monopoly status? Europe doesn't HAVE to upgrade after all. There's nothing forcing them to not selling Vista at all in Europe.
      • I think its just a new revenue rasing method for the EU

        1) write to MS about possible issues that you may need to fine them another 1/4 billion for
        2) MS responds with possible fixes for the issues as asks if these address the problem
        3) EU says its not thier job to say if it addresses the problem or not, but they better just release it
        4) ??????
        5) Profit!!!!
    • What confuses me is how much of a disadvantage can a company be in if they are running one version behind? Wouldn't that maybe make them a little better off, look at teh support base that exists for WinXP, what about all the holes that will be exposed in Vista in the first few days months etc. Its not like as soon as Vista comes out all the XP software will just stop working...
    • by twitter (104583) on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:49AM (#16066717) Homepage Journal

      Is it me, or is this just yet another example of MS abusing their monopoly? I see the logic, but can't understand the justification for this argument -- MS shouldn't have to comply with anti-monopoly regulations because any delay will hurt European businesses due to MS's monopoly?

      Yes, the ultimate harm of monopoly is exclusion. Competitors are not allowed to offer better goods and services and the monopolist is able to deny service to any they please.

      This time, it's pure bullshit and won't work. No business that waits for Vista will be at a competitive disavantage. It's the businesses that adopt yet another secret format for communications that will have problems. It is incredible that M$ tries to spin abuse of formats into some kind of advantage. It took years for XP to gain any significant business presence and to this day, many if not most businesses use w2k. Sensible companies store their publications in PDF that can come from any source. We've all been through this song and dance before and most are sick of it. The massive inefficiency of the M$ upgrade train is the motivator for mass migration. Vista is going to flop when people see that it's only feature is buggy access to ancient non free music and movies. Superior alternatives exist and have been adopted by many, such as Lowes, IBM, Chrysler and countless small businesses and individuals. The Microsoft monopoly is cracked and will soon shatter.

      • Yes, the ultimate harm of monopoly is exclusion.
        MSFT is basically saying to the EU, "NO SOUP FOR YOU!"
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by AeroIllini (726211)
        The Microsoft monopoly is cracked...

        Don't worry; they'll release a patch in a few days.
    • As much as I hate Microsoft, think they are truly evil abusive monopolist scum, and also think part of what you say is probably true...

      Do you want to do business with someone who can hit you for billion dollar fines unless the rules are absolutely crystal clear and carved in stone?

      To me, as a microsoft basher, EU seemed very aggressive on this (to make a point that they were not kidding). The first fine was probably a "cost of doing business". The second set of fines was pretty harsh and got M$'s attentio
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by 1u3hr (530656)
        . So now M$ will want to know *very* clearly where the line is so they do not even get near it.

        Thay knew very clearly where the line was. They were told over and opver. They thought they could ignore it, as they did in the US.

  • by rizole (666389) <rizole.gmail@com> on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:24AM (#16066520) Homepage
    Windows Genuine Advantage.
  • by Anonymous Monkey (795756) on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:25AM (#16066527)
    ...So they won't see it until 2025? But the rest of the world will see it in 2023?
  • One of many (Score:3, Insightful)

    by andrewman327 (635952) on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:26AM (#16066531) Homepage Journal
    It seems that Microsoft is at least making a superficial attempt to get things right this time around. A quick Google search [google.com] shows how many delays there have already been. I doubt that having to wait a little longer will negatively impact anyone. After all, how many companies rush out and buy the latest OS in the month that it is released? I see potential problems for OEMs, but the average company waits for patches and better stability before adoption.
    • by saskboy (600063)
      I already have people telling me they want the next system after Windows XP. I tell them it's called Windows Vista, and that they probably don't want it because it won't be as good as XP. It will force them to buy a new computer, and will lock them out of many things they want to do like copying DVDs. I let them know that Ubuntu can do everything they'll want their computer to do, and they won't have to pay $300 to get it.

      The delay of Vista in Europe is a victory for free and open source software.
    • I doubt that having to wait a little longer will negatively impact anyone. After all, how many companies rush out and buy the latest OS in the month that it is released? I see potential problems for OEMs, but the average company waits for patches and better stability before adoption.

