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Download Torrents With Your PC Turned Off 318

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the building-your-hardware-with-steroids dept.
Mr.Tweak writes to tell us that they have a review posted of a new wireless router from ASUS. What sets this router apart from others is that in addition to being a wireless router/gateway is that it also functions as a thin client system with a pre-installed 160 GB IDE drive (no SATA support sorry) and three USB 2.0 ports for peripherals. If you happen to use one of those USB ports for another drive the router will also support RAID 0 and 1, quite a bit more than the average router.
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Download Torrents With Your PC Turned Off

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  • news? (Score:5, Funny)

    by macadamia_harold (947445) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @07:26PM (#15945708) Homepage
    This isn't anything new. According to the RIAA, you can download music without even owning a computer.
    • Re:news? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Uruviel (772554) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @08:15PM (#15945843) Homepage
      Let's not shoot ourself in the foot now. There are perfectly legitimate uses for torrents. Like downloading your favorite Linux distro. Which you could then install on your machine when finished with a wake-on-lan call from that very same router. See the possibilities are endless and all you think of is music.
      • Re:news? (Score:5, Funny)

        by Mister Whirly (964219) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @09:08PM (#15945997) Homepage
        Yeah, I'm relatively sure that 99% of torrent download ARE legitimate things like linux distros... Because terrabytes of distros are released EVERY DAY and that's what the majority of users are downloading...

        I'm not denying that there aren't legitimate uses for torrents, but don't try to blow smoke up anyone's ass about what the majority are currently using it for.. I'm sure a few people will chime in and list their legitimate uses, but how many are going to chime in and admit they are violating (bullshit) copyright laws??
        • by hackstraw (262471) *
          Yeah, I'm relatively sure that 99% of torrent download ARE legitimate things like linux distros..

          99% of the torrents I download are legitimate things. Those that aren't are usually software that I want to try and then don't use because they are inferior to freely available alternatives.

          Oh, and 99% of the legitimate 99% is music. Its just legal http://bt.etree.org/ [etree.org] and http://www.archive.org/audio [archive.org] for starts.
          • 99% of the legitimate 99% is music. Its just legal http://bt.etree.org/ [etree.org] and http://www.archive.org/audio [archive.org] for starts.

            How do you know that the independent music that you download is lawful? Heck, how do even the bands know that their music is lawful, given the subconscious copying doctrine [columbia.edu]?

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            Those that aren't are usually software that I want to try and then don't use because they are inferior to freely available alternatives.

            Is that your variation of the "Test this for a while and if you like it, buy it!" .NFO files that are distributed with pirate software. That "justification" (as much as it ever was one) went out the door a long time ago. Most software comes with a trial version now. Stuff that doesn't tends to be more specialised, but you're equally likely to be able to call someone and th

        • "but how many are going to chime in and admit they are violating (bullshit) copyright laws??"
          If by "bullshit" you mean "American" then I'm pretty sure you can find 35,000,000 people living just north of you who wouldn't mind saying it.
        • by NineNine (235196)
          I just started seeding a full copy of "Loose Change" a few hours ago. Maybe it's starting to get used to spread information? It may not be all Brittney Spears MP3's yet. Bit Torrent is a bit too complicated to be used by the mouth breathers. It's not really all that mainstream outside of geeks yet. Outside of largely libertarian types. Ya' think?
      • "Let's not shoot ourself in the foot now. There are perfectly legitimate uses for torrents. Like downloading your favorite Linux distro"

        Yes... the mirrors are frequently overloaded after a major release. Torrents are often the only way to get your favorite distro in a timely fashion.
  • It seems like a full computer would be better than this in just about every aspect--price, power consumption, etc.
    • by TommydCat (791543) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @07:36PM (#15945733) Homepage
      In this page-and-a-half-spread-out-to-69-pages review, I didn't actually see the price listed, though it was listed as one of the cons. What is the price of this device?

      I personally am not stirred by this as I have a set of linux servers set up to do the same functionality with much more speed and efficiency, but I can see this as a neat black-box turn-key solution for someone who can't deal with that level of complexity but can deal with a straight-forward UI.

      What I'd like to see in a review like this is what throughput can the SAMBA server give among multiple clients, how many connections the bit-torrent client can handle before melting, what types of printers it can serve (Jetdirect, USB, real Centronics, etc)... you know, useful information I can use to make an informed decision.

