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Edgy Eft Knot 2 Released 183

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the color-of-toast dept.
Klaidas writes "The Ubuntu project has released a second Knot CD — an alpha version of Edgy Eft. Notable new features include a new 2.6.17 kernel, Gnome 2.16 beta 2, Firefox 2.0b1, OpenOffice.org 2.0.3 and much more. It is availible for download on Ubuntu's image server. The final stable version is still slated for release in October 2006."
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Edgy Eft Knot 2 Released

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  • by tepples (727027) <tepples@g m a il.com> on Saturday September 02, 2006 @02:38PM (#16030276) Homepage Journal
    The Ubuntu project has released a second Knot CD

    "Nazi D"? Godwin'd before it even started.

  • by legoburner (702695) on Saturday September 02, 2006 @02:42PM (#16030298) Homepage Journal
    Ubuntu is now the leading choice for linux by quite a margin [distrowatch.com]. Us poor gentoo users languish in 10th place :(
    • by McGiraf (196030)
      And in the top 10 , 1 is Debian and 3 debian based.
    • Page rank? (Score:4, Informative)

      by Rob Simpson (533360) on Saturday September 02, 2006 @03:18PM (#16030399)
      Isn't page rank on distrowatch based on clicks to the various distros pages on that site, rather than what distro you're actually using?

      "The Page Hit Ranking statistics have attracted plenty of attention and feedback. Originally, each distribution-specific page was pure HTML with a third-party counter at the bottom to monitor interest of visitors. Later the pages were transformed into plain text files with PHP generating all the HTML code, but the original counter remained unchanged. In May 2004 the site switched from publicly viewable third-party counters to internal counters. This was prompted by a continuous abuse of the counters by a handful of undisciplined individuals who had confused DistroWatch with a voting station. The counters are no longer displayed on the individual distributions pages, but all visits (on the main site, as well as on mirrors) are logged. Only one hit per IP address per day is counted."

      ...yeah, so what it actually means is that, because it's well known and at the top of the list, Ubuntu is usually the first page clicked. This records one hit, and then no other hits are recorded for that IP for the rest of the day.

      So it doesn't really say whether it is the most commonly used distribution, merely that it gets the most clicks to its page within distrowatch.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by dvice_null (981029)
      The Linux Counter statistics claim that Ubuntu is not on the top, Debian is the number one, but then again, I'm pretty sure that people signing up for this counter are hardcore users, while Ubuntu has propably attracted a lot of new users. But it is the best stat I know, or atleast another view in this issue:
      http://counter.li.org/reports/machines.php [li.org]
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      My Gentoo-using friends assure me that as soon as they finish compiling the new list of top distros, Gentoo will be #1 again.
    • by Randseed (132501)
      Not to be a hater, but I recently started converting from Gentoo to Ubuntu. The reason is because on remote servers that I updated, about half the time the Gentoo servers would not come back up correctly. They'd silently (unless you were at the console) drop dead over some random configuration file that Portage screwed up, or worse. Ubuntu has its own problems, but those problems are almost always evident at the time of software update. In other words, with Ubuntu, the package won't even install completely
    • Not say it it will be, but lets suppose it becomes THE most popular out there by such a margin it leaves everyone else in the dust, including debian..

      Since its based on debian, what happens then?
      • Considering that Ubuntu also submits its patches back to the Debian trunk, if Debian was to fold (horrifically unlikely, but a scary thought nonetheless), I figure that it would just mean that the middleman would be removed.
    • by waferhead (557795)
      Once they have MythTv integrated, I'll give it a try again.

      It's my "Killer app I can't live without"
  • 60 days? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by khasim (1285) <brandioch.conner@gmail.com> on Saturday September 02, 2006 @02:44PM (#16030306)
    Today is the 2nd of September.
    Edgy Eft is scheduled for release "in October 2006".

    That's about 60 days maximum to go from a 2nd alpha ... to beta ... to release. Isn't that a bit optimistic? Particularly for a release that is developer driven and packed with candy.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by EvilIdler (21087)
      They did it with 6.06. Of course, there were problems that needed fixing in a swift patch,
      and some systems didn't boot (mine included!) without knowing yer stuff ;)
      So yeah, the Ubuntu developers are definitely a wee bit optimistic.
    • Re:60 days? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Ian Alexander (997430) on Saturday September 02, 2006 @02:57PM (#16030342)
      Today is the 2nd of September.
      Edgy Eft is scheduled for release "in October 2006".

