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Windows Vista RC1 Complete 292

Posted by Zonk
from the inching-ever-closer dept.
alienfluid writes to mention that RC1 of Windows Vista is now complete. This 'nearly complete' version of the operating system is already available to beta testers, and will be available to everyone else soon. From the article: "You'll notice a lot of improvements since Beta 2. We've made some UI adjustments, added more device drivers, and enhanced performance. We're not done yet, however -- quality will continue to improve. We'll keep plugging away on application compatibility, as well as fit and finish, until RTM. If you are an ISV, RC1 is the build you should use for certifying your application."
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Windows Vista RC1 Complete

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  • by LiquidCoooled (634315) on Friday September 01, 2006 @05:48PM (#16027170) Homepage Journal
    DOOOoooooo DEEEEeeeee DAAAAaaaa Ting

    Oh Crap, sorry forgot to turn the volume down.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Your sound is working, which is good to know.

      It is now safe to use your computer.
  • by Tackhead (54550) on Friday September 01, 2006 @05:49PM (#16027176)
    > Windows Vista is going to touch hundreds of millions of lives all around the world.

    "Bad touch! Bad touch!"

    • by Who235 (959706) <secretagentx9.cia@com> on Friday September 01, 2006 @05:57PM (#16027209)
      Trackhead, point out on the doll where Vista touched you. . .
      • by twitter (104583) on Friday September 01, 2006 @06:14PM (#16027291) Homepage Journal

        Trackhead, point out on the doll where Vista touched you. . .

        In the wallet, of course. M$ is going to waste $6.2 billion promoting what's looking more and more like XP SP3, super digital restriction. While I won't directly pay for that, many will. Schools, government and everyone not bright enough to use free software will pay. They will pass that cost along as taxes and higher prices. As Steve Baller likes to say, the upfront cost of software are just the beginning and all of the tremendous inefficiencies of Windoze will also be passed along in higher prices and poorer service. I don't even want to think of the costs to the economy that comes from Microsoft's inability to design a network safe OS are. All of the above easily adds up to multiples of M$'s annual net revenue.

        • From the summary:

          We'll keep plugging away on application compatibility

          Isn't it touching how loyal the Vista Dev Team is to Duke Nukem Forever? Real Soon Now, Vista will be ready for release! I mean, they even have a Release Candidate out!
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by jb.hl.com (782137)
          In the wallet, of course. M$ is going to waste $6.2 billion promoting what's looking more and more like XP SP3, super digital restriction.

          Three things:

          1) If Microsoft didn't promote their flagship product, they would be fucking cretins of the first degree. You seem to think that just because you say so, they should just give up, if not actively say "Don't use Windows".
          2) MS' operating profit is about 12.6 billion dollars. They're not going to spend almost half of their operating profit on promoting Vista.
          3)
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            $44billion? Cite your references please.

            Not my reference, but it is correct. Here [yahoo.com] is there last annual report. Right at the top is thier fiscal year 2006 revenue is 44,282 (in millions) so over 44 billion.
            • by jb.hl.com (782137)
              I didn't mean their annual revenue, which I already knew. I was asking twitter to back up his assertion that Microsoft has cost the US economy many times their annual revenue. Backing up assertions ain't one of twitter's strong points :)
              • by jb.hl.com (782137)
                In fact now I think about it it, he says that Microsoft has cost the US multiples of their net revenue. Which is obvious; it's net revenue, i.e. their profit (about 12 billion according to Wikipedia). Given how much Microsoft software the US uses, it stands to reason that they would spend at least twice that...so basically, twitter is correct, but it's a specious and misleading claim.
          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            Those features are all only new to Windows. Most of these "New Features" that bill wants money for are so that his OS will actually work with established standards, and it will replicate tried and tested methods of computer use. Vista's features also seem rather similar to the features that have been in OSX for years. Also, given that microsoft tries to keep other people's software from being replaced with a version they've created, most of these features will probably be crippled and almost useless compare
          • by A beautiful mind (821714) on Saturday September 02, 2006 @02:54AM (#16028811)
            I would like you to pay close attention to this page. Special attention should be paid to what a long page it is, and the number of notes at the bottom confirming it all.
            On a page titled "Features new to Windows Vista", there are lots of things like: "Windows Vista will also use IFilters that are used today by Windows Desktop Search. The IFilter interface can be implemented by software makers so that files created by their applications can be better integrated with search and indexing programs.".

