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Zelda on the Wii To Include Sword Swinging 236

Posted by Zonk
from the ka-ching dept.
IGN has the news that the Wii version of Twilight Princess has been retooled to allow you to swing Link's sword. The bow and arrow has been moved to the 'B' button, alleviating one of the big complaints hands-on users had at E3. From the article: "Miyamoto felt that that shooting the arrow with the D-pad was too difficult, and the B button allows for quicker and easier shooting. It's unclear if the game will require the new control scheme or if players will be able to chose between different methods of control. Nintendo Dream closed off by asking Miyamoto to name the version of Zelda he personally prefers. The master game maker said that he'd play the Wii version, but added that both versions will be fun."
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Zelda on the Wii To Include Sword Swinging

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  • by shadwwulf (145057) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @12:47PM (#15956402) Homepage
    that you'll have to spin in your chair to do the higher level spin attack?

    Start stocking up on the Dramamine!
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Kagura (843695)
      This is just the less-confusing of two related Zelda announcements, the other being that the GameCube version will also, somehow, include sword-swinging.

      In other news, GC controller manufacturers' stock prices inexplicably rose 5000%. More news at 10.
  • Why wouldn't it? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by stevencbrown (238995) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @12:48PM (#15956406) Homepage Journal
    I can't believe there was ever a stage where the wiimote wasn't a sword swing!!

    what's the point of coming up with a unique control system, then just using it like a conventional controller?

    Does Red Steel not have something pretty weak too - i.e. you swing the wiimote, but the sword on screen swings in a standard way, regardless of how you actually swung the remote?

    • I can't believe there was ever a stage where the wiimote wasn't a sword swing!!

      Actually, I believe (someone has a link?) that the issue wasn't whether Zelda would have you swinging the Wiimote as a sword, but to what exent you would do so. They originally wanted all swinging to be done through the Wiimote, but then found that it tires you too quickly, so they just constrained it to "special" sorts of attacks, or something like that.
      • by WillAffleckUW (858324) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @03:25PM (#15957663) Homepage Journal
        They originally wanted all swinging to be done through the Wiimote, but then found that it tires you too quickly, so they just constrained it to "special" sorts of attacks, or something like that.

        Well, real swords do that. They're heavy. Your wrist and your arm and your shoulder get tired.

        Personally, I rather look forward to more realistic swordplay. I've had it with teeny young girls swinging giant two-handed swords in glowing arcs as they attack, or throwing halberds (those things are heavy) as if they were toothpicks.

        I would hope you can choose to have "realistic effects" if you want, quite frankly. Sure, turn them off if you can't handle it, but leave them for the purists like me who just don't want all the scars you get from that kind of thing.
    • by ZakuSage (874456)
      Perhaps they couldn't get it to work well until now?
    • Re:Why wouldn't it? (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @01:20PM (#15956689)
      Does Red Steel not have something pretty weak too - i.e. you swing the wiimote, but the sword on screen swings in a standard way, regardless of how you actually swung the remote?

      I haven't played Red Steel, but from my understanding it was initially designed so that your swing would be translated to a "canned" sword swing (horizontal, vertical, diagonal, or what not) where speed and direction were controlled. I have heard that Ubisoft is reworking the system to be more free form but the exact details are not known; I would still expect to see a limited number (possibly 10-100+) of attacks but that a greater variation would allow for a much more intuitive feel. For example Quick, Average, Power attacks in each of 8 directions for a possible 24 attacks; flicking your wrist is a quick attack, a minor swing is an Average attack and a Big swing is a power attack (having 24 varieties of attacks is a lot considering what is possible on a standard controller).

      As for Zelda ...

      I expect that every detail of controll is being tried in several ways; everyone who has worked on Zelda in the past has focused on making it one of the easiest games to controll, I wouldn't be surprised if they have tried an insane number of controll schemes with TP.
  • My poor poor arm. I don't actually Want to be Link. Holding a sword or even a very lightweight version of one and using it effectivly take lots of practice of strength most gamers don't have. Hey maybe this will be the next DDR, will we see Twilight Princess in Gym?
    • Re:My Arm (Score:5, Funny)

      by wuie (884711) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @01:10PM (#15956607)
      Never underestimate the arm/hand strength of a lonely gamer.
    • Re:My Arm (Score:5, Informative)

      by bladesjester (774793) <.moc.daehsgnillohsemaj. .ta. .todhsals.> on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @01:19PM (#15956671) Homepage Journal
      Swords aren't actually that bad. Most one hand and hand and a half swords made for actual use top out at about 5lbs with most of those being around the 3lb range. Two handed swords can creep up to 8-10lbs (with a few, like the kwan do - a type of pole sword, being really heavy), but the high end of the scale isn't that common.