      Oh well...

      • by livewire98801 (916940) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @07:43PM (#15945768)
        $260 on newegg
        linky [newegg.com]
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by nine-times (778537)

        I personally am not stirred by this as I have a set of linux servers set up to do the same functionality with much more speed and efficiency, but I can see this as a neat black-box turn-key solution for someone who can't deal with that level of complexity but can deal with a straight-forward UI.

        Well I'm kind of jazzed about the idea, even if not the implementation. The reason is this: I don't have the money or space for a set of Linux servers. I've been expecting for some time that someone would start

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by djrogers (153854)

          * a web server
          * E-mail (SMTP, IMAP) server
          * DNS server
          * a file server (SMB, AFP) for internal (with a big hard drive)
          * ssh access
          * complete headless setup and configuration
          * very small (Mac mini sized or smaller)
          * maybe a print server
          * wireless access point
          * maybe VPN from the outside, or site-to-site tunnels
          * some means to back the whole thing up (easily)

          2 suggestions spring to mind - a KuroBox [kurobox.com] for about $150, or if you'd like it with a drive already installed, a Buffalo Linkstati [newegg.com]

          • huh... both of these look pretty interesting. But the deal is that KuroBox is more open? How tricky is it to reflash? Is there a real risk of bricking the thing?
        • I've been expecting for some time that someone would start making "home servers"

          Under the policies of many last-mile duopoly ISPs, you don't have the legal right to expose your "home servers" to the Internet over their privately owned network unless you upgrade from residential Internet service to business Internet service. Worse yet, through the tying practices that cities let the telcos get away with, this may entail an upgrade from residential wire-line phone service to business wire-line phone service

          • True enough, and that is quite a shame. However, I hate the idea that I need to store things on someone else's server (and therefore lose control of it) in order to have access to it over the internet. Along with everything else, a good, easy to set up, home server might start showing people why ISPs closing off ports is a bad thing. As it is, I think ISPs get away with it because most of their customers have no idea it's happening, and wouldn't know how to set up their own web server if they had port 80
    • by ForestGrump (644805) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @07:42PM (#15945763) Homepage Journal
      Because I'm afraid of having my data compromised.

      I use the router to interface with the interweb for what I need.

      Firstly, I script what I want the router to send/get. then I disconnect my computer, connect the wAN side of the router to the interweb. When the script is done, I disconnect the WAN side of the router, connect my computer to the router and copy off the router HDD. Sure it's a pain in the butt, but what am I to do? live without the interweb?

      Grump.

      -------
      This message uploaded to you by ASUS WL-700gE router using Interweb interface 3.02

      -----
      • That's pretty hardcore geeking to set that up, but cool nonetheless. I'm curious, does that hurt your latency/bandwidth very much? And, what kind of script is it? Python, etc?
        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by ForestGrump (644805)
          bandwidth? not really. I mean, you're buying a 3 meg connection, but reality is that it sits idle most of the time. If you script your send/fetch web stuff, even dialup is no problem (unless you're doing something stupid like downloading videos.) As for latency, it's a matter of how fast I can get the script to send/receive what I need. Once that's done, it's almost instantenous between the router and the dot matrix printer (monitors cause cancer and LCDs don't have enough contrast).

          And scripting langua
      • It would seem much easier to buy a real computer as a firewall.
      • by pboulang (16954)
        Instant Messages give me blisters! :)
      • by xQx (5744) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @08:05PM (#15945815)
        All your script are belong to us.

        It does take a painfully long time to hack your computer tho, I'm like:

        CD \windows
        dir
        [wait for you to disconnect from the web, plug the modem into the PC, run 0wned script, plug back into the net]
        cd system32
        dir
        [again...]

        Well, that's where I'm up to anyway...
        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by abb3w (696381)
          Use "CD %SYSTEMDRIVE%" and "CD %SYSTEMROOT%\SYSTEM32" instead. Otherwise you may run into problems on systems using (say) D:\WINXP as the system drive & folder. On my system, C:\WINNT and C:\WINDOWS are decoys.
    • by Anonymous Coward
      "It seems like a full computer would be better than this in just about every aspect--price, power consumption, etc."

      Heat! Time! Remember not everyone's a geek, and shouldn't have to be to get some of the offered features.
      • by TubeSteak (669689)
        Heat?

        If this router isn't pumping out thousands of BTUs, how am I supposed to keep my room warm in the winter?