            Well, technically they would be "new" to Windows Vista, if Vista were new, but since they DID NOT start from scratch, then I sadly have to conclude that the length of that page is nowhere near indicative of the number of features found in Vista. The wiki article is basically fluffed up with explanations, comparisons, explanations of comparisons and old stuff (from WinXP and before). What's more, the article seems to concentrate on Vista from a visual POV, so it lists every little graphical detail of everything ("Other features include check boxes for selecting multiple files. When renaming a file, Explorer only highlights the filename without selecting the extension.", etc.).

            All in all, if you take out the fluff, the amount of "new features" shrink drastically. That's for 6 years of work.
      • Who is Trackhead? [grin]
  • Release Candidate? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by xazeru (671933) on Friday September 01, 2006 @05:50PM (#16027181)
    If Microsoft knows that there is more work to do, why call it a release candidate?
    • by Opportunist (166417) on Friday September 01, 2006 @05:55PM (#16027203)
      Right, usually they call something like this "final"
      • Could be worst... (Score:5, Interesting)

        by creimer (824291) on Friday September 01, 2006 @06:00PM (#16027226) Homepage
        On several occasions at Atari, a producer would try to slip in an Alpha-Beta-GoldRelease-Omega build candidate to get their performance bonus even though the title was four months behind schedule. Go figure.
        • Golden Master 2 (Score:4, Informative)

          by lullabud (679893) on Friday September 01, 2006 @08:59PM (#16028017) Homepage
          That reminds me of when I was working at Actiontec and I'd be working on authoring a hybrid "Gold Master" release to go off to the duplicator for 100,000 copies, and then marketing would come down the hall and have some text changes and image changes 5 minutes before the FedEx guy was going to show up, 60 minutes before FedEx closed. I'd then have to manually insert these files (then rework CVS from the changes they had me put into the tree I had checked out), and this was "Golden Master R2". So, somebody would literally be waiting with a car ready to speed off to the nearest FedEx center to hand-deliver the CD to them for shipping. Then Marketing would come back and say "SHIT! We forgot something blatantly obvious that was decided 30 minutes ago between me and another clueless top-dog suits!! I'd have to author hybrid CD Golden Master R3 and upload the ISO to them, and they'd be finished downloading it before they even received Golden Master R2 from over-night FedEx. But an ISO wasn't enough, they also needed 5 copies of Golden Master R3 over-nighted too. Then the project would be put on hold for 2 months because of a hardware issue, which would give everybody time to slip in more fixes for the "New Golden Master", and the cycle would repeat. I tried to explain the principle of the release canidate, but they wouldn't hear it. Snafu, I tell you. I sure don't miss those days.
    • by Kesch (943326) on Friday September 01, 2006 @05:59PM (#16027219)
      Most of the work left is reclassifying all the bug reports as "features."
    • by Mark_in_Brazil (537925) on Friday September 01, 2006 @06:35PM (#16027397)
      Exactly.

      alienfluid writes to mention that RC1 of Windows Vista is now complete. This 'nearly complete' version of the operating system is already available to beta testers, and will be available to everyone else soon.
      From the article:
      "You'll notice a lot of improvements since Beta 2. We've made some UI adjustments, added more device drivers, and enhanced performance. We're not done yet, however -- quality will continue to improve. We'll keep plugging away on application compatibility, as well as fit and finish, until RTM. If you are an ISV, RC1 is the build you should use for certifying your application."

