Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Sprint Rolls out WiMAX Access 156 156

Tokin84 writes "Today, Sprint announced that it would pour over $4.5Bn into a 2.5Ghz WiMAX system to be rolled out across the country. From the article: 'Sprint Nextel, the nation's largest holder of radio spectrum in the precious 2.5 GHz band, has reportedly chosen to deploy Worldwide Interoperability of Microwave Access (WiMAX) as the foundation of its technology platform for the carrier's mobile broadband Next-Generation Network (NGN) build-out.'"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Sprint Rolls out WiMAX Access

Comments Filter:
  • Here's an idea... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by HotNeedleOfInquiry (598897) on Tuesday August 08, 2006 @01:29PM (#15867819)
    How about fibre-to-the-curb or even better, to my demark point instead. Wireless is nice, but I spend 90% of my on-line time connected to a wire.
  • by zymano (581466) on Tuesday August 08, 2006 @01:33PM (#15867867)
    Buying up our spectrum like this installs a natural monopoly that is inefficient.

    A better system would be for public/gov to create a network of towers for wimax/wifi.

    I BETYA SPRINT WILL MAKE WIMAX REALLY AFFORDABLE FOR EVERYONE !!!!
    http://www.acmqueue.org/modules.php?name=Content&p a=showpage&pid=37 [acmqueue.org]
    http://www.greaterdemocracy.org/OpenSpectrumFAQ.ht ml [greaterdemocracy.org]
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_spectrum [wikipedia.org]
  • by Nos. (179609) <andrew.thekerrs@ca> on Tuesday August 08, 2006 @01:36PM (#15867894) Homepage
    Because its very expensive to do that. WiMax promises higher bandwidth and reliability without the costly infrastructure required for FTTH.
  • by ptbarnett (159784) on Tuesday August 08, 2006 @01:44PM (#15867962)
    How about fibre-to-the-curb or even better, to my demark point instead.

    I already have it [verizon.com]. 15 megabit/sec down, 2 megabit/sec up. Finally, I have true high-definition TV and static-free phones, as well.

    Of course, it depends on where you live. I was fortunate to be in one of the early deployment areas. However, the speed of the service depends on the competition. Where I live, 15/2 is the highest speed for a reasonable price. Elsewhere, people are getting 20/5 (or even higher) for a similar price.

    Once it's installed and configured correctly, it has been reliable. But, there have been administrative problems every step along the way.

  • Buying up our spectrum like this installs a natural monopoly that is inefficient. A better system would be for public/gov to create a network of towers for wimax/wifi.
    I'm all for the public, free use of the radio spectrum, but what makes you think that the government would do a better job? They're the ones who split up the spectrum in the first place.
  • by ackthpt (218170) * on Tuesday August 08, 2006 @01:46PM (#15867986) Homepage Journal

    A better system would be for public/gov to create a network of towers for wimax/wifi.


    You mean you don't see this as a salvo in the public/private WiFi battle?


    "Senator Claghorn here, and I most strenuously, I say strenuosly protest the people's tax dollars bein' spent competing with this fine company. I say we shut down the government funded public service and give the money back to the other porkbarrel projects it was so wrongly taken from. Now excuse me, I have a golf outting this afternoon with some fine corporate gentlemen."

  • Re:The Environment (Score:2, Insightful)

    by TimeTrav (460837) on Tuesday August 08, 2006 @01:51PM (#15868039)
    > I predict that by 2015, the typical summer temps on the equator will be 180F. They're already averaging about 140F and that's up from the relatively cool 95F they used to be back in the 70s. We've got a huge problem folks and WiMax is only going to make it worse. Stop them before it's too late.

    I rate this troll 9/10. Bravo.
  • by InfinityWpi (175421) on Tuesday August 08, 2006 @02:08PM (#15868207)
    Nothing has been 'rolled out' yet! It's been announced that they've decided to roll it out in the future. But is it not currently rolled out, nor is it in the process of rolling out. This is like going back in time a year and saying Vista has been rolled out...
  • by Zildy (32593) on Tuesday August 08, 2006 @02:26PM (#15868369)
    Who said headlines had to be truthful? Besides, I can't count the number of times /. headlines made it sound like something has already been done when the summary admits it's "being developed", "in the planning phase", "talked about".