      Are aware of the expensive code assurance programs M$ sold a few year back? Promissing to release all sorts of feature filled improvements in the near future since 2002, M$ suckered lots of big companies into buying software

  • by Theovon (109752) on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:26AM (#16066532)
    Personally, I think companies that rely exclusively on Windows are shooting themselves in the foot. These days, there are numerous technologies people can use to make portable applications, including Java, C# (yes), Python, Perl, Tcl/Tk, WxWidgets, Qt, GTK, PHP and other web technologies, etc.

    Portability isn't everything, but relying on a single, unreliable vendor is lunacy.

    It's amazing how many IT people I've met who have "heard" or Linux. All they've ever known is Windows. Perhaps Microsoft's failures will encourage developers to investigate alternative platforms. Windows is important, and you should support that platform, but when Windows fails you, you really need to have a backup plan.
    • Portability isn't everything, but relying on a single, unreliable vendor is lunacy.
      Microsoft's attempt at extortion may very well back-fire. Europeans seem much more open to realistic consideration of alternate solutions to Microsoft products and services. Microsoft may not understand that their influence in Europe is not quite like the hypnotic hold they have over corporate management here in the United States.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Skuld-Chan (302449)
      Anyone who has had to support applications written in Java would probably disagree with you. I had to support a java based server application. Getting it to run on the app server (jboss, websphere, etc) for clients often meant doing it for them either remotely or onsite and even then it was a huge pain in the arse.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:26AM (#16066533)
    ... Microsoft is considering renaming Windows Vista to Windows Atlantis.
  • by malsdavis (542216) * on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:26AM (#16066535)
    "would put European companies at a competitive disadvantage with every other company around the world who does have access to these new technologies."

    What Dribble. Does that mean all those companies still using Windows 2000 / NT are at a competitive disadvantage with companies who got conned into upgrading to the virtually identical Windows XP?

    I fail to see what competitive advantage Vista will give businesses who upgrade to it immediatly. Maybe companies could run into problems in 5 years time when compatability issues arise, but not in the short/medium term.

    • Well, seeing as it takes a good long time to get these things installed, if you don't start immediately, after 5 years you'd be only at 50% completed instead of 80 or 90% like your competitors?
      • by WebCowboy (196209) on Friday September 08, 2006 @11:11AM (#16066930)
        ...is the same as Microsofts:

        if you don't start immediately, after 5 years you'd be only at 50% completed instead of 80 or 90% like your competitors?

        And your point is...? I know of no busines in existence in the world today that states in its mission statement that "we shall strive to complete a softweare upgrade rollout faster than any of our competitors"--there is no point to have a goal of getting all employees upgraded to the latest OS before everyone else. Businesses strive to offer the best quality of product or service, or to be the lowest-cost supplier, or be among the best employers, or be first to market with a new invention. These goals have little to do with what OS a company runs on their computers.

        I know, it certainly could put a company at a disadvantage if it was still running ancient VAX machinesand had DEC VT green-screen termials and '386 PCs running Windows 3.1 for Workgroups on people's desks. However there has to be a balance--a company that hastily rolls out a new release of software just so it can get there first is at an equal disadvantage as the company that limps alog on ancient unsupported software and hardware. In fact, upgrading too quickly can be MORE costly to a business than waiting too long. This is especially the case with closed, commercial software because of added licensing costs.

        Here is what I found was the case with nearly ALL the companies who upgraded their Windows boxes to XP before SP1, or 2003 before it was ready: the licensing costs were at their highest at initial release, proper drivers were not available for all their hardware resulting in unanticipated hardware upgrade costs, they got smacked by extra vulnerabilities or bugs not present in older software, and important applications broke upon upgrade (in particular, custom applications, ERP/EAM/other enterprise apps, industrial software like HMIs PLC programming software and communications drivers and so on).