      "You keep using those words. I do not think they mean what you think they mean."
    • by mr_zorg (259994)
      JERRY: I don't understand, I need a release candidate, do you have a release candidate?
      MICROSOFT: Yes, we do, unfortunately we ran out of time to finish it.
      JERRY: But release candidate means you're nearly ready to ship. That's why you have a release candidate.
      MICROSOFT: I know why we have release candidates.
      JERRY: I don't think you do. If you did, you'd done barring critical bug fixes. See, you know how to call something a release candidate, you just don't know how to *release* the candidate and that's real
  • Freeware? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) on Friday September 01, 2006 @05:51PM (#16027185)

    This 'nearly complete' version of the operating system is already available to beta testers, and will be available to everyone else soon.

    They're making a release candidate available to everyone, or was this just the submitter being imprecise?

    • Beta 2 is available to everyone...

      • Re:Freeware? (Score:5, Informative)

        by 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) on Friday September 01, 2006 @06:06PM (#16027258)

        Beta 2 is available to everyone...

        From microsoft.com: "Thank you for your interest in Windows Vista. The Customer Preview Program is now closed. We have reached our program capacity and no new orders are being accepted. We apologize for any inconvenience."

        It looks like a limited number of beta testers for the beta and for the RC, not "everyone."

        • by eggoeater (704775) on Friday September 01, 2006 @06:31PM (#16027371) Journal

          I don't think you're looking at the correct web site [thepiratebay.org].

        • by Tim Browse (9263)
          I managed to get a copy of Beta 2 before they closed the preview. You're not missing much.
        • by westlake (615356)
          It looks like a limited number of beta testers for the beta and for the RC, not "everyone."

          From the Vista Team Blog:

          # re: It's Official: Windows Vista RC1 Is Complete
          Friday, September 01, 2006 2:59 PM by nwhite
          Hey everybody: just wanted to clarify that the TechBeta/TAP site is not open to the public, so RC1 is not currently available to you if you're not part of one of those programs.

          **However,** we're planning to make RC1 available to MSDN and TechNet subscribers next week, and to
          the general publ

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by ocelotbob (173602)
      MS has time-limited versions of a lot of their software, including 2003 server and Office. In fact, XP RC-1 had a similar open beta program. Fill out a form, and they send ya a CD for free. I think I still have my copy somewhere.
  • RC? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by dustball23 (309393) on Friday September 01, 2006 @05:53PM (#16027193)
    How can something "nearly complete" be a candidate for release? Unless they are considering releasing THAT BUILD, it's not a true RC.
    • Re:RC? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Aadain2001 (684036) on Friday September 01, 2006 @06:01PM (#16027231) Journal
      It's simply a business descision. They are waaaaaaaaaaaay behind and have OEMs and major developers on their backs for something they can use to develope for/validate against. Vista will never be "done". Five years from now we'll still be "finishing" the OS with bug patches and feature creep. I think the article simple ment that what was left was fine-tuning of small features, insuring as much "correct" behavior as possible, and re-compiling without debug code.
      • by cnettel (836611)
        And this is certainly nothing new, the Windows 2000 RCs started coming out earlier than this back in 1999, with the OS RTMed in late December, and official release in February 2000.
    • by creimer (824291)
      They did release a pre-RC1 build earlier this week. I'll be installing my copy over the weekend.
    • by hhr (909621)
      MSFT says it's a release candidate, because they will support it in production. If a MSFT beta toasts your box, then you are SOL. But, if an MSFT RC toasts your box, their customer support can get involved.
    • Software isnt 'complete' until its retired i guess. Until then, its hit with patches, bug fixes, etc.. so 'production' really isnt 'complete', its just not in beta anymore.
  • Too late (Score:5, Funny)

    by ccmay (116316) on Friday September 01, 2006 @05:57PM (#16027210)
    I was talking to a half dozen of my partners yesterday. Four of us already had a MacBook, and the other three were planning to buy one.