    They do it for the clicks, man.

    Review the Temporal Guide to Slashdot Headline Reading:

    1. Present tense means wait a few years.
    2. Future tense means it'll never happen.
    3. Past tense means SlashBack.
  • by Jeff DeMaagd (2015) on Tuesday August 08, 2006 @02:40PM (#15868484) Homepage Journal
    I understand your concerns, but sorry, I don't see "the public" investing a $4.5B network and have a shot at making it effective, not in the US. Maybe the Fed or many of the states might spend $45B combined and still make it a worthless piece of trash. At least with WiMax, there can be competitors using other spectrum.

    WiFi is not good for connectivity, it is way too short-range, especially if one county needs 60,000 radios (like in the county Ann Arbor, MI is in) to make such a sufficient mesh to cover all the land area. That doesn't make for a good nationwide network, especially if you multiply that by 3,141 counties.

    Maybe WiMax won't really work, but I don't think WiFi is effective either. With WiMax, they can use a good amount of power, combine it with a bunch of sector antennas to divide the user base (like standard cell towers) so fewer towers can handle the same or more users.

    Personally, I'm skeptical of the "Open Spectrum" ideology. Maybe if they demonstrate or diagram the physics in actual implementation detail without handwaving arguments, I can consider it.
  • by drinkypoo (153816) <martin.espinoza@gmail.com> on Tuesday August 08, 2006 @03:26PM (#15868840) Homepage Journal
    yes, fiber is also shared with a bunch of households. Here are some things you probably didn't know about both fiber and coax; first, the fact that fiber is a loop, and well-shared. Second, that the cable network starts out as either fiber or HFC (hybrid fiber/coax) and only becomes coax on its way to your door. you do not have an unbroken line of coax leading to the cable co unless you're next door, and even that is doubtful.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 08, 2006 @03:42PM (#15868966)
    I'm all for the public, free use of the radio spectrum, but what makes you think that the government would do a better job?
     
    ...of conducting massive surveillance, logging and recording everything that passes thru a wireless network infrastructure if they build and run all the towers and backhauls.
  • by zogger (617870) on Tuesday August 08, 2006 @04:37PM (#15869440) Homepage Journal
    We got wireless wimax a la motorola canopy service and it's quite good-as long as it isn't heavy storming out, then it drops to dismal, so I have kept my landline and dialup connection as a backup. But seeing as how it has taken me since the mid 90s to now to get ANY broadband, I love it! It's a cinch that in areas not currently served by conventional broadband,(roughly still half or more the geographical area of the US) you are going to be waiting between a LONG time until never to have any of the big companies run you good copper or coax or fiber, so, wireless broadband is where it's at. So maybe sometime soon we'll have even more competition and prices will drop and speeds go up! I think a good rule of thumb is look to where satellite Tv is common-those are the areas probably not served by any broadband yet. It's a huge potential market out there, and wireless appears to be the only cost effective market solution. Satellite internet for the extreme boonies, small scale boonies wimax, every place else ya'all already got some choices most likely with wires or fiber or shortrange 802.11 stuff.
  • The FCC said no! (Score:2, Insightful)

    by bobs666 (146801) on Tuesday August 08, 2006 @06:19PM (#15870160)
    The FCC said no!

    All you got was a near useless low power set.

    In 1984 Apple Computer petitioned the FCC for what is alot like WiMAX,
    A 10k to 15k network adaptor.
    But AT&T and others sweet talked the FCC out of the deal.
    Since this would by pass the local telco monopoly.
    So now you are going to pay for your access to
    the airwaves, its a lot like paying for your freedom of speech.

    Sounds like its time to start dumping Tea in the harbor boys.

If at first you don't succeed, you must be a programmer.

Working...