      Prolonged use can be an issue, but for bursts of less than an hour it's not much of a problem at all. Unlike what most people think, using a blade is generally as much about finess and timing as it is about force, and you tend to use your full body instead of just your arm.

      Granted, I'm a little bigger than your typical geek, but I've trained people who were 105lbs or so and it didn't take them all that long to build up the necessary strength and endurance.
      • by szembek (948327)
        What the hell are these people training for?
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by masklinn (823351)

      My poor poor arm. I don't actually Want to be Link. Holding a sword or even a very lightweight version of one and using it effectivly take lots of practice of strength most gamers don't have.

      I, for one, like that. It may allow me to build strength without getting out of my mother's basement!

  • Noooooooo!!! (Score:2, Interesting)

    by laxcat (600727)

    Please, please, please no! I don't want to swing the damn sword, I want Link to swing it! I'm hoping this is just an option, not a required control scheme.

    Then again, this is IGN. Maybe they misinterperted "absolutely not" as "maybe," as per usual

    • Re:Noooooooo!!! (Score:4, Insightful)

      by clydemaxwell (935315) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @12:54PM (#15956462)
      Why are you even considering buying the Wii, then? Get the gamecube version.
      I mean, did you think it was just a glorified lightgun? The wii will require interactivity!
      • by laxcat (600727)

        Interactivity, yes! I've loved all the Wiimote functionality I've heard about so far for this version. But I just don't think motion replicating sword play is a good idea, in any game, and especially in a Zelda title where that sword really gets flying sometimes. It has the potential to wreck one of the best sword fighting systems around (if the fighting engine is indeed based off Wind Waker still, not to metion the excelent legacy of the N64 titles).

        If its a simple matter of gestures that initiate cirtai

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Edgewize (262271)
          The Wii controller is never used as a 1:1 motion replication like you see in the advertising trailers. The amount of motion you need to put in is very small; you can leave your hands by your sides or in your lap or wherever. Of course, you're still welcome to flail around if that's what you really want to do.
        • Re:Noooooooo!!! (Score:5, Interesting)

          by 7Prime (871679) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @02:27PM (#15957224) Homepage Journal

          I dunno, man, I just started a brand new game of WW last night, and went through the whole sword-fighting tutorial. I'm starting to see why Nintendo would want to move away from that, the whole button combos thing is starting to feel almost as confusing as a Metal Gear Solid control setup. Now thankfully WW is a fairly easy game, at least on the action end of things, so you're really not required to memorize all the different sword slashes, but if you really wanted to play with them while fighting enemies, it's a real pain in the ass. I mean, even simple things like whether to do a simple sword slash, a jab, an overhead slash, or a jumping slash gets hard to remember, and usually the button scheme has little to do with the actual movement, so you pretty much have to memorize it, which means it'll take a half a second or so to recall how to do it, and in the middle of a nice sword battle, you don't have time for that. I think swordplay with the Wiimote should be much more tactile, the gestures will be much more representative of the actual sword motions than simply hitting a combination of buttons, so sword dueling should be much more fun and involved this time around.

          Fatigue shouldn't be a problem. Zelda games tend to only have intense sword battles in short spurts, most of the series is about problem solving, anyway. I could imagine fatigue being an issue in, say, a Wii-based Ninja Giaden, but even then, the controller is very lightweight, and as other people have pointed out, even real-life sword technique requires very little wrist motion. A few degrees of wrist motion translates to a few feet at the other end of the sword. I did about a semester of fencing... I was pretty bad at it, but it's really not a very tiring sport, in the least. The most tiring thing about it is probably the weight of the protective gear.

