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Samsung Breaks the 4G Barrier 88

Posted by Zonk
from the ready-for-augmented-reality dept.
eastbayted writes "Samsung shifted wireless networking into a higher gear yesterday, demonstrating for the first time in public the power of it WiBro (Wireless Broadband) 4G technology. The company had two 4G demonstrations. A mobile stunt entailed providing delegates on a specially designed bus with a live broadcast of the forum, Internet access, and video on demand, all simultaneously at speeds of 100Mbps. Inside the forum venue, Samsung showed off its 1Gbps 4G service with 32 HD channel broadcast downloads, Internet access, and video telephony. The downside for users craving that kind of speed: WiBro won't be out until 2010, though Sprint has a 4G WiMax service in the works for later this year. The downstream speeds will be 2Mbps to 4Mbps, which seem downright sluggish — compared to WiBro."
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Samsung Breaks the 4G Barrier

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  • I prefer... (Score:5, Funny)

    by Slider451 (514881) <slider451@@@hotmail...com> on Friday September 01, 2006 @03:55PM (#16026829)
    The WiMansierre
  • The entertainment industry will have to come up with a new business model, such as product placement instead of ad space due to the speed and the storage levels on the horizon. It's actually old school. Texaco theater might make a come back. Or, like ESPN does with Soccer games, there might be split screen ads during credits, little product logos in the corner, etc. Crack may kill, but speed is going to bring death to modern advertising.
  • wibro is not sluggish compared with wimax, the demo probably used like 200mhz of spectrum to get 100Mbit, whereas the 2-4Mbit quoted for wimax is using a 5 or 7Mhz channel.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by vstanescu (522393)
      This is an insightful comment modded down by people who know nothing about Wimax. In EU/US licenses for Wimax are for 3.5-7Mhz usually. In Korea they allowed usage of huge chunks of the spectrum for this, and that's why they got that impressive bandwidth. It would be nice for us to have the same, but the fight for spectrum is harder here than there.
  • by robla (4860) * on Friday September 01, 2006 @04:04PM (#16026910) Homepage Journal
    What does "breaking the 4G barrier" mean? The Samsung demo looks cool enough, but saying that they "broke the 4G barrier" means about as much as "this one goes to eleven". The "4G" moniker isn't well defined enough to use as a litmus test of anything other than "hey, if you thought that 3G was overhyped and overpriced, well, just wait until you see this!"
  • by Kesch (943326) on Friday September 01, 2006 @04:04PM (#16026911)
    A mobile stunt entailed providing delegates on a specially designed bus with a live broadcast of the forum, Internet access, and video on demand, all simultaneously at speeds of 100Mbps.


    See! The Internet's not a truck that you just dump stuff on. It's actually a bus.
  • 60kmph?!?!? On a train, and you guys are impressed with some bandwidth increases. :)
    • by kalirion (728907)
      Um, what train? And what's so impressive about a train going 37 mph?
      • by grahamsz (150076)
        You've obviously never been on an american train, some really do go slowly enough than an in-shape vagrant could jump onto them.

        Certainly nothing like the better european or japanese train networks.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by wguy00 (985922)
      But what if another train leaves Boston going the same speed?
  • by Anubis350 (772791) on Friday September 01, 2006 @04:08PM (#16026938)
    Offtopic perhaps, but it seems these days Samsung releases new technologies/products at a really fast pace. Not only that, their products tend to upper-middle of the pack (good feature sets, reasonably reliable, priced a bit higher than some of the competition but worth it). Seems to me like Samsung is becoming the new Sony... Discuss :-P
    • This is quite offtopic. But, I have to agree. When I am looking at products, Samsung is always there and they are generally very good.

      Such as this monitor I am using right now. It's the Samsung Syncmaster 940BW [samsung.com]. I've had no problems with it... other than my video card is too old and can't push 1440x900. :-P
    • by dreamlax (981973)

      Samsung, Panasonic, Toshiba... they probably all have bigger R&D departments. Sony hasn't done much recently, compared to all the other brands. In fact, the last Sony product I bought was a PS2. Their first Bravia LCDs were shit (comparing to Panasonic's G8 Viera LCDs), their audio products aren't much better than other brands (except they usually play ATRAC as well as MP3s, but big deal!), their DVD players do everything the cheaper ones do, their DVD recorders do everything the other ones do (sometime

    • by value_added (719364) on Friday September 01, 2006 @04:36PM (#16027112)
      Offtopic perhaps, but it seems these days Samsung releases new technologies/products at a really fast pace. Not only that, their products tend to upper-middle of the pack (good feature sets, reasonably reliable, priced a bit higher than some of the competition but worth it).