    Every one of us was a former Windows user, and had a copy of Windows 2000 or XP which they planned to run under Parallels for connectivity to our company system, but not one of them cared a fig for Vista, and nobody intended to run any kind of Windows natively with BootCamp.

    I predict this will be Microsoft's biggest flop ever. You heard it here first.

    -ccm

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Stormwatch (703920)
      As much as I'm rooting for that, I doubt it'll flop as bad as Windows Me.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by jmauro (32523)
        Sadly Windows Me cannot hold a candle to the flop that was Microsoft Bob [wikipedia.org]
        • How is the parent off-topic? He was making an on-topic reply to the grandparent, who was making an on-topic reply to the great-grandparent.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by mrbcs (737902)
        We can always hope! Windows Mistake Edition at least would sort of run on existing computers. Seen the specs for this? In this day and age? I think this one is going to tank big time and they don't have another Win2k to bail them out.

        So what do you think of the subscription model now?

        • ...Here, here is our best hope for Microsoft. They are combining the strengths of Windows CE from their impressive mobile line, Windows ME, and of course, the reliability of the Windows NT kernel...

          GIF Product Brochure [geocities.com]
        • by baadger (764884)
          Hard drive space aside, i've found Vista x64 build 5536 to perform just about as well as XP. <opinion>Shame about the underwhelming UI and it's extreme level of suck though. </opinion>
        • The subscription model is in tatters.

          If you recall, it was around this time a couple of years ago that we started hearing about the subscription model and Software Assurance. This was supposed to make life easier for everyone by giving Microsoft a continuous stream of money and receiving from them a continuous stream of the latest and greatest. But Vista, which was promised within the contract period of software assurance, is still months away, and corporations have basically thrown away money for no upgr
      • Considering that it's mandatory to have Vista to take advantage of DX10, and considering that DX has become a de facto standard in the gaming industry, lots of people are going to eventually be forced to port over to Vista.

        Right?
        • Re:Too late (Score:5, Insightful)

          by 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) on Friday September 01, 2006 @06:29PM (#16027362)

          Considering that it's mandatory to have Vista to take advantage of DX10, and considering that DX has become a de facto standard in the gaming industry, lots of people are going to eventually be forced to port over to Vista.

          I suspect there will be a lot of developers targeting DirectX 9 for many years to come, since the number of Vista machines will be so much lower than the number of Vista+XP+Me+2K machines. In any case, hopefully some of the developers wise up and move to OpenGL where they don't have to worry about MS refusing to support their graphics API improvements. OpenGL 2.0 will work on all of the above plus the PS2 and PS3 and OS X and Linux.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by nbannerman (974715)
      My bread and butter in daily life is Network Management (although some idiot gave me the job title of Director of ICT Strategy as well...), but you make an interesting point. I've moving towards to a non-Windows enviroment for personal use, and probably a Linux-based environment for work use.

      But my college uses Microsoft. XP / Offce are the basics of what I support / install / repair.

      When Vista arrives, it is inevitable that I'll be rolling it out college wide.

      And big business? Well, they'll be doi
      • And big business? Well, they'll be doing the same. A lot of the functionality we've been seeing plugged into Vista (not this Glass and New Improved Solitaire! rubbish) has been directed towards business.

        After seeing what a major corporation went through to move from Win2K to XP (which was by far a less sweeping upgrade than what Vista seems to be), I can't imagine that big business will be migrating to Vista all so quickly. I can only imagine how many VB6 apps will have problems in Vista. From everythin

      • Vista will not flop. It'll be pre-installed of every new machine come February 2007; the Microsoft Tax ensures a healthy install base. As for business, I think they'll transition mid-2007, at the latest, when we see the first service pack.

        Many businesses will not be moving to Vista for a while still. Pre-installation means nothing for businesses. Businesses will keep requestiong XP (or in many cases, Win2000) from their vendor. It's not a big deal to do that, because most hardware vendors expect that

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by lawpoop (604919)
      No, I don't think so. There's no way it can surpass the unheralded failure of Windows ME.

