Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Yahoo! Launches Python Developer Center 125

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the snakes-on-a-page dept.
SimonW writes "Yahoo! has launched a Python Developer Center as part of their Developer Network. The new site explains how to access Yahoo!'s many web service APIs using Python, and includes tutorials on using Python with REST, JSON, XML and RSS. The site joins Yahoo!'s existing developer centers for PHP and JavaScript."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Yahoo! Launches Python Developer Center

Comments Filter:
  • Javascript (Score:5, Insightful)

    by kevin_conaway (585204) on Wednesday August 09, 2006 @11:13AM (#15874501) Homepage

    Python developer, I think this is great. I'm glad that Python is gaining more acceptance.

    If the quality is on par with their Javascript library, we're in for a real treat

  • Whython (Score:3, Interesting)

    by CopaceticOpus (965603) on Wednesday August 09, 2006 @11:21AM (#15874546)
    It's pretty cool of Yahoo to provide so much to the dev community. It's definitely improved my feelings about the company.

    I wonder why they've made this foray into the Python world? I know they decided to focus on PHP a few years back. Did they find some tasks were easier to accomplish in Python? Or are they simply trying to reach out to another developer community?
  • How refreshing! (Score:1, Interesting)

    by y5 (993724)

    Every time I see a story about Yahoo concerning developers, it's exactly what I want to hear. While their competitors are saying "do no evil", Yahoo seems to be living it.

    I don't know if I'm quite there yet, but my hard-to-break habit of Googling everything might be worth breaking if this kind of developer-focused attitude from Yahoo continues like it has. It's at least very tempting.

    • by Daytona955i (448665) <flynnguy24 AT yahoo DOT com> on Wednesday August 09, 2006 @11:30AM (#15874613)
      Yes, because it's not like google [google.com] has anything like this [google.com] available. [google.com]
    • Re:How refreshing! (Score:3, Insightful)

      by LnxAddct (679316)
      Because Google's Summer of Code, or code.google.com or, more importantly, code.google.com/hosting weren't enough? The hundred patches that Google gave back to Wine after getting Wine to work with Picasa, or the many other libraries and APIs that Google provides. What Yahoo is doing is great, but you're not giving Google nearly enough credit.
      Regards,
      Steve
      • Re:How refreshing! (Score:5, Interesting)

        by y5 (993724) on Wednesday August 09, 2006 @11:46AM (#15874733)

        What Yahoo is doing is great, but you're not giving Google nearly enough credit.

        You might be right. But I've had the chance to use the Web API's for Yahoo, Google, and MSN. Yahoo's Web Search API has been much easier to use than Google's or MSN's. I know there are many other API's to use than just web search, but I've been impressed with what I've seen from Yahoo, more so than from the others.

        Direction is everything, and you have to admit Yahoo has been moving in the right direction lately. Here's to hoping they don't lose focus of what's giving them such good publicity! =)

    • While their competitors are saying "do no evil", Yahoo seems to be living it.

      Need I remind you about the X10 popups? That caused me to switch my home page over to Google and have never, ever looked back.

      Perhaps Yahoo is just playing catchup to google with crap like search.yahoo.com and now this. Seems like they are no longer innovating but they are just copying.

      Seen their new Mail client? Fully Ajax driven. Hmmm. Gmail anyone?
  • Yawn. (Score:2, Funny)

    by JoeyLemur (10451)
    Wake me when they create a Ruby/Rails section.

    Guido! Let my whitespace go!
    • Re:Yawn. (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      > Wake me when they create a Ruby/Rails section.

      Snakes and a Train?

    • Whitespace (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 09, 2006 @12:05PM (#15874893)

      I know everybody gets hung up on the whitespace thing when they look at Python. But you know what? Once you start actually coding in it for any significant amount of time, it's not a big deal. When you first start, I know you expect it to be really annoying, but that simply doesn't turn out to be the case. The supposed problem evaporates.

      Every time you hear anybody moan about Python's significant whitespace, ask them how long they've spent actually writing Python. You'll see the same thing as I do - that virtually everybody complaining has never given Python a chance, and that virtually everybody who has given Python a chance has realised that the significant whitespace isn't a big deal.

      • by Anonymous Coward
        That's true. Once you use Python for a significant amount of time, you find that there are far more annoying aspects of the language than significant whitespace.
        • Like what?
          • Re:Whitespace (Score:2, Informative)

            by bhaberman (898289)
            No lambdas, no ternary operator (yes I know, not pythonic), no switch statement (think Ruby, not C++), scoping rules are wrong (for example, list comprehensions leak variables - C++ for loops don't!).

            Underscores! __init__ __new__ __getattr__ __setattr__ __len__ __getitem__ . . . .

            range(1,5) = [1, 2, 3, 4]

            The list goes on and on and on and on and on. Python has an incredible number of infuriating misfeatures for such a useful language.

            Python sort of pretends to be a functional language, and you can do a lot
            • No lambdas? Seriously? So the lambda keyword that my copy of Python 2.5 recognises is..what? A local patch? Or simply evidence that you don't have the slightest clue of what you're talking about?

