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Stephen Hawking Looking for Assistant 215

Posted by samzenpus
from the update-your-resume dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Wanted: Bright graduate student to assist world-famous scientist. International travel, developing computer systems and dealing with the press required. Renowned astrophysicist and best-selling author Stephen Hawking has announced he is looking for a graduate student to work for him for one to two years. Dust off those CVs, kids!"
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Stephen Hawking Looking for Assistant

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  • by catbutt (469582) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @08:35PM (#16056487)
    (goodbye, karma! :)
    • by solevita (967690) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @08:39PM (#16056513)
      >One purpose of the job was to aid the professor in areas which he has difficulty due to his disability, the posting said.

      Bedpans. And walking upstairs with a prof. over one shoulder.

      I've submitted my CV.
      • by megaditto (982598) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @09:12PM (#16056654)
        Should be noted that there are allegations that Dr. Hawking is into either spousal abuse roleplay. Last years there were pictures of injuries to Dr. Hawking consistent with the above practice, a police inquiry was initiated; to this, Dr. Hawking responded: "mind your own business".

        Would the assistant be expected to participate in a practice such as this?

        A side note: men with ALS are capable of eye control, sphincter control (they do not pee or shit themselves uncontrollably), as well as able to have erections and orgasms. Only motor neurons are affected while the full sensory input is retained.

        Another side note: it is not definite that Dr. Hawking actually has ALS (as opposed to some other neurodegenerative disorder). He is the only known ALS patient known to survive for this long, and he has consistently refused any advanced ALS testing.
        • by voice_of_all_reason (926702) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @09:40PM (#16056734)
          and.who.is.the.journal.of.quantum.medicine.going.t o.beleive?
        • ALS (Score:5, Interesting)

          by jd (1658) <imipak@noSPam.yahoo.com> on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @10:04PM (#16056839) Homepage Journal
          It's probably not going to be easy to diagnose at this stage - not only because it likely advanced far beyond the point 99.9% of sufferers would be tested, making any kind of direct comparison impossible, but also because he has survived so long, and we therefore have no data whatsoever on what ALS would look like at this point, and also because the disease has not progressed significantly for some time - it stopped and even reversed a very little at one point. Sure, you can study the existing damage, but without an active element, there would be nothing to test for.


          Actually, it shouldn't be too hard to identify the illness, even from an armchair, for exactly the reasons I outlined. The number of neurologically degenerative diseases that actually spontaneously go into remission is not exactly high. That alone should eliminate the vast majority of ALS-like diseases to something much more manageable. We also have video footage from different stages. Horison did a documentary on Professor Hawking prior to him losing his speech to the trachea operation. We certainly have video footage of him since. Again, that should allow you to exclude certain possibilities. Finally, although a lot of his body has no motor control worth speaking of, his hands most evidently do as that is how he controls the chair and the voice synthesizer, although he's not exactly a speed demon on typing with it. His face also does - he doesn't lack the ability to show emotions.


          Oh, that made me think of something else. Those are the same muscles he pushed the hardest from shortly before being diagnosed until he became a total invalid. He would swing on trees extensively, according to his mother in one documentary. It's suspected his heavy physical exercise regimen may have contributed to the disease slowing down and stopping later on in his life, but I believe it to be highly significant that the muscles he pushed the most suffered the least. Again, that can't possibly be characteristic of too many conditions.


          From these well-documented and well-established facts, it should be easy to go through those conditions which Professor Hawking might have and discard those that simply don't behave in the way observed. (Or, to pull a Sherlock Holmes, reject the impossible and whatever is left - however improbable - must be correct. This doesn't work in practice for most things, but in this one case, there will be few enough possibilities that eliminating the impossible should be very doable indeed.)

          • Re:ALS (Score:5, Interesting)

            by Lord Aurora (969557) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @11:29PM (#16057129)
            Or, to pull a Sherlock Holmes, reject the impossible and whatever is left - however improbable - must be correct.

            Actually, that's technically pulling an Occam, as it's a variation on Occam's Razor [wikipedia.org]. Yeah, yeah, Holmes said it like that, but Occam's razor is generally thought to be the foundation for Holmes' theory. Er...Doyle's theory, as it were.