      Mom and Pop User will continue to buy generic PCs because of the cost, and because that's what they know. Come November or December, you won't be able to find a PC that doesn't have Vista on it. It will be a smashing success, just because it will be on 90% of the computers sold. It's called a monopoly. Even if techies and columnists say it's not worth the upgrade, people won't care. They got used to an underperforming
    • by RonnyJ (651856)
      I predict this will be Microsoft's biggest flop ever.

      Windows ME is Microsoft's biggest flop so far IMHO, and from my experiences from using the Pre-RC1 build, there's no way that Vista will come close to rivaling that. Beta 2 may have been disappointing, but Pre-RC1 has had a lot of positive feedback.

    • by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Friday September 01, 2006 @10:21PM (#16028290)
      When Vista releases I'll be putting it on my computer at work. Might even stick the RC on there, we'll see. After I've validated all our apps, and had sufficient time I feel it's ready (month or two probably) I'll roll it out to the first of our labs. The rest will follow in a couple months. I expect to have Vista on 200 or so lab machines fairly soon after it's release.

      I realise that you may think you and 6 friends are a statistically significant sample, but you actually aren't.

      My prediction on Vista is let's wait and see. Seems ot me most of those predicting it'll flop are doing so because they WANT it to flop, not because they've any real valid reason to believe it will.

      Despite your perception, it does have many things going for it. One is simply that OEMs are going to switch and start shipping it. However these is legit reasons for people to be excited. Game devs are just going bonkers over DX10. Epic has already declared that while UT2007 will run just fine on DX9, you'll need 10 for all the features to work.

      So ask yourself: Are your predicting failure because you have a real reason, or because you hate MS?
      • by smash (1351)
        My prediction on Vista is let's wait and see.

        That's not a prediction, that's called sitting on the fence, or not having the balls to make a call :D

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by CrackedButter (646746)
        You bastard, you know you're going against the slashdot group think with your post, you should be trying to install Unbuntu or Fedora or be buying a couple of Macs.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 01, 2006 @05:58PM (#16027214)
    It's been nearly two weeks [google.com] since a security patch has been released for Vista Beta. I think we have a winner. A few weeks of clear sailing and this sucker's ready for Gold. I predict all will be quiet on the security front until the Holiday season, when all our high-end fancy new computers come online with nice, shiny new Vistas.

    And when I say "our" computers I trust you know exactly what I mean.
  • Oops (Score:5, Informative)

    by PhrostyMcByte (589271) <phrosty@gmail.com> on Friday September 01, 2006 @06:05PM (#16027250) Homepage
    And it still has the ridiculus mandatory driver signing, forcing freeware/open source developers to shell out $500 for a certificate if they want to make drivers that work on x64. All for their precious trusted computing. Wouldn't want those evil x64 criminals installing drivers to rip hd-dvds would they?
    • by canuck57 (662392)

      ...freeware/open source developers to shell out $500 for a certificate...

      If you can't fix the OS, then charge for certs for it.

      It is the next part of MS EEE, MS EEEE. Embrace, extend, exterminate and then extort. Wait until they apply this stuff to music and video encrypting users files...

      All this cert stuff when a checksum or PGP signature would have done it. But no money in that.

      Linux - Live Free Of DRM

    • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

      by SilentChris (452960)
      So far, I haven't had a single signed device driver crash my 2000/XP/2003 boxes. On the other hand, I've had many MANY unsigned drivers blue screen each OS to hell. If a developer needs to spend $500, which also means MS runs it through their hardware quality labs and ensure the stupid thing actually works, I'm all for it.

      Besides, how many "freeware/open source" driver developers are out there for Windows?
      • by LLuthor (909583)
        This will mean an end to things like freeware/open drivers for virtual devices like virtual DVD drives (playing games without carrying CDs around), virtual sound cards (ripping audio from programs that try to prevent it), virtual graphics card drivers (using your laptop as a second or third monitor), virtual network cards (bridged networking with open source tools like qemu), etc.