        I'd have to say MS has it backwards--the EU is helping enforce responsible behavior on its industries by delaying early adoption of unproven software, so it has the ADVANTAGE over the rest of the world. The best way to upgrade is to phase in new software gradually, for example as hardware is replaced, and periodically evaluate the benefits of upgrading. Quite often, there are no compelling benefits at all until the vendor starts dropping support. For example, only within the last year has it been justifiable to upgrade Win2k machines to XP just for the sake of upgrading--reason being is that some important new software and hardware support will not be available (things like Blu-Ray and HD-DVD media, and IE7, and limited support for SQL 2005 on win2k servers). For most companies I've dealt with, XP was not at all considered until SP1 was released, and even then the upgrade strategy was to phase it in as new machines came online.

        I think MS is just showing a bit of desperation in trying to get the Windows upgrade cycle back on track, as well as frustration at being reigned in by anti-trust regulations. I don't even think members of EU parliament are stupid enough to swallow such tripe.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Moby Cock (771358)
      There would be a disadvantage to PC OEMs. Should a European actually want Vista (God knows why, though) he could buy one as an American export. Thus isadvantaging European companies

      Overall though, I think you are right. There is hardly going to be a tangible disadvantage by the vast majority of companies. Most probably still use Windows 2000 and Office 2000. The upgrades from MS are never 'must-have's.
    • by Carewolf (581105)
      European software companies would have to acquire American versions which might possibly be locked against activation from Europe to make games or applications supporting Vista.

      If Microsoft completely locks out European companies access to Vista, the small European software developers will have a very difficult time.
      • by ynohoo (234463)
        "the small European software developers will have a very difficult time."

        Why, is Vista dropping support for Win32 apps? I though not.
        Will European developers not have access to the .NET framework? Too late.
        What is this "difficult time" of which you speak? Not having Mickysofts latest DRM? Ooh, I'm scared. [/sarcasm]
    • I fail to see what competitive advantage Vista will give businesses who upgrade to it immediatly. Maybe companies could run into problems in 5 years time when compatability issues arise, but not in the short/medium term.

      More to the point, I think any businesses who upgrade to Vista immediately will likely find themselves at a disadvantage. Even if we were to assume that Vista will be a great OS and offer lots of advantages, it still remains that there is not yet much support for it, and likely won't be fo

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Red Flayer (890720)
      I fail to see what competitive advantage Vista will give businesses who upgrade to it immediatly
      Any business that depends upon it customers having Vista. Like, say, media companies who want to take advantage of the DRM in Vista. Or, say, software developers who develop for Vista, who will be behind in taking advantage of the new market. Or, say, developers who make a living writing enhancements/extensions for other software.
  • Oh please (Score:3, Insightful)

    by alvinrod (889928) on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:29AM (#16066553)
    I can understand wanting to spin the situation to make it appear as though it's not their fault that there will be a delay, but are they really so naive as to believe the crap they're spouting about how not having Vista "would put European companies at a competitive disadvantage with every other company around the world who does have access to these new technologies"?

    I'm sure that there are a few businesses out there that still run Windows 2000 on their machines, and that even after Vista comes out, some companies will take several years before migrating away from XP. About the only way I could consider Microsoft's statement valid is if you consider the new technologies found in the new boxes that will be needed to run Vista, because the current hardware used might not be up to snuff.
    • It's the MoP saying that, not Microsoft.

    • Re:Oh please (Score:5, Insightful)

      by cyber-vandal (148830) on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:39AM (#16066637) Homepage
      It's not MS who've said that but four British MEPs, sadly unnamed, who show that they have the same grasp of technological issues as the average amoeba. I'd like to know who they are so I can set them straight, pointing out that if Microsoft would just obey the law this would be a non-issue.
      • It's not MS who've said that but four British MEPs, sadly unnamed, who show that they have the same grasp of technological issues as the average amoeba.

        Well, they can read MS fud^H^HPR statements, so at least they outsmart the amoeba when it comes to having reading skills.

      • by owlnation (858981)

        It's not MS who've said that but four British MEPs, sadly unnamed, who show that they have the same grasp of technological issues as the average amoeba.