      I remember when Samsung was a crummy Korean electronics company selling crummy Korean electronics. At the time, I was a token Caucasian working in a similarly crummy Korean company that made equally crummy products. I thought to myself, "No way. These guys aren't Japanese. No one will ever rival the Japanese."

      Shame on me. Especially considering the fact that I was around when Sony, a Japanese company no one had ever heard of, decided to try and sell these tiny crappy transistor radios in the US. The rest, as they say, is history.

      Yeah, I'd agree. Samsung does seem to come out with a lot of new products. Any one of them would be a worthwhile purchase, especially given the fact their products tend to also be less expensive than their competitors.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Dahamma (304068)
      Samsung isn't the new Sony - they have far surpassed whatever ever Sony was by now!

      I just walked around their booth (hah! ok, their "massive quadrant of the show floor") at CES 2006 and just shook my head in amazement. They are the largest flash manufacturer (as well as having a large share of the phones, mp3 players, cameras, flash cards, etc that use it), they are the largest LCD panel manufacturer AND one of the larger plasma panel manufacturers (why worry about competition? Just sell them both!) meani
      • by dwandy (907337)
        ...and they seem to get tech - and what might make the geek take notice.
        They were one of few majors I could find that made an MP3 player that played OGG format files...
    • by zakath (180357)
      Could it be because Samsung doesn't have a content arm to come up with ass-tastic ways to hobble their tech like Sony does?
    • by Chonine (840828)
      The new Sony?

      When do they start trying to screw me?
  • Samsung shifted wireless networking into a higher gear yesterday, demonstrating for the first time in public the power of it WiBro (Wireless Broadband) 4G technology

    Why not just use roman numerals, and make it a regular sequel? Then they could just call it WiII.
    • Samsung shifted wireless networking into a higher gear yesterday, demonstrating for the first time in public the power of it WiBro (Wireless Broadband) 4G technology

      Why not just use roman numerals, and make it a regular sequel? Then they could just call it WiII.


      I claim prior art. All your patents are belong to Will.
  • Then increasing the wireless transmission rate any higher is kind of pointless, isn't it?

    This would only be useful in places with very wide bandwidth trunk pipes.
    • Then increasing the wireless transmission rate any higher is kind of pointless, isn't it? No, it could have some (eventual) uses. When you start looking at the all-in-one packaging that is becoming more common, it would allow better usage of similar packages for companies. (Or even multi-residential apartments and such) It's also another brick in the super-network home setup - route your TV, internet, phone, etc. through one point. -- Just My Opinion/Could Be Wrong
  • WiBro? (Score:1, Redundant)

    by SkyWalk423 (661752)
    I like "WiManzier" better, personally.
  • Who the.. (Score:2, Insightful)

    by ADRA (37398)
    f**k cares when it costs ass loads just to opt into this rediculously expensive market. I don't even see my fellow nerds using '3g' technologies of today since telocs keep the prices outragously high (at least where I live).

    The next slashdot poll should be
    My cell phone supports
    1. Analog
    2. 2g
    3. 3g
    4. Cowboynealg
    5. I don't have a cell phone you insensitive clod!
    • by Erwos (553607)
      Ridiculously high? I pay $15 for unlimited[1] 3G internet access for my phone. Maybe it's time you switched providers.

      -Erwos

      [1] You know what I mean.
    • My current (cheap) contract has 40MB a month of 3G data included. This is enough for the rare occasions when I am away from a WiFi connection (usually on a train or visiting parents). I've had this for almost a year, and I believe I can upgrade to unlimited data for about the same price now, if I 'phone them up and tell them I want to.
  • by Speare (84249)

    Will Wii want WiBro or will WiBro be brought to Wipro? Why will WiBro beat WiFi finally, a feat for we wee ones? Fie!