            • Re:ALS (Score:5, Funny)

              by bigpat (158134) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @11:36PM (#16057146)
              Actually, that's technically pulling an Occam, as it's a variation on Occam's Razor [wikipedia.org]. Yeah, yeah, Holmes said it like that, but Occam's razor is generally thought to be the foundation for Holmes' theory. Er...Doyle's theory, as it were.

              ya well... no shit, Shirlock.
            • Re:ALS (Score:4, Insightful)

              by jmhoule314 (921571) <<moc.liamg> <ta> <413eluohmj>> on Thursday September 07, 2006 @10:17AM (#16059016)
              "Actually, that's technically pulling an Occam, as it's a variation on Occam's Razor. Yeah, yeah, Holmes said it like that, but Occam's razor is generally thought to be the foundation for Holmes' theory. Er...Doyle's theory, as it were."

              Actually I think you are dead wrong here. Occam's razor states that you should always choose the least complicated explanation. With Holmes practice deductional observation the more complicated theory is just as or more likely to be the one that actually occurred. Just because it seems simple when Holmes is done explaining it doesnt mean that it was the less complicated scenario. The least complicated scenario, if you have actually read any of the stories, is invariably selected by Inspector lastrade.

              Take the case of 'The six Napoleans'. Lastrade comes to holmes with a case where a man is breaking into peoples houses to smash their busts of napolean. One of the simplest explinations is Lastrade's , "he's a nut, simply a nut", if I remember right. As it turns out it is because the man is smashing the busts because there is the bounty from a robery hidden inside of the six napoleans that all came from the same mold where the man use to work.

              I know that there are better examples than the one that I used but it is the first that came to mind and is the one that required the least typing. I suspect you misunderstand Holmes when he says stuff like 'simplicity my dear watson' which I beleive to be a sort of arrogant irony. I also suspect that you threw this out there because you wanted us all to think that you are smart, even though the only reason that you know the term Occamm's razor is because it has been popularized in many TV shows and movies(originally in Contact?). For that, I forgive you. But dont misanalyze the legend that is Sherlock Holmes
        • by Penguinshit (591885) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @10:16PM (#16056888) Homepage Journal

          The "advanced testing" of ALS involves demonstrated upper and lower motor neuron damage with all other known causes (Lyme's, etc.) ruled out. Professor Hawking has already had "advanced testing".

          I know, because I was diagnosed two years ago.

        • by Jugalator (259273)
          He is the only known ALS patient known to survive for this long, and he has consistently refused any advanced ALS testing.

          I knew it! He's just faking it all as a PR stunt!
        • by 10Ghz (453478)
          A side note: men with ALS are capable of eye control, sphincter control (they do not pee or shit themselves uncontrollably), as well as able to have erections and orgasms.


          Thanks for the mental image, dude! Stephen Hawking.... *shudder*.
      • by johansalk (818687)
        > Bedpans. And walking upstairs with a prof. over one shoulder.

        And if you slip him off and he cracks his head you get a global ass-pummeling.
    • by fm6 (162816)
      This is Slashdot! Bad taste == Funny.
    • by fireman sam (662213) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @10:27PM (#16056917) Homepage Journal
      Assistant: Time to wipe your ass.
      Hawking: I prefer to call it a Hawking hole.
  • by TylerTheGreat (848804) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @08:35PM (#16056488)
    I can't wait to see NBC's new reality show, The Assistant starring Stephen Hawking. Now, that would be good television.
  • by Mancat (831487) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @08:35PM (#16056489) Homepage
    I don't know anything about physics but dude, I will get you laid. And you're probably all like, "but I'm paralyzed." Dude, you don't even know. The bitches I know don't give a fuck. I'm tellin' you man they're crazy!

    Hope to hear back from you!
    • I don't think he needs you to help him get laid. Hasn't he had like three wives?

      I remember once reading an interview with him, in which it was mentioned that one of the first things he always likes to show visitors is the picture of himself with Marilyn Monroe.
    • by BobNET (119675) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @08:57PM (#16056598)
      The bitches I know don't give a fuck. I'm tellin' you man they're crazy!

      But Stephen Hawking himself is Crazy As Fuck [mchawking.com]!