          • by szembek (948327)
            What's WW?
          • by miro f (944325)
            of course in WW it doesn't matter if you do a jab, overhead slash, sideways slash, whatever. And all that ends up heppening is you just mash b until the enemy is dead.
            • by 7Prime (871679)
              That's what I'm saying. Now, Nintendo can make enemy AIs that require more precision in swordplay than was required in WW. I don't know if will happen this time around, since most of the game was originally designed for a traditional, button mashing system, but in the future, when the Zelda titles are exclusively Wii, I would hope we would start to see some of this.
      • by voice_of_all_reason (926702) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @01:26PM (#15956739)
        Ah, the convoluted mantras of a nintendo fanboy...

        The wii is the revolution, comrade! Backwards compatability to the NES! Everyone is welcome! Use either controller! It's open to all users! Family friendly games as well as more mature content! Online! The entire userbase will be satisfied... but use the fucking wiimote or I'll gut you like a fish!!!
    • Do you know how heavy swords are? The Wiimote is this little plastic thing. Deal.
      • by laxcat (600727)
        I don't complain because I'd be adverse to the exercise. I'm adverse to the idea of replacing a time tested, awesome combat system with a gimicky, shitty one.
        • They'll still have the traditional combat system in the Gamecube version. Personally, I'm waiting until there's reviews of the finalized combat systems and test systems in game stores for me to try before I decide which one to buy.
      • by 7Prime (871679)

        Very lightweight... at least good ones anyway. Modern courtswords are extremely light and have proven to be the more effective, historically, than broadswords and other two-handed blades. It's a myth that broadswords were extremely heavy... sure, they're heavier than rapiers, but even a Scottish Claymoor isn't really all that hard to handle. You always see Hollywood making it look like they were hard to even lift... that's a total myth, they were not very heavy. People use to battle with them for hours on e

    • Re:Noooooooo!!! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by _xeno_ (155264) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @01:37PM (#15956845) Homepage Journal

      How often do you actually swing the sword in the Zelda games? You're not constantly swinging the thing, assuming you're any good. You're going to be doing a few flicks every once in a while.

      Zelda is more about solving puzzles than beating up enemies. I somehow doubt that you'll find flicking the Wiimote every couple of minutes to be a big deal.

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Fozzyuw (950608)
        How often do you actually swing the sword in the Zelda games?

        For anal-retintive people like me... quite a lot. Have you ever noticed how much grass there is to cut in these games?

  • by kinglink (195330) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @12:54PM (#15956466)
    The wiimote being swung like a sword does sound good, but I don't know if it'll work with Zelda's feel. I'm sure they've tested it and it feels more natural than the B button, but I hope both options are there still.

    The problem comes in that Zelda is not an FPS. I'm sure there's not a way to move your shield up for the block except a button. But maybe the sword swinging will work. However no matter how you swing the sword, Link will only have a couple attack animations. I hope it'll work, and if so that's great but I want a little more indepth Zelda for this type of thing. Actually a bigger problem that will come up with the system is will it allow lefties to hold the wiimote in the left hand and the nunchuck attachment in the right hand. If they allow that it'll be gravy.

    What I'd really like to see is a game where you are in FPS mode but the entire game is Oblivion style, swords and shields, some bows, all controlled by the motion. that means you can hold the sword in one hand and swing it, but at the same time guard. And the best part would be the shield should basically cover your view, and hit detection on the shield should be spot on. So if a guy swings from the left, and your shield is on the right you can block it, but at the same time you can attack back, however it wouldn't be a strong attack in game, no matter how you swing your wiimote.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      Actually a bigger problem that will come up with the system is will it allow lefties to hold the wiimote in the left hand and the nunchuck attachment in the right hand

      You'd probably have to swing the controller with the left hand anyways, seeing as Link himself is left-handed.

      • by Valthan (977851)
        ...he is? I always made it so that the sword was in his right hand...
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by Scoth (879800)
          Some of the earlier games used sprite-flipping for certain directions, so it was hard to tell which hand was "official". The Zelda 2 manual makes reference to the left-handedness, and the 3D games have always had Link left-handed.

          Actually, even though I'm right handed, I've played so much Zelda that the few times I've had the occasion to do it, I've automatically picked up swords with my left hand.