        Not to mention legitimate freeware projects like kqemu, the ext2fs windows driver, and so on.

        The possibilities afforded by being
      • by smash (1351)
        I haven't had a single *un-signed* driver crash my machine in the last 6 years.

        Buy quality hardware with decent drivers, don't go for "beta" driver releases, and you're generally fine anyway.

        I'd like the option to run *UN* signed drivers thanks - I know better than Microsoft what my needs/priorities are.

  • by Anonymous Coward
    "This 'nearly complete' version of the operating system...will be available to everyone else soon."

    At Microsoft, this can only mean one thing:
    "Ship it!!!!"
  • translation (Score:3, Insightful)

    by MarsDude (74832) on Friday September 01, 2006 @06:24PM (#16027335) Homepage
    "We'll keep plugging away on application compatibility"

    Read: We're constructing dirty hacks into our newly written clean code so we don't upset our partners. This of course will cause the same side effects as with our previous versions, but hey... it looks better !!!!
    • If only they would SandBox such hacks so that companies that don't need them could turn them off and have a nice clean OS.....
  • P.R. Terminology (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Detritus (11846) on Friday September 01, 2006 @06:49PM (#16027467) Homepage
    Where I've worked, what Microsoft is calling a "beta" or "release candidate" would be considered an alpha release. Beta releases are supposed to be feature complete, but in need of testing and debugging.
  • As a Microsoft partner for IPv6 Jumpstart, we installed Vista RC1 on multiple machines this morning. Vista is Microsoft's "IPv6 Optimized" desktop system while XP is "IPv6 Capable" of limited operations. We immediately noticed one important change. IE doesn't crash every 2 minutes! Previously, we had to install Firefox administer to run our IP surveillance cameras, security system, and building automation sensor system because the java web interface constantly crashed the browser in Vista Beta 1 and 2.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by MooUK (905450)
      You're installing an unfinished, unsupported OS on your security systems?

      This doesn't sound like an amazing idea to me.
      • by EvanED (569694)
        Um, did you notice the "the java web interface" phrase?

        This right off the bat means that he was probably on ANOTHER computer from which he could administer them, not that the systems themselves were on it.
  • Isn't a release candidate supposed to be the hey, this is what we plan to release, tell us how it works, not we're not done yet, we are still adding features.
  • Beta III (Score:3, Interesting)

    by BSonline (989394) on Friday September 01, 2006 @08:15PM (#16027847) Homepage Journal
    Actually, if you read the pages while you're going to download the ISO, it's not quite RC yet. They specifically call it pre RC, which is just a way of saying "This is still beta, but we don't want to say that, we need to restore some faith, so this is the almost RC version. Thank you."

    The sadness does not hide the truth.
  • by Freed (2178) on Friday September 01, 2006 @09:20PM (#16028093)
    Excerpt from running "dict vista":

    In the groves of their academy, at the end of every
    vista, you see nothing but the gallows. --Burke.
    [1913 Webster]

    The shattered tower which now forms a vista from his
    window. --Sir W. Scott.
    [1913 Webster]

    Rather fitting images for something screwing its users with WGA, DRM, etc.
  • by istartedi (132515) on Friday September 01, 2006 @09:36PM (#16028145) Journal

    Pull your heads out of your asses and sell OS-X for generic PCs. You could clean up at $300/copy. Virtually no marginal cost. It'll replace the iPod revenues you're losing because everyone who wants one, has one. But nooOOOooo. You're so hell bent on emulating the losing business model followed by Sun. Oh, please... what do we have to do? Fly out there, slap you in the face and put smelling salts under your noses? The gorilla has eaten a bad bannanna. He's down. He won't stay down forever. You'll look back on this, and you'll never forgive yourselves for not having kicked him while he's down, cuz you know he's gonna get back up.

The IQ of the group is the lowest IQ of a member of the group divided by the number of people in the group.

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