      That's about 60 days maximum to go from a 2nd alpha ... to beta ... to release. Isn't that a bit optimistic? Particularly for a release that is developer driven and packed with candy.

       
      Well, feature freeze is in 5 days, so the only things coming through the pipeline in those two months are bugfixes/security patches.
       
      And even if it's not good enough, they can always fall back on "It's edgy eft! What are you complaining about?"
       
      As a general FYI, Edgy Final should be out on the 26th of October, barring disaster or pushbacks.
      • by Kjella (173770)
        Well, feature freeze is in 5 days, so the only things coming through the pipeline in those two months are bugfixes/security patches.

        He's probably not used to someone actually using alpha to mean development, beta to mean bugfixing/testing and release candidate to mean "might be final". From what I understand the Vista "RC" isn't even feature-complete, so that makes it in reality an alpha release. The only problem is that marketing would never accept that.
    • by zdzichu (100333)
      There is a release every 6 months. So 60 days is 1/3 of development time.
      • Except this release. Dapper was delayed until June to add extra polish because it was the Long Term Support version. Edgy is still planned for October anyway.
    • by rbanffy (584143)
      In my experience with 5.04, 5.10 and 6.06, they mature an incredible lot in the last few weeks. 5.10 was unusable a couple weeks before launch and 5.04 was not much better. 6.06 was a huge improvement (it became my main OS a full month before launch).

      There is no reason to expect much difference for the next release. I assume it is more or less safe to use right now or will be very soon.

      And, of course, since this is Slashdot, I must compare it with Vista pre-RC, which is also improving and is quite nice (for
  • by Gavin86 (856684) <gavin@b@lynch.gmail@com> on Saturday September 02, 2006 @03:10PM (#16030384) Journal
    Just skimming the specs [launchpad.net] of some of the new things implimented:
    • Optimized Live CD layout for faster boot
    • Thin clients local device support
    • Using dash instead of bash which makes the boot, "30s faster"
    • updated Galago
    • much faster shutdown process
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by temcat (873475)
      Using dash instead of bash which makes the boot, "30s faster"

      More like 3s faster. And dash breaks scripts that shebang to sh instead of bash (a fairly common practice). Granted, they should've use the right shebang in the first place, but these scripts worked before, and now they don't! This may seem as a minor annoyance - you can always relink sh back to bash. But the problem is, an average user won't understand why his 3rd party app suddenly stopped working with Edgy. There is no error message that would
      • by Fallingcow (213461) on Saturday September 02, 2006 @07:03PM (#16031010) Homepage
        Honestly, anyone who's installing 3rd party software on Ubuntu Edgy Eft that also happens to require a bootup shell script is going to be able to figure this out, or will already be aware of the issues and plan for it.

        I love Linux, and Ubuntu's hands-down the best distro I've ever used (best OS overall, too) but let's be realistic here. :)
    • Using dash instead of bash which makes the boot, "30s faster"

      That is seriously cool -- my VDR-machine will boot a couple of seconds before I press the power button.
  • by bogaboga (793279) on Saturday September 02, 2006 @03:37PM (#16030445)
    While the whole world seems to be very impressed with Ubuntu and its derivatives, I am still to be impressed after having tried it for about three weeks. I will however give credit where it is due. For one, package management seems to be very much improved.

    What still bothers me is the fact that in Ubuntu's GNOME file selector interface, I cannot simply paste a URL and have the program open the referenced document. It is also incredibly ugly for me...why? In KDE, this is possible but the fonts and general look are very ugly and are already starting to look ancient.

    Multimedia on the web is still a big hassle. Even for sites that offer RealPlayer streams, GNOME's RealPlayer, even if installed cannot grab the stream by default!

    The help system is still very wanting. Some have even told me it does not exist. Assumptions are made that everyone can go online and get the neccessary help. But what happens when you are on the road with no internet connection? Windows beat Linux on this.

    Before I get modded down for what some will call trolls, I will stop here but I agree that Ubuntu and Linux still have a long long way to impress folks like me.
    • by EvilIdler (21087)
      Linux definitely needs more offline help. Perhaps it was a bad decision to make -doc packages
      separated from the main binary packages. Some programs don't have proper manuals at all,
      which should be corrected. The distro creators should really have a strict system where packages
      don't make it into the main repository (stuff that ends up on the CD and DVD) unless it's fully
      documented, and has a newbie quickstart manual.

      Qt and Real both need work. I accidentally have them working in Opera because
      I install the ri
    • by mgkimsal2 (200677)
      What still bothers me is the fact that in Ubuntu's GNOME file selector interface, I cannot simply paste a URL and have the program open the referenced document. It is also incredibly ugly for me...why? In KDE, this is possible but the fonts and general look are very ugly and are already starting to look ancient.