      Straight out of Oxford a crazy motherfucker named Hawking.
      When I be rocking the mic you be gawking,
      at me 'cause I'm a bad mama-jamma,
      you wanna lock me up put my ass in the slamma.
      But fuck that shit 'cause no jail can hold me,
      you can't even catch me much less control me.
      So if you see me coming you better duck,
      'cause Stephen Hawking is crazy as fuck.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @08:36PM (#16056494)
    "Wanted: Bright graduate student to assist world-famous scientist. International travel, developing computer systems and dealing with the press required.

    *sniff*
    Mommmeeee!
  • by TheOtherKiwi (743507) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @08:39PM (#16056506) Homepage Journal
    He should run a TV show to find his next apprentice...oh, whoops.
  • Yes, but... (Score:5, Funny)

    by abes (82351) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @08:42PM (#16056532) Homepage
    the chances of getting the job are astronomically low. Besides, you're thesis will probably just get black-holed. Perhaps it's worth getting the position still, for all the star-power?

    Sorry, couldn't resist. I understand if you have to mod me down.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @08:45PM (#16056542)
    My firefox tabs loads: Stephen Hawking Looking for Ass...
  • The link (Score:5, Informative)

    by Lithgon (896737) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @08:45PM (#16056543)
    Here is the link to the job listing. http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/offices/personnel/jobs/ vacancies.cgi?job=670 [cam.ac.uk]
  • ... those phone-sex recordings of him.
  • Kind of a long commitment, especially considering that Hawking has ALS and could croak at any time -- the fact that he has been living with a disease that kills 95% of its sufferers within 5 years of diagnosis for 45 years vastly increases the chance of him dying at any moment.

    Cool links. [blogspot.com]
    • Yeah, but go figure (Score:4, Interesting)

      by PCM2 (4486) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @11:07PM (#16057058) Homepage
      Kind of a long commitment, especially considering that Hawking has ALS and could croak at any time
      You've heard him talk. For TV interviews and the like, he usually has a number of preprogrammed responses for likely questions etc. An original response to a question takes a long time for him to cue up. So go figure how long it must take him to write and edit a book (for example). This assistant position is likely to be quite demanding, not the least of which requiring a lot of patience. One to two years sounds like a relatively brief time.
      • Probably he just needs to dictate a letter...
      • For TV interviews and the like, he usually has a number of preprogrammed responses for likely questions etc.

        One of the most cringeworthy pieces of television I've ever seen was when Hawking was on live TV in the UK. The bonehead presenter asked a question that wasn't prearranged. This was followed by the most awkward two minutes of standing around that I've witnessed.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @08:51PM (#16056568)
    Graduate Student A: I can't. This matrix is too big
    Stephen Hawking: Size matters not. Look at me. Judge me by my size, do you? Hmm? Hmm. And well you should not. For my ally is the Force, and a powerful ally it is. Life creates it, makes it grow. Its energy surrounds us and binds us. Luminous beings are we, not this crude matter. You must feel the Force around you; here, between you, me, the tree, the rock, everywhere, yes. Even between the land and the ship.



    Stephen Hawking: Why wish you become physicist?
    Graduate Student B: Well, mostly because of my father, I guess.
    Stephen Hawking: Ahh, physicist. Powerful physicist was he. Powerful physicist.
    Graduate Student B: How could you know my father? You don't even know who I am. Oh, I don't even know what I'm doing here! We're wasting our time!
    Stephen Hawking: [Looking away from Graduate Student B] I cannot teach him. The boy has no patience.
    Albert Einstein: He will learn patience.
    Stephen Hawking: Much anger in him... like his father.
    Albert Einstein: Was I any different when you taught me?
    • by 10Ghz (453478)
      Stephen Hawking: Much anger in him... like his father.
      Albert Einstein: Was I any different when you taught me?


      While travelling near FTL-speeds could help you travel to the future, I don't think it's possible to travel back in time. In short: your script sucks! Back to the drawing-board buddy!
  • by eebra82 (907996) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @08:54PM (#16056583) Homepage
    I believe he left out a few requirements, so here they are.
    • You may not loop around me with a Segway. EVER.
    • You may not replace my speech tool with a southern state gay accent. It aggrevates me.
    • You may not stack pornography in "A Brief History of Time" and "The Universe in a Nutshell".
    • You may not answer my great question, "How can the human race survive the next hundred years" with anything related to Star Trek or Star Wars anecdotes.
    • You may not ask me to do a 360 with my vehicle.
    • You may not replace pawns with queens once they've reached the other end of the chess table.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      > You may not replace pawns with queens once they've reached
      > the other end of the chess table.