        And I don't even live in the basement!
        • by Kadin2048 (468275)
          That's what Pentium 4s or PPC970s (your choice) are for.

          Me personally, I have a dual-proc PPC970-based system and a P4-based Linux workstation. It gets cold in the winter.
    • Why not use a full computer? Because this is smaller, easier to set up, and it's probably cheaper, lower power, and it Just Works©.

      Everytime something new comes along, there's atleast one person that says "Why not just use $existingTech?" Maybe because the existing method isn't as efficient as it seems?

      Why use wireless when you can just use CAT5? Why store files on another machine when you can just add another hard drive to your current one? Why not just use an abacus?
      • by spicyjeff (6305)
        [quote]Because this is smaller, easier to set up,[...] lower power, and it Just Works©[/quote]

        Just use a Mac mini and your existing router and get a whole lot more with everything you wanted above.
        • At a much higher cost. A Mac Mini starts at $600. A WRT54GL is $70 at Newegg. We'll leave out the fact that at most a stock Mac Mini comes with a 120GB hard drive, according to the Apple Store. But what about this handy device? $260 on Newegg. Sure, you could do more with a Mac Mini, but you could also do more with a Mac Pro, so why stop at a Mac Mini?
    • by Schemat1c (464768)
      It seems like a full computer would be better than this in just about every aspect--price, power consumption, etc.

      I use the Kuro box [kurobox.com] for my always on bittorrent box. It is very small, cheap and only uses about 40 watts of power.

  • by LiquidCoooled (634315) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @07:27PM (#15945714) Homepage Journal
    Yes, it does run linux.
  • by Bromskloss (750445) <auxiliary.addres ... ]com ['il.' in > on Sunday August 20, 2006 @07:27PM (#15945715)
    Wow, now let's put into it _all_ functionality we expect from a computer! ;-)
  • This is good news, but I wonder if it's web interface, stability and value is up to par with other networking routers. I hope that they won't be using a stupid mini OS that will crash every once it receives too many connections. Even better, could people boot Linux on it?

    I know this is a bit off-topic, but does it provide sufficent cooling? I've been using many routers throughout the years and most of them have processors without heatsinks which heat up A LOT. In fact, I install a fan on every switch that I
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Pete Brubaker (35550)
      Well, I know it's a pain, but if you read the _whole_ article, it did say that it was shipped with Linux.
  • Where is TheTorrent? (Score:5, Informative)

    by junglee_iitk (651040) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @07:33PM (#15945724)
    What's with not using the word torrent in the whole summary?

    Here is the part of the article:
    "Applications lets you enable/disable the router's inbuilt applications - Download Master, Download Daemon, Download Share, Photo Album and Media Server, as well as do some basic configuration like specifying the port range and default seeding time for the BitTorrent client, and the default web server port. You can also configure the settings for an attached USB webcam, enabling to run via a web interface, and even turning it into a security camera controlled by the router, which can enable motion detection and email alerts. And finally, locally-attached USB printers can be configured and shared out - ready for connection from UPnP-enabled clients."

    And here is the link :)
    http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/939/5/page_5_syst em_features_configuration/index.html [tweaktown.com]
  • Power consumption? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by slapyslapslap (995769) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @07:33PM (#15945726)
    I have to assume that power consumption is going to go up to power this thing. If I was turning off my PC to save power, I don't think I'd want this thing.
    • This router isn't running a GPU or an Intel Pentium IV Extreme just to route packets and download torrents. I haven't looked yet, but Asus engineers probably have dedicated chips doing all that stuff.
  • Smoothwall anyone? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Vrejakti (729758) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @07:37PM (#15945736) Homepage Journal
    What's so new about this? http://smoothwall.org/ [smoothwall.org], http://ipcop.org/ [ipcop.org] and http://m0n0.ch/wall/ [m0n0.ch] could easily be custimized to perform a similar function. Easy as installing a bittorrent application, and using SSH.

    By the way, these 3 options happen to be free and upgradable.
    • by NetRAVEN5000 (905777) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @08:01PM (#15945806) Homepage
      How do you install any of those on a ROUTER?

      The beauty of this ROUTER is that you don't need to leave a PC on for your downloads anymore. Or, at least you can leave your PC's cycles to do something else, be it gaming, Folding@Home, or whatever else.

