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The Next Three Days are the x86 Days 589

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the those-are-the-days dept.
Pinky wrote in to note that "Today, tomorrow and the next day are the only days we'll get dates like this: 2/8/6 3/8/6 4/8/6 like the x86 computers :-)" And yes folks, in the August news cycle vortex, even this strikes my fancy. In recent years we've seen numerical giants like 3/1/4, 6/6/6 and 1/2/3, but now really, what do any of us have to look forward to? Is our future dull and meaningless without cool numbers in dates? Oh the humanity of it all ...
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The Next Three Days are the x86 Days

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  • by metasecure (946666) * on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:21AM (#15831195)
    In Canada, where m/d/y is more common we already experienced this on February 8, March 8 and April 8, respectively.

    Life is good living three steps ahead of the taco.

    Personally I look forward to the lucky 7's, 7/7/7, a day where CmdrTaco and I can celebrate our slot machine winnings together.
    • But would you rather a three-day celebratory holiday, or three one-dayers? :o
      • I don't think celebrating either will get me any action so...a moot point indeed =)
    • by Moby Cock (771358) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:29AM (#15831274) Homepage
      I've lived in Canada my entire life, and everyone I know uses dd/mm/yy.

      In fact, I recall being taught to do it that way in grade 2.
      • by cayenne8 (626475) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:34AM (#15831316) Homepage Journal
        " I've lived in Canada my entire life, and everyone I know uses dd/mm/yy."

        Ok...guess it is early...I was wondering what the hell planet these posts were from...

        I looked at the date on my calendar and on my computer desktop, and it said 08/02/06...cobwebs cleared and I remembered that in other places, they switch the day and month around.

        Just curious...how many places do it d/m/y vs. m/d/y. I'd never seen the d/m/y thing till a couple of years ago....

        • by Red Alastor (742410) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:38AM (#15831355)
          Just curious...how many places do it d/m/y vs. m/d/y. I'd never seen the d/m/y thing till a couple of years ago....
          Every place that speaks French use d/m/y. It's because it's the way it's naturally spoken in French : 2 août 2006.
          • by sholden (12227) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @10:08AM (#15831613) Homepage
            Every place that speaks English does too, except the USA (and a handful of Pacific nations who caught it from the US).
            • I've wondered if this is because in other languages...they often put the description after the object. For example, in English you'd day 'red car'. In Spanish, it would be 'Coche rojo'...which is basically 'car red'.

              I wonder if this might be similar to how we speak the dates differently. 22nd is the day...and the month is synonymous to the descriptive part of the date?

              Sounds strange, but, was just trying to figure out why the difference. In Europe, the English speaking nations are close together with nati


        • just curious...how many places do it d/m/y vs. m/d/y. I'd never seen the d/m/y thing till a couple of years ago....
          Most places follow dd/mm/yy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DD-MM-YY>. Only places with USA influence follow the mm/dd/yy format. India for example uses dd/mm/yy. And yes, if you did not know this until a couple of years ago, i am shocked. In India, they taught us this when we were kids in school.
          • Australia / New Zealand uses dd/mm/yy. Always got me, why America and other countries use mm/dd/yy. Why do you need to know the month first everytime you look at the date. Isn't the day of the month the most important thing you look at first, so it's written to the left first. Just seems logical, the day / month / then the year. It's in order :)
            • I imagine it's like the poster said above - in english, when you speak the date, you say, "It's August the 2nd, 2006." Thus, compressing it into a shorter format, you write 8/2/2006, or 8/2/06. I rarely see the year shortened to a single digit, tho... unless you're trying to get a story posted on /. ;)
            • by carnifex0 (120168) <carnifex@NosPAM.gmail.com> on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:56AM (#15831519) Homepage
              Maybe we should all use the "Official" ISO [w3.org] date format - YYYY-MM-DD and avoid confusion. I have a system that I administer that uses the ISO dates, and every single one of my users hates it.
        • Well, d/m/y is used in:
          - Lots of European countries.
          - Russia
          - Japan
          - China
          - South Korea ...
        • by yfkar (866011) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:47AM (#15831449)
          Dd/mm/yy seems to be far more common than mm/dd/yy.