              No ternary operator? Firstly, this isn't C, and secondly, you'll be happy to know that people who're unwilling to learn new approaches have bitched often and hard enough that it now exists in a pythonic form: http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0308/ [python.org] You'll find the PEP interesting for at least two reasons (hint: i

            • No lambdas
              Well, of course that isn't true. Lambda is syntactically limited in Python. Instead you have to use named functions if you are doing something complicated that can't fit in a lambda. That causes two changes: you have to come up with a name for the function (which I don't think is a substantial burden) and you have to declare the function before you use it (which can be a little annoying in some circumstances). But altogether, the lambda thing is way overused as a criticism; anonymous func
    • Ughhh, so you're touting a model-view-controller type of Web development framework and yet you need a tutorial from Yahoo in order to tie into neutral services?

      Why don't you write a Rails/Yahoo API tutorial?

  • Howto (Score:4, Informative)

    by kevin_conaway (585204) on Wednesday August 09, 2006 @11:35AM (#15874651) Homepage

    Furthermore, unlike their previous offerings, they have released little new code here. The only code they have released is an API to their search engine. The rest seem to be HOWTOs on how to python to access their services.

    Still good info though. Thanks

  • by halosfan (691623) on Wednesday August 09, 2006 @11:42AM (#15874709) Homepage

    While browsing through this, I noticed the following in ther Weather RSS feed page:

    The feeds are provided free of charge for use by individuals and non-profit organizations for personal, non-commercial uses.

    and then

    Yahoo! also reserves the right to require you to cease distributing these feeds at any time for any reason.

    So, while it's cool and all, is there any value to using their weather RSS feed (and I assume it's similar with other services), beyond my ability to play with them? I mean, even I'm not making any money off it, presumably, if I put the effort in accessing those feeds, I expect them to be available to me in the future? Or do they provide a paid-for version for this?

    • Yahoo! also reserves the right to require you to cease distributing these feeds at any time for any reason.

      So, while it's cool and all, is there any value to using their weather RSS feed (and I assume it's similar with other services), beyond my ability to play with them? I mean, even I'm not making any money off it, presumably, if I put the effort in accessing those feeds, I expect them to be available to me in the future? Or do they provide a paid-for version for this?

      I would imagine that its just

    • by 0racle (667029) on Wednesday August 09, 2006 @11:59AM (#15874835)
      I expect them to be available to me in the future
      Why? It's their service, they could stop it or move it to a pay service at any time. Guess what, anyone providing a free service could do that even (gasp) Google. They could make GMail a pay service tomorrow if they felt like it.

      Your expectations seem to be ever so slightly unrealistic.
      • I didn't say anywhere I want them to provide their service to me for free. If it makes it easier to understand, assume I'm willing to pay money to subscribe to this service in exchange to the guarantee that it would be available to me for a year. Can I do that? Or all they provide is the free version that they can discontinue at any time for any reason?
  • by masklinn (823351) <slashdot.org @ m a s k l i nn.net> on Wednesday August 09, 2006 @12:20PM (#15875030)

    Not only did they release a nice guide, but the guide is actually good: while the first XML library they talk about in XML parsing is xml.dom.minidom, they also explain how to use the XML API with effbot's ElementTree (and link to both ElementTree and cElementTree), which is more than likely the best Python XML library. And the recommend UFP (Universal Feed Parser) for RSS parsing.

    The worst thing you can say about them is that they did their homework, kudos to the Yahoo guys.

  • I'm just glad they did this ahead of any Ruby foray. Online, all I hear anymore is loud rowdy Ruby peope and anti-Python people, some of whom are the same. At the bookstore, I easily see two times more Python books than Ruby. This tells me that despite the online hype, there's still a lot of quiet interest in Python and it isn't that Ruby or anything else is pushing us aside, it's that we're not very vociferous.

    Which is fine with me. As long as Yahoo and other outlets keep that in mind that is. Python is no
    • Ruby on Rails is only at v1.1. Thus the lack of books. When browsing Amazon however it seems like there are several scheduled to be released this fall.
    • Python is used commercially all over the place. My friend bought Civilization IV, and I was astounded to see it supports game modifications via Python. Meanwhile, I read an interview with the guy behind PyQt, the Python bindings for Trolltech's Qt library, and he said he has over 200 commercial users - including Disney, Pixar, and Industrial Light and Magic. All of these companies use Python and Qt, an extremely powerful app development environment if I've ever seen one. It seems like a natural match.

      So the
    • No doubt there's still a lot of room for Python, but since you brought up the bookstore metric: http://radar.oreilly.com/archives/2005/12/ruby_boo k_sales_surpass_python.html [oreilly.com]
      • In the interest of being fair, Ruby is the current hype language and hasn't had much in the way of books until recently, of course book sales are going to be way up. I would expect them to die down a bit as the language reaches whatever natural saturation level it is going to hit.

        I also am having a hard time recalling any good OReilly Python books that came out recently. That may have something to do with this as well.

  • Its sort of ironic that Guido van Rossum, the creator of Python, now works at Yahoo's competitor (Google) [slashdot.org].
  • This page mainly demonstrates how to take advantage of Yahoo's APIs with Python. I think that the engineers and managers at Yahoo must be paying attention to the competative edge in productivity that Python can offer. It really is an all purpose programming tool that works well in many niches.

Trying to be happy is like trying to build a machine for which the only specification is that it should run noiselessly.

Working...