        I think you could count the number of UK citizens who know the name of their MEP on one hand. Well, ok, it's in the 100s of 1000s but still a very small percentage of the UK population.

        The voter turn out is extremely low for EU elections. Generally the political parties field candidates in training - or just some muppet they can't fob off somewhere else

      • by alvinrod (889928)
        "It's not MS who've said that but four British MEPs"

        I think that if they really understood the issues in general they would not have made such a statement. Just because you're in government, doesn't necessarily mean that you're above being a corporate shill. No offense to the British, but I'm willing to bet that there are a few Ted Stevens over there as well that are just as ignorant when it comes to modern technology as he appears to be.

        If they were really concerned they'd probably be trying to work
      • The MEPs named (Score:3, Informative)

        by SpaceLifeForm (228190)
        Link [groklaw.net].

  • Sounds familiar (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Uukrul (835197) on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:32AM (#16066574)
    Sounds familiar to European PS3 Launch Delayed to 2007 [slashdot.org]

    Microsoft really seem to be shooting themselves in the foot lately, even if this isn't their fault.

    Consequently, the European Vista will be be bundled with Microsoft's new killer app, Duke Nukem Forever.

    One of Microsoft's biggest problems (along with their seemingly insane devotion to their own proprietary formats and obsession with control) is something they've always done: early overhype. The same thing happened with the Windows XP. They put out so much overblown hype early on in their product announcements (making ridiculous claims like "this will be more powerful than a supercomputer" and other such bunk) that later, inevitably, when they have to pull back and announce REAL specs and features, it comes off as a disappointment.
    They are nothing less than the victims of their own unrealistic promises.
    -Eric

    Sony for Microsoft
    Vista for PS3
    And so on...
  • On the one hand, yes, Microsoft evil. We know. Monopoly bad.

    But I can see their point. If the EU commission can go and levy arbitrary fines if it doesn't like what Microsoft does then I can see Microsoft wanting guidance before releasing a new product. I don't think the EU Commission has treated Microsoft fairly - their dealings seem to be tinged with a bit of anti-Americanism that seems to be all the rage in Europe of late.

    So I say go ahead, Microsoft, take your ball and go home (or at least don't let
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Tim C (15259)
      So I say go ahead, Microsoft, take your ball and go home (or at least don't let them play with it a little while) so that these power-tripping politicians can understand the consquences on their actions.

      And what exactly would those consequences be, other than MS locking itself out of a huge and growing market? Were this to happen, we'd just keep on using XP. If MS went all the way and refused to sell any copies of any of their software, there's a real chance that affected EU member states would simply (temp
      • by JakiChan (141719)
        And I'm sure if they did that then the US would not feel very compelled to honor any European copyrights. Do you really think they want to go down that path?
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          And I'm sure if the US did that, the EU would respond tit-for-tat. Do you really think the US will go to the mat for one company's IP rights given the potential loss of all American IP rights in the EU? Do you think that the EU would lose more from the loss of their IP protection in the US than the US would lose if it lost IP protection in the EU? Think of all the movies, music, etc. that we export. Do you think that the US government would risk that because Bill Gates was a whiny bitch?
      • by bfree (113420)
        If society is better served by ignoring a particular copyright, then it should be ignored.
        ... ignoring a particular copyright of a convicted abusive monopolist ...
        MS is still not complying with the previous judgement against them, I don't think it would be unrealistic to think that this could be continued to the point at which the court discards all MS EU copyrights and patents relating to the offending items.
      • by babbling (952366)
        If MS went all the way and refused to sell any copies of any of their software, there's a real chance that affected EU member states would simply (temporarily) revoke MS's copyrights

        If they did that, the EU would suddenly find themselves being described as "part of the axis of evil", and it wouldn't be long before the US tried to invade. The US wages war to ensure that their interests are not disturbed. Copyright is a huge export for the US.
      • by AceCaseOR (594637)

        The only thing I could really think of that would be "consequences" would be that European software developers would not have access to Vista, and thus, in theory, applications that those developers have in the pipeline for Vista would be delayed until they got the actual OS.