          Yeah, I'm a Zelda geek. Proud of it too :) My fiancee gets sick of listening to the music though.
          • by kinglink (195330)
            Well the problem is allowing swapable control schemes. It won't matter in Zelda itself since the swinging of the wiimote is important, but in a FPS style game it will matter much more (at least if my version gets made)
    • by SScorpio (595836) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @01:29PM (#15956774)
      I'm sure there's not a way to move your shield up for the block except a button.
      From the E3 demo a sensor in the nunchuck attachment sensed acceleration and thrusting it out caused you to block.
    • by LincolnQ (648660)
      What I'd really like to see is a game where you are in FPS mode but the entire game is Oblivion style, swords and shields, some bows, all controlled by the motion. that means you can hold the sword in one hand and swing it, but at the same time guard. And the best part would be the shield should basically cover your view, and hit detection on the shield should be spot on. So if a guy swings from the left, and your shield is on the right you can block it, but at the same time you can attack back, however it
  • by dmwst30 (463874) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @12:56PM (#15956480)
    The Wii controller isn't a sword, there's not that much weight extended several feet from your arm. It's not going to take physical training for most people to use this. More importantly, given the motion detection and location detection described so far, a small twitch of your wrist should be enough to move the cursor across the screen.

    So while you CAN pretend to really sword fight, you don't NEED to do so. Nothing to complain about here.
    • by xenocide2 (231786)
      Try swinging your arm in circles for about a minute. Now try to justify how your arm, which is likely incredibly tired now, will be better able to hold up to playing Zelda sword fighting for 45 minutes to an hour. Sure, you can take short breaks, but:
      a) who wants to stop playing Zelda?
      b) zelda's design pratically requires 45 minutes of effort to accomplish anything significant. getting halfway through the water temple in ocarina for the first time, for example, was no mean feat of exploration and ingeniuity
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by dmwst30 (463874)
        Ok, I'm game. I swung my arm in circles for about a minute. I don't feel ANYTHING. I'm not tired. Are you, when you did this?

        You missed my point, you're not swinging heavy weights in large circles with the Wii controller. It seems to be more like a mouse, except you flick your wrist, or forearm, or entire arm, or entire body, to move it. You don't have to do the exact same motion each time, so you won't wear yourself out even if you did have to move it often.

        You don't spend an hour of Zelda sword figh
      • by Coryoth (254751) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @03:35PM (#15957734) Homepage Journal
        Try swinging your arm in circles for about a minute. Now try to justify how your arm, which is likely incredibly tired now, will be better able to hold up to playing Zelda sword fighting for 45 minutes to an hour.

        Because as we know it takes years of fitness training for, say, an orchestra conductor to manage to wave his baton continuously for the hour or three (depending on the performance really, some operas are rather lengthy) of a performance. I mean have you seen those guys? Nobody but extremely fit well toned people in their 20s can pull it off. Combine that with the fact that any session of Zelda is going to be continuous hack and slash effort through an endless supply of enemies (all that tedious exploration and puzzle solving and story has been done away with apparently) and yeah, I can see that it would just be brutal.
        • by steveo777 (183629)
          Very very good point. I'm getting sick of hearing about average geeks who are afraid of waving their hands around. If waving your hand about for 45 minutes gets you tired and sweaty, then get off the couch and start exercising! That's just pathetic. Hell, I'd encourage people to start weighting their remotes and build up some shoulder and forarm strength.

          Also, good point about Zelda. It's not all hack-n-slash. But that definately is a fun aspect. I can't wait to start knocking moblins or whatever off

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by oGMo (379)

          Because as we know it takes years of fitness training for, say, an orchestra conductor to manage to wave his baton continuously for the hour or three (depending on the performance really, some operas are rather lengthy) of a performance.