      What's different about the 'ubuntu' GNOME file selector? Or are you just meaning that the GNOME file selector on the whole is bad? I'd agree with the second part - GNOME in general just isn't that
      • by bogaboga (793279)
        What's different about the 'ubuntu' GNOME file selector? Or are you just meaning that the GNOME file selector on the whole is bad?

        I guess I mean both. You sound to be a Linux user, so I will ask you this:

        In your opinion, is that default [GNOME] file selector the best there could be? Is the the utmost best the could be created? I guess you'd answer "no" and that's what I am talking about.

        • by mgkimsal2 (200677)
          I am a linux user. I've used Linux on and off since RH 5.2. The day to day useful things I expect a desktop to do have always come up short with GNOME. I met a GNOME developer a few years ago who was showing off their printing work. I asked if he'd ever seen the KDE printing stuff, and I got 'no, we don't look at KDE all that much'. Now, that may have been just him, and wasn't representative of most GNOME developers, but it struck me as a very ignorant thing to do, given that the code is available to i
          • Aha - it's the mozilla file upload dialog. Mozilla is apparently a GNOME app, according to GNOME proponents.


            Mozilla and derivitives use their own widgets, IIRC. Not GTK.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by dorkygeek (898295)
      What still bothers me is the fact that in Ubuntu's GNOME file selector interface, I cannot simply paste a URL and have the program open the referenced document.

      How hard is it to hit ctrl+l and then paste your path?

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Talchas (954795)
        First of all, its not very obvious. Second, while you can do that, typing a path is painful due to automatic completion of file/pathnames. I never know how many letters of a path I have to type before it completes and I am forced to start typing the next path segment. Its a really good way to stick yourself three directories down the wrong path if you type quickly. While there may well be a way to turn this off, I have no clue where it might be.
    • I've switched to Xfce and don't use GNOME anymore, but if I recall correctly you can paste a URL into the file selector by pressing Ctrl-L. It's definitely not very convenient or obvious but the feature is there. In my opinion, GNOME has become unusable because of lack of available options and the mentality that they know the way you want to do things.
      • by bogaboga (793279)
        Nope! It has consistently failed me when it comes to PDF documents. All GNOME software meant to handle PDFs can only open them locally!
    • As I mentioned here [slashdot.org], I like SUSE (the only distro that worked 100% on my laptop and has WPA-PSK) and MEPIS (which used to be Debian-based and is now Ubuntu-based, but is much nicer than either IMHO...pity about WPA-PSK not working out of the box). I prefer KDE to Gnome, especially after tweaking the fonts a bit. I don't really understand Ubuntu's popularity.
    • by jcupitt65 (68879)
      The Eft file selector has a visible location box [ximian.com].
    • by miro f (944325)

      I cannot simply paste a URL and have the program open the referenced document.

      everyone keeps saying "Ctrl-L" here. This is not an immediately obvious solution. However, gnome does have an immediately obvious solution to this problem, and one which I always do first thing after I install it.

      in the file manager, open up the preferences, select the "behaviour" tab and select "always use text-entry location bar"

      simple! contrary to popular belief, gnome actually does have preferences that are editable. The locat

    • by labratuk (204918)
      I agree that Ubuntu and Linux still have a long long way to impress folks like me.
      ...who won't be able to use something until it looks and behaves exactly like the system they had before?
  • by Kilz (741999) on Saturday September 02, 2006 @04:06PM (#16030525)
    What Ubuntu lacks is a good 64bit version.
    One of the advantages we are told of Ubuntu is that we don't have to wait on the long Debian development cycle. While that sounds good to the average i386 Ubuntu user. The amd64 Ubuntu user still has to wait on Debian. The reason I say this? In one word Multiarch.
    Multiarch was supposed to make it into Edgy. It was mentioned in the announcement by Mr Shuttleworth
    https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-announce/ 2006-April/000064.html [ubuntu.com] But it is no longer included. The reason? Ubuntu developers are waiting on Debian to develop it.
    Its like 64bit users are second class citizens. No multiarch while distro's like SuSE, Fedora, Gento and others are already multiarch. No Wine, a 64bit firefox where plugins dont work, and other 32bit programs that must be manually added along with their lib's.
    All the while eye candy is added to the 32bit version. If it wasn't for the community and people there I would have left long ago. Its sad that people with 64bit systems are told to install the 32bit version because things are missing.
    • by johansalk (818687)
      I agree. I used to use ubuntu amd64, wresteled with it for a month or two, then just couldn't be bothered anymore and switched to the i386 (k7) version that I'm running now.
    • by kestasjk (933987)
      64-bit users are second class citizens when it comes to Linux for the same reason PowerPC users are; you're the vast minority. At the moment we're still a 2-5 years from having 4GB+ RAM in a typical desktop system, and what desktop user needs 64-bit arithmatic?