        (And I'm pretty sure these "consequences" I just made up are completely bogus anyway - as I have no experience developing software.)

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by d_jedi (773213)
      The EU commission has the attitude of an angry girlfriend/wife - "if you don't know why I'm mad at you, I'm not going to tell you". Damn.. I HATE it when I get that line. Sure MS does too..
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by VitaminB52 (550802)
      levy arbitrary fines

      Bullshit. There's nothing arbitraty about a fine that can (and should) be given to any compagny that violates a specific law. Other compagnies got this fine for violating the law, Microsoft violated the same law and should therefore pay the same fine (which the law defines as a certain maximum percentage of the companies income).

      There is nothing arbitrary at "violate the same law ==> pay the same fine".

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by bloodredsun (826017)

      I can see Microsoft wanting guidance before releasing a new product.

      Those guidelines already exist. They are the guidelines that every other manufacturer of software has to obey when they sell software in the EU. All the EU is saying is that MS aren't a special case, but must obey the rules just like everyone else.

      As an aside, why do you think that the EU treated them unfairly? What in particular bother you? And as for the "anti-Americanism that seems to be all the rage", what are you talking about? All I

      • by cp.tar (871488)

        that comment sounds like a persecution complex.

        So... you think it was George W. posting that?

        Actually, I'm glad that Americans started noticing the effect of their behaviour in the rest of the world.
        That's right: in general, you are not much liked.
        Even if it emerges only as a persecution complex, I find it relatively positive.
        At least you're becoming aware that there is a world outside your borders.

        Now, sorry if this sounded like preaching, and of course there are intelligent and educated Americans an

      • Not really.

        Some of the stuff with the media player seemed a bit arbitrary to me.

        I hate microsoft. I use open office. I try linux now and again but it's still not there for me but most of my tools are now on linux so when I finally make it, the pain will be less.

        Still, I think the most effective thing they can do is put the new operating system before the EU and ask them to raise any issues before it goes on sale so microsoft can fix them.
    • by babbling (952366)
      Please understand that Microsoft are pirates who abuse their monopoly status, to the disadvantage of regular people.
  • I wonder how business in europe will manage to live without the new important features in windows vista!
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/22/Long horn_RSoD.png [wikimedia.org] comes to mind as one of the more important features we need to get to market asap!
  • by Ozwald (83516) on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:52AM (#16066738)
    Slashdot sounds like those hockey commentary people...

    "Ballmer's got the CD and he's headed for the RTM... he shoots, OHH! A bug shuts him down!!! Oh that crowd is really upset"

    "Well Tim, that was a close one, he's oh for 10 now, he really needs a break"

    "Now Gentoo has control, passes it to Fedora, passes it to SuSE, passes it to Ubuntu, passes it back to SuSE... they seem to have their passing game working really well"

    "Well Tim, they have heart but only a small group of the audience seems to be cheering for them"

    Sorry.

    Oz
  • Honestly (Score:2, Redundant)

    by Rik Sweeney (471717)
    Why does Microsoft have to copy everything Sony does?
  • Well, if we consider that about 40% of computer illegal software, they can delay all they want - they'll get it.
    And as for those of us in Europe who like genue software, it's a ":(("
  • Europeans are so lucky. They have a built-in excuse to skip the initital wave of problems and go right to SP1.
  • by duden (990404) on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:55AM (#16066775)
    Oh boy, these guys in Redmond...do they actually believe their flagship product is providing competitive advantages? Someone needs a reality check. Clearly no version of Windows since, shall we say, 2k have given companies any form for cost savings, productivity improvements or the like. The only European companies in competitive disadvantage is the IT implementors, who might have to wait a bit in getting hold of their upgrade service fees. But then again, show me a successful corporation who installs OS'es imediately after releases. Way too big a risk! At least for the banks it's a cycle of easily 1-2 years delay before they are going to install it company wide. And who knows, by then we might even be able to install OS X on non-Apple boxes. As a European, I feel rather relieved!
  • disadvantage? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by pe1chl (90186) on Friday September 08, 2006 @10:59AM (#16066818)
    put European companies at a competitive disadvantage with every other company around the world who does have access to these new technologies.