          You may think you're joking, but I invite you to conduct a 3-hour concert sometime. It is anything but trivial, untiring movement. Yes, you get used to it, but it does a lot of stamina. Just because you see a guy with grey hair up there doesn't mean he wouldn't be abl

          • by Coryoth (254751)
            Oddly enough was aware that conducting is not exactly trivial. It was, however, the best example that easily came to mind of someone managing arm movements for considerable periods of time without being uberfit. Yes moving your arms is tiring, but so is typing or playing the piano if you're doing it non-stop for 3 hours.
      • by 7Prime (871679)

        That would be true if using the Wiimote required anything like swinging your arms in circles... or even if REAL swordplay is anything like swinging your arms in circles. I've taken some fencing, and I can tell you, there's no swinging involved. The only swordplay that ever required any swinging at all were two-handed broadswords, and even then the slashing wasn't as obtuse as flailing. Look at Link, he's got a one-handed sword. Even the master sword, which is somewhat fashioned to look like a broadsword, is

    • by Morinaga (857587)
      Kind of like taking my gamecube controller and doing the same thing while pressing a button?
    • So while you CAN pretend to really sword fight, you don't NEED to do so. Nothing to complain about here.

      I'm glad you are so confident! Myself, I think I'll actually wait and see how it turns out before I declare it an unqualified success.

  • by y5 (993724) * on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @12:56PM (#15956483)

    Nintendo Dream closed off by asking Miyamoto to name the version of Zelda he personally prefers. The master game maker said that he'd play the Wii version, but added that both versions will be fun.

    What? What kind of stupid question...? What did they expect him to say?

    "I think I'd prefer the Gamecube version. Playing with the Wii controller just isn't intuitive - as a matter of fact, don't bother buying one. I wasted my time helping produce it, and it's embarrassing to me. Death, come quick come quick come quick..."

    • by monopole (44023)
      Death, come quick come quick come quick...
      Is there a Seppuku option for the Wimote?
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harikari [wikipedia.org]
    • Actually wasn't there a story on slashdot a few months ago where Miyamoto was basically saying that he sucked up the ending of wind waker? Granted, that was several years after its release, but he has at least been able to own up to some of his faults/failures more so than some other developers.
  • by psxman (925240) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @12:56PM (#15956486)
    People screaming "NOOOO" should remember that the Wii plays GCN games. As I recall, the only difference between the two versions of TP is the control scheme, so all you'd be missing is the control scheme you don't like.

    (this is assuming that the Wii version requires the sword-swinging, and doesn't merely have it as an option, in which case none of this matters)
  • Sword? (Score:5, Funny)

    by dohzer (867770) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @01:02PM (#15956540) Homepage
    Sword shmord! I want to be able to play the Wiimote like an ocarina!
    • by Scoth (879800)
      Well, there's always the old OoT glitch that lets you play anything like the ocarina:

      http://www.jaytheham.com/zc/oot.php?page=ootmc018 [jaytheham.com]

      Apparently Link plays a mean bow.
    • by RyoShin (610051)
      While this was probably meant as funny, I would see it as being too far from a possibility, both in this and other games with musical instruments. With the speaker built into the remote, you would use the A, B, and D-pad buttons for notes, and actually hear it coming out near your hands.

      Imagine using this kind of stuff with Guitar Hero.
  • Ambidextrous Link? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by the_crowing (992960) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @01:22PM (#15956705)
    Has anyone ever noticed that Link is left-handed? I wonder if Nintendo is going to allow Link to hold the sword in either hand to match the players unidexterity? I'm not an experienced swordsmen by any means, but I think I would have a hard time playing a game that forced me to use my left hand for something like that since, like the majority of the population, I'm right handed. And I think it would be pretty awkward swinging my right arm and watching Link mirror my motion with his left.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by SQLGuru (980662)

      Inigo Montoya: You are wonderful.
      Man in Black: Thank you; I've worked hard to become so.
      Inigo Montoya: I admit it, you are better than I am.
      Man in Black: Then why are you smiling?
      Inigo Montoya: Because I know something you don't know.
      Man in Black: And what is that?
      Inigo Montoya: I... am not left-handed.
      [Moves his sword to his right hand and gains an advantage]
      Man in Black: You are amazing.
      Inigo Montoya: I ought to be, after 20 years.
      Man in Black: Oh, there's something I ought to tell you.
      Inigo Montoya: Tell

    • by mdielmann (514750) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @02:46PM (#15957354) Homepage Journal
      like the majority of the population, I'm right handed

      Welcome to my world, you bastard! I have to use my off hand for shifting (I live in North America), I have to use the weaker muscles of my hand when inserting screws with a screwdriver, most can openers require that you turn them with your right hand (or turn the can upside down - that'll work!), my blackberry has the main control buttons by my fingers instead of by my thumb, the list goes on and on! But you have to use somewhat unusual actions when playing Link with the wii controller. My heart bleeds.
      </pseudo-rant>