      Not only that, but now you don't need to run your fileserver AND your Web server, since it's got a built-in fileserver and Web server. It also has a print server if you've got PCs dedicated for that.

      Your router needs to be on anyways, so. . .
      • by chill (34294)
        How do you install any of those on a ROUTER?

        With OpenWRT and any of a number of compatible routers.

        http://openwrt.org/ [openwrt.org]

  • Raid over usb? (Score:2, Informative)

    That seem like a bad choice as usb has a lot of cpu over head firewire or e-sata wound of been better.

    It also only has a basic BitTorrent client.

    I wonder how it stands up under a full raid and bitTorrent load.
  • But it needs...... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ericdano (113424) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @07:41PM (#15945758) Homepage
    It needs more than the ability to run Bittorrent. You need something like Peer Guardian running to filter out all those "bad" IP Addresses.

    It's more of a NAS meets Wireless router. Which is cool, but....yeah....so?
    • by mattgreen (701203)
      But everyone knows that BitTorrent is primarily used for people seeding Linux ISOs and other highly legal things, so what sort of bad IP addresses are you referring to? I haven't ever had a problem with a client sending me malformed portions of the newest Ubuntu ISO.
  • Brilliant for retail (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Nefarious Wheel (628136) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @07:42PM (#15945764) Journal
    Just saw this last week. In retail grocery we pump a lot of data back and forth between head office, store back office, and the lanes. Anything -- and I mean anything that keeps us from having to lay another cable or put another piece of bulky hardware under the sales counter is a bonus. I could see these things used in the C racks at the front to stage price changes, etc. and being retail the fact that they are utterly dirt cheap will have a broad appeal.

    This one's a winner, I think.

    • by Ruie (30480)

      Just saw this last week. In retail grocery we pump a lot of data back and forth between head office, store back office, and the lanes. Anything -- and I mean anything that keeps us from having to lay another cable or put another piece of bulky hardware under the sales counter is a bonus. I could see these things used in the C racks at the front to stage price changes, etc. and being retail the fact that they are utterly dirt cheap will have a broad appeal.

      How much is "a lot" ? I am asking because it is no

  • by ArcherB (796902) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @07:45PM (#15945772) Journal
    from TFA:
    There's a rapidly-expanding section of the home electronics market which revolves around "devices". The reason for the parentheses is that it's difficult to know how to label these gadgets, because they don't fit easily into any pre-defined categories.


    Isn't a parentheses one of these ( )?
    And aren't these " " called quotation marks?

    Sorry, but it's hard to take an article seriously when the author doesn't know the difference.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward
      I hate to break this to you, but I know some people who are world-class experts in their (smallish) scientific fields who use grammar from their native languages in English, or who spell at about the level of 13 year-olds (despite being a native speaker). I like good spelling and grammar too, but their absence doesn't automatically invalidate the content of an article.
      • I'm not GP poster, but I don't quite agree with you in this particular case.

        a REVIEWER better use words the way I and the subject audience expect them to be used.

        to describe an object to which I am unfamiliar, with poor english skills, does mean the reviewer fails in their task.

        the purpose of the tech review is to use words with which I am familar, to describe something that I am not familar with.

        Let's say the review includes the use of the word orange to describe the case.. if it was in fact blue wouldn't
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by g0at (135364)
      Isn't a parentheses one of these ( )?

      And aren't these " " called quotation marks?


      Pretty close... one of those curved things is a parenthesis. Two of them are parentheses. Your thinking is in the right place though.

      -b
  • by pHatidic (163975) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @08:06PM (#15945821)
    And I thought wow, this is by far the best news of the day. Then I saw that there is a new drug just like morphine, only non-addictive. And then I thought, wow, I thought AIDs being cured was a big deal, but that's nothing compared to this. And now I see that I can download porno movies without even turning on my computer. God I love /.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by miro f (944325)

      And now I see that I can download porno movies without even turning on my computer.

      unfortunately, not. You have to turn on your computer in order to tell the router to download your porno. Then you can turn it off while you wait for the porn. Then your sister uses it to download the second season of Buffy and notices all the stuff you've downloaded.