  • Still waiting.... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by gamer4Life (803857) on Friday September 01, 2006 @04:16PM (#16026996)
    I'm still waiting for 3G or GPRS to be affordable...nevermind 4G. Perhaps the carriers will lower the prices for 3G or GPRS when 4G comes out... or maybe not.
    • I'm still waiting for 3G or GPRS to be affordable

      Unlimited GPRS web and e-mail is under $6/month with T-Mobile. I have unlimited GPRS (no restricted ports) for $15/month through T-Mobile, and I can roam on 3G networks in Europe and Asia, as well (there is a data fee, but I don't remember how much it is, but it was very reasonable. Something like 1 cent per kilobyte).

      How much more affordable do you want?
  • Who's got a phased array radio network routing TCP/IP to mobile devices? Phased arrays offer huge bandwidth and little penalty for fast moving endpoints.
    • I have one. No, you can't see it.
    • by Animats (122034)

      Plus, with some extra software upgrades, you can detect and track stealthed aircraft.

      • by Doc Ruby (173196)
        Interesting. Like what kind of SW?
      • by Animats (122034)

        There's been some interest in using cell sites as bistatic radars. Stealth aircraft work by having very low reflectance on a direct line back to the source, so if the radar transmitter and receiver are in the same location, there's almost no reflection. But if the transmitter and receiver are in different locations, stealth geometry has little effect. A "bistatic radar" is such a radar.

        So the concept is to have multiple emitters and receivers, all tightly coordinated. That's to some extent what a cell

  • by creimer (824291) on Friday September 01, 2006 @04:19PM (#16027023) Homepage
    The term "WiBro" has been renamed to "WiPer" to maintain a gender-netural terminology. The "WiMe" and "WiNot" camps are filing suit for being excluded from this group. A spokesperson for the White House states that the president is staying the course with the "WiCare" group.
  • With the slow adoption of 3G, I doubt 4G will take off any time soon.
    • If it's sufficiently better than 3G then we might just leapfrog it.

      The typical 2Mbps 3G data connection doesn't appeal to me that much, i can find that sort of speed in almost any coffeeshop in the country. However a gigabit speed connection would change everything. I could drop my home phones, broadband and existing cell service to move to 4G, so even if it turns out expensive it'd be ok.

  • So "G" is a measurement? I always thought 1G, 2G and 3G were labels applied to generations. And all you have to do to have "4G" is produce a product sufficiently different from previous generations.
  • from another planet?
  • Sprint charges an arm and a leg for their shoddy wireless-internet access right now, and requires expensive PCMCIA cards or PDA-phones and long contracts to sign up for anything past ringtone downloads. Any new service will be equally as bullshit, with ringtones and limited web access on the phones, but for full internet you'll need to pay a high premium and buy special expensive hardware.

    I hate wireless carriers, and I don't believe a word they say until it's a reality.
  • I thought that 3G was short for third-generation. Boy, it sure is good that somebody's breaking that fourth-generation barrier!
  • Weeeeeeeeeeee.
  • There is wibro tech deployed in philippines. Country is impovirished yet they have access to latest tech.
    North america is again, lags behind everybody. Time to pack bags and move elsewhere. :) thanks to the internet.
    2c
  • I was amused to hear Leo Laporte mention Samsung as "one of those Japanese companies" on Call for Help the other day. In the first place, the show pre-screens all its webcam callers, you have to email them with your question and they'll maybe call you back. This is nice for the show, as it provides tons of time for them to do web research and broadcast it.
  • Actually, WiBro was demonstrated [smartmobs.com] during last winter olympic games in Turin.
  • Why bro?
  • The Shannon Limit [wikipedia.org] shows that you can get datarates up to B*log2(1+(S/N)), where B is (spectrum) bandwidth, S is singal level, and N is noise level.

    If the SNR is very high and so is the bandwitdth, you can transmit a lot of data. We could already do that with things like optical and electrical cables, microwave links, etc.

    Some features of a wireless link can help you improve SNR. For instance, you can use things like rake receivers [wikipedia.org] to reduce multipath interference. But you're never going to do all tha

  • Now I can download my porn faster!

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