    It could also put them at a competitive advantage by using stable technologies while their foreign competitors play with new thingies.
    By the time it gets introduced in Europe, the others have already found the first bugs and Microsoft may have fixed some of them.
  • by Kenja (541830) on Friday September 08, 2006 @11:09AM (#16066914)
    But I sure cant find em...

    MS: I eventually had to go down to the cellar to find them.
    EU: Thats the Display Department.
    MS: With a torch.
    EU: The lights had probably gone.
    MS: So had the stairs.
    EU: But you found the plans, didnt you?
    MS: Oh yes, they were on display in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying Beware of the leopard.
  • by Alphager (957739) <florian.haas@NOspAM.gmail.com> on Friday September 08, 2006 @11:30AM (#16067080) Homepage Journal
    These are pure lies by Microsoft to gain some PR-advantage against the European Union. The EU has issued a statement that the release-date of Vista is 100% in the hands of Microsoft and that it does not intend to interfere(see http://www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/77945 [heise.de] for a german news-post about it). The EU had issued in january a questionaire to MS about the conformity of Vista to the several sentences MS got because of it's monopoly. MS answered LAST WEEK. This is not different to the US-market: MS has to conform to certain rules because of several past lawsuits. MS knew this from the start. If it does not conform, it is 100% MS's fault.
  • Over what? Those rival companies running Linux or BSD? Pull the other one!
  • by Anonymous Coward
    No company worth anything would be putting Vista into production use until at least SP1 arrives. So who gives a toss if it is delayed a bit. If a company really, really wants Vista then they can buy it over the internet. If for some reason M$ stops resellers sending it to Europe then there would be many law suits heading their way. If this were the case, then any company who legally wanted to get their hands on a copy only has to send someone over the pond and walk into any Best Buy and purchase one for har
  • Wholy crap! The arrogance. They got nailed, and nailed reasonably hard for their anti-competitive monopolished behaviour by the EU (something the US failed to follow through with when Bush took over), and now they're coming up with excuses for punishing Europe for it? Wholy crap. If this isn't a "don't fuck with us ever again" message, I don't know what is. I would say the EU shouldn't simply play dumb ("we never caused a delay") but make it clear what the guidelines are (which I'm sure they already ha
  • Trying ... (Score:4, Funny)

    by lorg (578246) on Friday September 08, 2006 @12:08PM (#16067364)
    Trying to care, trying to care, trying to care ... Sorry it ain't happenin'. Come back when there is something that actually matters.
  • by CrazedWalrus (901897) on Friday September 08, 2006 @01:15PM (#16067885) Journal
    First:

    "Delaying the introduction in Europe [...] would put European companies at a competitive disadvantage with every other company around the world who does have access to these new technologies.'"

    Awww. Cry, Baby, Cryyyy! Look, whether it was justified or not, the fact remains that they did everything possible to make life difficult for MS. I know some will say that it was a slap on the wrist, others will say that what the EU commission did was unjustified. The fact remains that MS was singled out and (very) publicly sanctioned. I think this is MS's way of poking back, and reminding the EU that they aren't, in fact, required to sell their software in Europe. Maybe now the EU understands that MS can bite back, too.

    Second, maybe the EU will recognize the importance of shifting away from MS software, and possibly even offer incentives of some sort. If a single foreign company can put every EU company at a competitive disadvantage, willfully or otherwise, maybe it's time to seriously re-evaluate your dependencies. Linux may be behind in some specific areas, but if the EU were to fund serious development to bring it up to speed, that gap would close in a hurry, and soon those using MS products would be the ones at a "competitive disadvantage" for every checkbox on the scorecard.

    So, I repeat: Cry, Baby, Cryyyy! When you're done, get off your asses and fund development of a viable alternative. Solve your own problems, and stop your frikkin whining. It's not like you're strapped for cash on the scale of a moderate corporate IT development project.

    /American

Those who do not understand Unix are condemned to reinvent it, poorly. - Henry Spencer, University of Toronto Unix hack

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