      Meanwhile I've always just used TorrentFlux [torrentflux.com] installed on my linux server, works fine for me. (still doesn't hide my downloads from other users, however)

      • by eclectro (227083)
        (still doesn't hide my downloads from other users, however)

        Isn't that the point of a torrent - not being a one way leech. Am I missing something?
  • Thin Client (Score:3, Interesting)

    by DeathElk (883654) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @08:07PM (#15945828)
    Why does a thin client need 160GB?
    • by ttldkns (737309)
      yeah i know
      totally the wrong use of the term "thin client". I was expecting it to provide or use some sort of terminal server functionality. Now that would be pointless!
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Ruie (30480)
      Why does a thin client need 160GB?

      To cache data from 160TB server. What kind of question is that ?

  • by ivan256 (17499) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @08:14PM (#15945842)
    ...Video at 11:00.
  • by duplo1 (719988) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @08:22PM (#15945866)
    I find it crazy that people are running more and more applications directly on their Internet router. The more applications and services there are running, the more likely a serious security flaw will be found in the device. Do they really think this through? This is just going to be another attack vector for script kiddies to own peoples' networks. Several months after they release this, another vendor will be releasing a seperate firewall/router to protect this device.
    • by cpghost (719344)

      Right; esp. when people are novices. But for experienced sysadmins, a "fat router" is quite useful, especially at home where you want to keep your electricity bill unter control.

      A typical setup on any low-power 24/7 device, like some routers, or general purpose boards a la net4801 [soekris.com] includes OpenBSD or FreeBSD with userland-ppp, pf and BIND, plus, if needed, postfix, lighttpd, cyrus-imap, etc...; all running tightly within their jail(8)s and closely monitored.

      This would be the maximum, and from a security

      • > But for experienced sysadmins, a "fat router" is quite useful, especially at
        > home where you want to keep your electricity bill unter control.

        Experienced admins should know better than to run services on a router.
        • by cpghost (719344)

          Experienced admins should know better than to run services on a router.

          Correct. But experienced admins would also use professional equipment; and it's impossible to run apps on IOS etc...

          Fat routers do have their uses though in very special situations. From a security POV, if you're the only user of a router (say, you're sitting at the end of a cable or adsl line) with a tiny home-LAN; the "fat router" is nothing more than two physical machines folded into one. If a cracker were able to break into the

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Crayon Kid (700279)
      Personally, I'm more interested by the fact that small power devices can do more and more when it comes to Internet connectivity. Will they eventually delegate all such functionality to separate devices?
  • by Dr. Spork (142693) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @08:28PM (#15945877)
    Seriously, I'm sure the processor in that router is strong enough to handle Skype. Just put a radio transmitter on it and bundle two wireless handsets , and you get what lots of people wish for: Skype without a running computer! (Maybe it should also plug into a regular phone socket so you can use your old phones.)

    Here's why it makes sense to do this on a router:

    For one thing, everyone's router is always on, so there is nothing extra in the house sucking power. Maybe more relevant: The router, when Skype is being used, can be set to automatically throttle back the up/down bandwith that it's passing to connected computers (or using for its own bittorrent). This helps prevent degradation of Skype quality. And third, this would be totally simple - just plug in the router, tell it your Skype login/pass, and all your contacts are imported (Skype itself stores those things).

    The effect with SkypeIn would essentially be: Vonage without the fees (or for $30/year for SkypeIn)... no, better, because Vonage sounds like crap when I'm using unthrotteled bittorrent. This would justify the price of the hardware, and if the manufacturer could keep the costs low, it would also be very good for Skype/eBay and its userbase. Maybe Ebay could subsidize the costs a bit, and offer free SkypeIn for a year, since anyone who buys this will also probably buy SkypeOut minutes eventually.

    • by massysett (910130)
      Good idea, but the Skype Wi-Fi Phone [skype.com] has this pretty much covered. Not available yet though. Even if it were, I wouldn't buy it because I wouldn't pay hundreds of bucks for a phone that's locked into somebody's proprietary protocol. If it were an open protocol I'd buy it in a second.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by StikyPad (445176)
      Gigabit would be nice too. Why push the envelope with everything except speed, especially since people will need to transfer those torrents off the router once they're done?
    • Killer App Followup:

      Teleco's auto lawsuit, everytime someone stops using phone service they sue your company.

      Next "Device": Auto legal, program in legal filings to respond to outside legal attacks... It's the new Legal Firewall (I'm seriously copywriting that don't get any ideas).