      Wait a few years and 32-bit users will become second class, but until then you can't expect to have rare hardware supported just as well as commonplace hardware, especially when the changes which have to be made are non-trivial.

      Remember when get
      • by Kilz (741999)
        I don't think that 64bit will be a minority that long. I did a poll on the Ubuntu forums 36% of those that answerd ran 64bit systems. Of those that have 32bit systems, 2 times as many plan on buying 64bit systems as 32bit. More and more 64bit systems are sold every day. Both AMD and now Intel. I don't think its anywhere near the minority that ppc is because ppc was only one company. Mutiple manufacturers are making 64bit systems. That SuSE, Fedora, Gentoo, and others are already multiarch is because they se
    • by cortana (588495)
      I don't see how you can blame the distribution maker because you are shackled to proprietary software only available for i386.
      • by Kilz (741999)
        Is Wine a piece of proprietary software?
        • by cortana (588495)
          Which non-proprietary software are you using it to run?
          • by Kilz (741999)
            The work application I have to run with wine isnt open source. But I have no choice in the matter. Wine itself is open source and needed for some people to use linux full time. Since one of the goals of Ubuntu is to make it easy for Windows users to switch wine is essensial. There are also development packages that are not avaialable. 32bit linux games that havent been ported. Saying something isnt important because it isnt open source in Ubuntu is kind of backwards anyway. The distro ships/downloads with p
  • As a Windows user... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by NeuroManson (214835) on Saturday September 02, 2006 @04:38PM (#16030587) Homepage
    I welcome our Ubuntu overlords. But seriously. As far as something that can allow the average Windows user to get a taste, or even build experience in using the Linux OS, this is the best way to go.

    For one, you can use the live CD to figure out how to get Linux to do everything you want, without making major changes in your existing setup.

    With luck (and perhaps a determined developer base), by the time Vista shows up to ream all of us Windows users in the ass, Ubuntu (and subsequent imitators) will be "general public" ready, so we at least have some options.
  • Fair And Balanced? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by magicnumber (999716)
    Interesting how the Slashdot editors judge an alpha release of Ubuntu worthy of a front page story, whereas the broken-X-when-updating fiasco of a couple of weeks back was conspicuous by it's absence.

    Very interesting indeed..
  • Has anyone sucessfully installed Ubuntu on a motherboard with this chipset? AFAIK I believe this is caused quote:
    "due to the Intel P965 chipset has no more integrated IDE channel, thus the motherboard usually has an additional chip onboard for an IDE channel. In the current Gigabyte (I got one of them) and ASUS (think they have it too) this is a JMicron JMB363. Until very recently the kernel had a bug inside that made it unable to access the IDE/PATA channel. "
    I put together page here to document the is
  • Can I upgrade from my dapper to this with apt-get without having to do a reinstall? Thanks.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by CrazedWalrus (901897)
      You can upgrade just by changing all occurences of 'dapper' to 'edgy' in /etc/apt/sources.list. 'aptitude update' and 'aptitude dist-upgrade' will get you *most* of the way there.

      A word of caution, though. This didn't go 100% smoothly for me. First of all, I had to run the dist-upgrade several times, and go through synaptic's 'mark all upgrades' a couple times as well. I finally got it to install what needed installing, upgrade what needed upgrading, and remove what needed removing. It just took several ite
      • by johansalk (818687)
        Hi. I did that, and wished I had stayed with dapper. I didn't really have any problems that needed fixing, and I had gotten myself a dapper desktop that was just perfect for my needs. I guess from now on I'll just be 'conservative' in terms of upgrades. No big deal though, just a note to myself for the future. :-)
        • Heh - me too. Now that I've had more than an hour to play with it, it really is a little too development for my needs. It's mostly solid, but there are odd (and important) things broken. For instance, Open Office crashes when I try to save a document. Of all things, I figured they'd have the basics working, at least. Ah well, the price to pay for being adventuresome! :) I'll probably spend some time downgrading in the near future, though I'm hopeful that they'll fix the bugs that affect me before I get aro
  • Wouldn't the Gnome version be Gnot?

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