      Assuming you could get pawns that far on Hawking... Why the fuck not?
  • Applicants must provide their own Star Wars voice changer for use when addressing Mr. Hawking.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Your dyslexia got that part backwards. "Applicants must provide their own Star Wars voice addresser when changing Mr. Hawking".
  • Not a student.. (Score:5, Informative)

    by paxmaniac (988091) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @09:07PM (#16056634)
    The headline is a bit inaccurate.

    If you read the advertisement, it seeks a "recent graduate", not a "graduate student". This is definitely a job, not a studentship. Do not expect to come out of it with a graduate degree. That aside, there are plenty of other reasons to see it as an appealing opportunity.
    • Re:Not a student.. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Mr. Roadkill (731328) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @09:23PM (#16056683)
      That aside, there are plenty of other reasons to see it as an appealing opportunity.
      The biggest, and only one that really counts? He's Stephen Hawking.
    • Re:Not a student.. (Score:4, Interesting)

      by archen (447353) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @10:46PM (#16056996)
      Well if you're going for a sort of academic career, then the next "level" I would think would be this sort of apprenticeship. Which would be pretty cool considering there are many people capable of getting a doctorate, but only one such opportunity to work for Stephen Hawking. I imagine that if you could land that job then your resume would only need one sentence. "Stephen Hawking picked ME to work for him".
  • by circletimessquare (444983) <[moc.liamg] [ta] [erauqssemitelcric]> on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @09:27PM (#16056699) Homepage Journal
    no matter smart you are, everyone will immediately think of you as pinky in pinky and the brain [wikipedia.org], as compared to your boss, so please have a healthy ego
    • by soft_guy (534437)
      no matter smart you are, everyone will immediately think of you as pinky in pinky and the brain, as compared to your boss, so please have a healthy ego

      Yeah, cause every time you meet someone with an assistant, some lame cartoon is the first thing that comes to mind.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by jamstar7 (694492)
      "Pinky, are you pondering what I'm pondering?"

      "I think so, Brain, but where are we going to find a herd of yaks, a box of latex gloves, and a swimming pool filled with vaseline at this time of night?"

  • by gatkinso (15975) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @09:30PM (#16056707)
    ...and was currently battling some sort of trouble on the moon.
  • Alas I am too old and creaky and the wrong discipline, computer science, myself to qualify for job. But what a chance! To actually live, rather than read, those books and concepts that Hawkings ponders. What a way to expand one's imagination. Then the quotidian tasks for a person of this intellectual stature would seem light.

    My sincere and most envious congratulations to whomever gets this position,
    Jim
    • "Then the quotidian tasks"

      That's exactly what I was thinking, except for your use of the word "quotidian" which I don't think I've ever seen used in conversation before. Encountering new words is fun, especially when encountered "in the wild" so to speak. ;-) As far as "quotidian" tasks are concerned however, I'm sure it's just as unpleasant to change Professor Hawking's diapers as anyone else's.
    • by soft_guy (534437)
      But what a chance! To actually live, rather than read, those books and concepts that Hawkings ponders. What a way to expand one's imagination.

      All that from emptying bedpans?
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by JavaManJim (946878)
      Bedpans and diapers. There is something to be learned even by emptying bedpans and wiping from diapers. Life is not all sweetness and light. Drudgery too offers dimensions to grow. Depends on what you think about when your mind is .0001% occupied. Even then, you are doing a good thing for that person and thus mankind.

      Then for the other 99.9999%. For math things and my mind. I create a mental ball within my mind, a virtual brain if you will, and let that intuitively come back with my answer. One of my proje
    • I dunno...I heard Hawking give a real physics seminar (at Berkeley, circa 1988). I don't mean the popular gee-whiz First Five Minutes Of The Universe kind of thing. Now, I'm not a doofus when it comes to physics -- I took courses in quantum field theory and sat in on a GR class -- but I wasn't a cosmology graduate student. From that perspective, Hawking's talk stopped making much sense about 90 seconds after it started, except for brief lucid moments in the middle.