      Coming soon: The legal/legal/legal/legal firewall buster buster buster. (It busts the other guy's Legal Brief Who's Briefing your breif!).
  • Botnets (Score:2, Insightful)

    by DigitAl56K (805623)
    This is a great idea, _but_ imagine the possibilities for rooting these devices. With a harddrive so large, and a processor at least powerful enough to handle BitTorrent, imagine the possibilities for a remote user to install malware on it. Mail relays, fake websites, even packet sniffers to capture your login as you use online banking.

    Worse still, you can run various anti-malware and anti-virus tools on your desktop, but how do you plan to even detect your router being rooted, let alone repair it? (and no,
    • The old joke (Score:3, Insightful)

      by dbIII (701233)
      This is linux malware. Please switch user to root and install it.

      To be serious - there are rootkits out there that script kiddies use, but they need a way in first. If the router is not running much and has the admin tools all restricted to only work through the internal ethernet interface then there really are not very many ways in. I've seen a linux box that got rooted - after it had been sitting unpatched for a couple of years somebody decided it was a good idea to give all email users an executable

  • by exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @09:19PM (#15946030) Journal
    ...my NSLU2 [nslu2-linux.org].
  • Missing something (Score:4, Interesting)

    by kahrytan (913147) on Sunday August 20, 2006 @10:27PM (#15946217)
    This type of router would be much more functional if it had a proxy server capabilities with builtin virus scanner.

      Though, Asus is starting something Linksys, Dlink and Netgear will probably jump on.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by hacker (14635)

      My Linksys WRT54G [wikipedia.org] (not GS) is a transparent Squid [squid-cache.org] proxy already. I don't see why this ASUS machine can't do the same.

      It points to a secondary FreeBSD [freebsd.org] machine for that, because I have a 5GiB cache on the Squid [squid-cache.org] side. Everything is anonymized through Privoxy [privoxy.org] + Tor [eff.org], with no configuration changes on the client side.

      Users don't even know (or care) that their traffic is being proxied or anonymized at all.

      For user data stored on the FreeBSD machine, I also use [gnu-designs.com] rsnapshot [rsnapshot.org] to do backups of another disk slice tha

  • Why do they have a picture of a Linksys WAP54G on every page and list prices for them when the article is talking about a different router? Their other articles seem to have ads targeted at the subject of the article.
  • So now people too cheap to pay for books, movies, cable TV, music, and software no longer have to pay to keep their 350 watt power supplies running all day either? What's the chance someone that cheap would actually pay for the router?
  • Use Kurobox (Score:3, Interesting)

    by kylehase (982334) on Monday August 21, 2006 @01:26AM (#15946704)
    I use the Kurobox [kurobox.com] for this. The kurobox is basically a modified version of the Buffalo link station but it is designed to be reloaded with a custom linux. Some pre-configured images are available and include tons of apps for torrent, dyndns, LAMP, e-donkey, samba and all kinds of other stuff. It has a USB port which you could use for another hard drive or USB NIC to turn it into a firewall or router although I'm sure most slashdot readers already have pretty good routers. I think linksys made a hackable NAS too but I haven't tried that one.
  • Not so happy (Score:3, Interesting)

    by citro (940077) on Monday August 21, 2006 @02:38AM (#15946876)
    I bought Asus WL500G Premium (wl500gp), a lighter version of the router from TFA. The hype is similar - Download with the PC turned off. The main difference is that wl500gp does not have a storage unit included and the user must attach one if wants to enjoy computerless leeching.

    Bottomline:
    - nice router - I live in an apartment, and I have all around coverage: 18MBps WLAN connection through a couple of walls, 1 - 1 1/2 feet thick each;
    - buggy firmware - (e.g. the only way to set the date and time on router is to use the included and non-functional NTP client, no way to set or check the number of simultaneous NAT connections, no way to modify radio power)
    - the Download Master does not work (the torrents fail to start)
    - lame online support

    I hope that the alternative firmware OSS projects (such as http://www.dd-wrt.com/dd-wrtv2/index.php [dd-wrt.com] or http://www.wl500g.info/ [wl500g.info] or http://www.openwrt.org/ [openwrt.org] will provide a stable alternative.
  • by b0s0z0ku (752509) on Monday August 21, 2006 @07:44AM (#15947562)
    Cost $120 6 mo. ago and had most of the same functionality, apart from the internal drive. An external drive can be hooked up via USB 2.0 however. And, yes, it runs Linux - in fact, it's meant to be hackable.

    So move along here - nothing new to see, really...

    -b.

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