      All kidding aside, you'd be surprised with the number of inconveniences left-handed people deal with every day. I trained myself to be somewhat ambidextrous to compensate for that, in those rare circumstances where I'd rather do it poorly with my right hand than do it with difficulty or danger with my left hand.
  • They'd BETTER allow Link to hold the sword in his left hand and sheild on the right if the player is a leftie. I'm NOT, but I would want to switch back and forth to work on ambidexriousness and keep my arms a bit more balanced. Man I just realized, with THIS controller the Wii could support lefties in all games and become THE official leftie gaming console! I hope someone at Nintendo has already added this to Zelda and other games or some people are going to be really disappointed.
  • by WillAffleckUW (858324) on Tuesday August 22, 2006 @03:16PM (#15957587) Homepage Journal
    I was watching Hellboy with my girlfriend, and we had both been talking about how some movies couldn't be made before CGI.

    But during the movie, Hellboy grabs a stone sword from a statue and starts cutting through the CGI tentacle god. I noticed - because I've used cutlasses, epees, and other swords - that he literally cut through it as if it weren't there (which it wasn't, he swung the sword before the CGI monster was added).

    My technical question is: exactly how are they going to deal with sword resistance - when I chop through a tentacle, or for example let's just use a chicken here, or an octopus, there is resistance which:

    a. slows my sword, even when I'm in a very fast spin attack; and

    b. puts pressure on my wrist, arm, and shoulder due to that.

    Now, are we going to have to live in a world of "massless" monsters, and then they'll have to change iron golems into marshmallow golems?

    Or will the Wii controller have some feedback loops, like heavy vibration and sounds and the image on the screen slows to represent what really would happen?

    Just wondering.
    • Warning: Sword geek response below.

      I train in iaijutsu, or Japanese sword drawing. Every so often we do tameshigiri, or mat cutting. I can say from experience that if you've got the proper technique, when you cut through mats you feel almost no resistance at all.

      But I do agree that if there's something hard in the game that you're swinging against, such as an armored opponent or someone's shield, you should feel resistance. Maybe audio and visual cues, enough to let you know that you've hit somethi
    • by grumbel (592662)

      My technical question is: exactly how are they going to deal with sword resistance

      The answer is quite simple: they don't. So far no games allows you to swing a sword in a remotly realistic manner, its all just predefined attacks mapped to strokes from the Wiimote. So since you never actually control the sword, there is no reason to handle resistance in the first place.

      If there actually will come realistic sword games we will see, but so far most discussion on that subject is more about dream than abo

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by WillAffleckUW (858324)
        Ah, but couldn't they make sure the game sends:

        a. rumble feature on contact with non-gelatinous beastie or human, to simulate vibration effects when you hit something that has resistance;

        b. noise feature on contact with object, to use auditory feedback such as: .1. Clang (hitting armoured individual or stone/metal surface) .2. Chunk (hitting wood or something like that) .3. Grrk (hitting flesh or thickish material) .4. Slice (highly strong weapon hitting something it is good at cutting)

        and then modulate the
        • by grumbel (592662)

          It's a software problem, not a device problem - the devices are all there - sound output in the Wiimote, rumble in the Wiimote, sound output on screen, visual feedback on screen.

          Yep, the controller in theory has everything that would be needed, at least I hope, still not sure if its really full 3D or just close to it, there is something optical involved that might require you to point it to the sensor-bar to fully function. Anyway, the reason why probally nobody has tried it is most likly because its simp

        • Say your character walks up to an iron pole. You, with your trusty wiimote, take a big swing. Good old fashioned straight horizontal right to left cut, shoulder level. Think baseball swing.

          Your wiimote, of course, will wind up somewhere to the left of you. Your character, however, will have his sword back to his right, as it will have bounced off of the pole.

          How to reconcile the fact that your wiimote's phyical position no longer corresponds to the virtual sword's position?

    • I know this is unlikly, but if they added a couple of *censored* into the wiimote, that can certianly provide resistance. Wait... I better patent that!

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