      I mean, fair enough. He was talking to
  • by Almost-Retired (637760) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @09:43PM (#16056745)
    And so far, in the 26 messages posted, I have detected damned little respect for the perservereance and intelligence of the man, who does after all, hold the Issac Newton Chair in Mathematics at Cambridge, no small feat by itself. To me that apparent lack of respect is most sad.

    Here we have a man, who perhaps because of his disability, is giving his brain exersize that the rest of his body will never get, a man who has contributed much to our knowledge of the universe, and who may yet deduce the causitive reason for the accelleration we are seeing of distant objects before he passes.

    As for his passing, I'd imagine that his health is monitored at least 10 times more diligently than any of us do for ourselves. That will see to it that the age related degenerative things are kept in check as best we know how to do. However, the real monitoring is more likely concentrated on the treatment of bedsores and that sort of thing, as well as maintaining his immune system as best we (the medical professions 'we') can. However, he has a resident rn to handle the bedpanish and bedsores sorts of things, so those duties would not normally fall to the assistant.

    If I were 50 years younger, I'd kill for a chance at that job. Unforch, my experience level at 50 years ago wouldn't have allowed me to do what he needs done today. Without formal schooling, it does take a while to arrive at that point of having the knowledge needed.

    --
    Cheers, Gene

    • by luder (923306) * <slashdot@NOSPam.lbras.net> on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @10:04PM (#16056842)
      Have you ever watched the two Simpsons episodes starring Stephen Hawking (They Saved Lisa's Brain [imdb.com] and Don't Fear the Roofer [imdb.com])? If you didn't, then watch and you'll see that even him has no problem in joking about his own condition.
    • That's correct; Slashdot has deftly changed from being a discussion of those metaphorical front-benchers, to bar-room banter from the backbenchers. Nerds have become bullies at roughly about the same time when geekdom became mainstream.

      As for me, I came into this discussion trusting that the Slashdot hive mind will use its Google-fu and find the only link [slashdot.org] I'm really interested in. The rest is all hubris.

    • Well, you're talking about /. Respect for Stephen Hawking is a given in this crowd.
    • by daemonenwind (178848) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @11:54PM (#16057195)
      Once you put someone - anyone - beyond all ability to be ridiculed, you put their life and opinions above the realm where people may discuss it as one of their own.

      We human beings make fun of our own. We human beings kid around, tease, and poke at each other. Did you see the American show, "Last Comic Standing"? Josh Blue, a comic on there, had a solid case of cerebal palsy, as evidenced by his constant, jerky motion.

      You know why he won?

      The guy could laugh at himself. He could laugh at us laughing at him. He could laugh at stereotypes. He could laugh.

      Maybe you could learn something about yourself from Josh.

      Nothing in this thread so far - my earlier jest included - is so spiteful and cruel that even Steven himself couldn't get a chuckle from it.

      Maybe the problem is that some people in this world take themselves and their conditions too damn seriously.

      Strike that, I'm sure that's the problem.
    • by xee (128376) on Thursday September 07, 2006 @12:14AM (#16057277) Journal
      He holds the Lucasian Chair. Isaac Newton was a previous holder of this chair, but it was not motorized back then. It is of course named for the benefactor of the chair, George Lucas.
    • "the man, who does after all, hold the Issac Newton Chair in Mathematics at Cambridge"

      It's actually the Lucasian Chair of Mathematics http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucasian_Professor [wikipedia.org]. Sir Isaac Newton was a previous holder of the position.
      • Which explains my confusion when a previous commentor here used the name George Lucas as the benefactor who originally endowed that chair. Henry Lucas, a 'Reverend', who actually did it in 1640 or so, is an entirely different fish from George, or even the Lucas Electric people who were best known for the quality of their parts in english vehicles of 50 years ago, earning them the honorary title of "Prince of Darkness" because they never worked.

        Thanks for the link that clarifies that, I hadn't thought to lo
    • All right, I'll say it:

      The guy has done something that even einstein couldn't do: He made serious physics breakthroughs accessible to and understandable for the little guys, those of us who DON'T get it and need someone to not talk down to us while we try.

      he's almost unreal for most of us, a kind of science god. His illness is our only reminder that he's one of us at all. I applaud him for being able to laugh at it, while i am overwhelmed by his science-fu.

      I'm not qualified for the job, but i envy t
      • Thanks, thats more along the lines of the sort of a post I was hoping to see. And like you, I'm not qualified, and too damned old to boot, but that sure doesn't stop me from envying the lucky person who does get that job. He will have a little insight when he comes away, of how a great mind works.

        --
        Cheers, Gene
    • by arth1 (260657)

      And so far, in the 26 messages posted, I have detected damned little respect for the perservereance and intelligence of the man, who does after all, hold the Issac Newton Chair in Mathematics at Cambridge, no small feat by itself. To me that apparent lack of respect is most sad.

      Why should one respect a CHAIR? The higher the chair, the higher the likelihood that the position was not obtained due to skills, but politics. You can respect Stephen Hawking for his works -- or not, depending on whether you fin

  • by chez69 (135760) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @10:05PM (#16056843) Homepage Journal
    must look really hot in lab coat
  • Do we get dibs on the sweet wheelchair if he dies?
    • by Arimus (198136)
      Nope, the BBC props department want it back, Davros is still complaining that they gave his chair away and if its not returned he will unleash his daleks (He's only got the MK I's left so we can all hide upstairs).
  • by Cycnus (162186) * on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @10:27PM (#16056919) Homepage
    I've recently watched a BBC Horizon episode "The Hawking Paradox" (available on BT I believe) where you see him working with his current assistant, a young French mathematician, and you must admire the patience of Hawking and the people around him to actually get communication flowing.
    Hawking's ability to use his clicker to pick-up words on his computer has deteriorated and making a sentence is a really tough job for him: you have to guess what he wants to say and watch his eyes for confirmation... it must be a maddening thing to know all that knowledge and all those ideas bottled up inside that brain that can barely communicate a few words a minute...

    With all our technology, you'd think that we could do a better job of helping people with such crippling diseases to allow them communicate more fluently.

    It's sad that this great mind may never be able to give us all it can, even if some of his ideas end up being wrong, there is still enough material there to make great advances in science.

    • by knifey (976510) on Thursday September 07, 2006 @02:47AM (#16057734)
      The communication thing would eventually frustrate the most calm of us. I think most slashdotters could (if forced, I doubt many would choose) deal with quadraplegia. To loose even the ability to (easily) communicate must be incredibly frustrating.

      But, as for reading eye movements and guessing words etc, he's obviously after a male who's been married for years. That should get me modded down by half the population. :-).

      But seriously, eye and facial (of which, SH must be slowly loosing both) movement is a significant slice of communication and more so with people who know each other well/long. What's gotta be troublesome is communicating complex ideas like physics. Baffled as to how he can continue to work.

  • by jayegirl (26328) on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @10:36PM (#16056963) Homepage
    Just remember that if you get the job, the words "My daleks are supreme" are your cue to pull the plug.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 06, 2006 @11:52PM (#16057189)

    I was Hawking's assistant a few years ago. It's a great job, but one that I would not want to revisit. For a smart young dude it provides a great opportunity to travel and grow personally whilst dealing with some of the greatest and ost disparate minds and egos on the planet.

    As for what I had to do for him, remember that there is a team of equally dedicated nurses to attend to personal needs.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      some of the greatest and most disparate minds and egos on the planet.

      And that's the real rub - his ego can be a bit, shall we say awkward. I'd expect you'd need a very thick skin to deal with him on a day to day basis, unless he's mellowed a LOT over time.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 07, 2006 @02:27AM (#16057688)
    Obviously trying to avoid listing fees by releasing it as a "story".

    Nah. He should post it on Monster.

    He can get tens of thousands of cookie-cutter CVs that say "I studied Java, which is a lot like Cosmology. No one understands it either."

    "I did some C#, which is a lot like Creationism."

    Discuss.
  • by dark-br (473115) on Thursday September 07, 2006 @09:53AM (#16058858) Homepage
    From the job offer:
     
      The Head of the Group is Professor Stephen Hawking who is disabled and communicates using a computer system and speech synthesiser. If you were accepted for the post you would be responsible for maintaining and improving this computer system as well as other pieces of support equipment.
     
    #$recorded_msg_1 = Synth.Say("Good bye");
    $recorded_msg_1 = Synth.Say("Asta la vista, baby!");
    #$recorded_msg_2 = Synth.Say("Yes, please");
    $recorded_msg_2 = Synth.Say("Go ahead punk, make my day!");

    Oh... priceless!!!

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