          Here's a list [wikipedia.org] of used date formats in various countries. Looks like Canada has them all. ;)

          m/d/y (month, day, year) is used by:

          * Canada (Although most official documents use the y-m-d format, the m/d/y format is also understood due to influences from the United States.)
          * Federated States of Micronesia
          * Palau
          * Philippines (formerly d/m/y. May still be found in certain contexts)
          * United States (Although Independence Day is often referred to as "the Fourth of July.")

          • Here's a list of used date formats in various countries. Looks like Canada has them all. ;)

            And it looks like those blaming the USA for the nefarious spread of m/d/y have been shown to be wrong.

            Quite obviously, it's the blasted Federated States of Micronesia again, exerting their subtle yet vast power.
        • I prefer:

          2 Aug 2006
          2006 Aug 2
          2006-08-02

          The first 2 separate the numbers with letters, making it easier to read, and it's entirely unambiguous, at least to those who can read English.

          The last is better for sorting lists, and makes the most sense when you're dealing with a set of information that spans several years, making the year the most prominent.
        • by 1u3hr (530656) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @10:07AM (#15831605)
          Just curious...how many places do it d/m/y vs. m/d/y. I'd never seen the d/m/y thing till a couple of years ago....

          Basically, everywhere except the USA. You don't get out much do you?

          If you do plan on travelling, also note that in the rest of the world we use degrees Celsius for temperature -- 30 degrees is hot, not cold, so pack appropriately. But most surprising of all, not everyone in the world speaks English!

      • I was born, raised, and live in Canada, and I use mm/dd/yy. I have lived in the States, and most people there also use mm/dd/yy. Is dd/mm/yy a European thing? I thought they use yyyy-mm-dd. Who uses dd/mm/yy?
        • I know most people here (Sweden) who *must* use xx/xx/xx use dd/mm/yy.

          I don't see why we can't all just switch to YYYY-mm-dd. You can't confuse it with any existing format. It's logical (they all come in order). It keeps mm/dd/yy's only benefit (as far as I'm concerned; I don't see keeping the year at the back a benefit) by letting months come ahead of days. With AM/PM vs 24 hour, at least there's a valid argument in that people think "five in the afternoon", not "seventeen"; with YYYY-mm-dd there's no such
      • No kidding. This guy must of lived to close to the US border and was using their format. Remember the first time I crossed the border to legally buy beer in the US. The clerk looked at my ID and asked how I could have been born in the 13th month. I told her Canada has 13 months in its year as we have an extra month of winter :)
    • This is like the famous "interesting numbers" problem. If you stretch your interest far enough, you can't get away from them at this time of the millennium. Personally, I was a big fan of 8:02pm on February 20th, 2002 (20:02 20/02/2002), which is a pattern which won't repeat for another 106 years - and after that, not until CE 3003. Rarity is a good thing.
    • In all the sensible word, 'leet' day will be on the 13th of March, 2007.

      You would have had it on the 33rd of January or the 3rd of the 13th calendar month... -if- they existed.
  • by linvir (970218) * on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:21AM (#15831196)
    Behold:
    It's funny. Laugh.
    Stay your flamethrower, thou saucy fellow. Nay, let us instead rejoice in the most accurate story in the history of this fine website.
  • Holy crap! (Score:2, Offtopic)

    by Demon-Xanth (100910)
    This is either a very slow news day, or the OP is way too bored.
    • Welcome to August. The US Congress is out of session, grinding one of America's main news sources to a halt. France basically shuts down, and much of Europe follows its lead. August is vacation time, and nobody makes news, at least in the West.

      If it weren't for those hard-working Middle Easterners busily killing each other, the presses would have to shut down entirely.
  • by TobascoKid (82629) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:23AM (#15831214) Homepage
    "today, tomorrow and the next day are the only days we'll get dates like this: 2/8/6 3/8/6 4/8/6 like the x86 computers :-)"

    That all depends on your locale settings - other people had thier x86 days several months back
  • Saturday (Score:5, Funny)

    by The G (7787) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:24AM (#15831219)
    Instead of getting dates of their own, Saturday and subsequent days will be known as "Pentium", "Pentium II", "Pentium IV", "Pentium 5", "Pentium 6", and of course "Xeon".
  • ISO 8601 Please! (Score:2, Informative)

    by Optic (6803)
    Abolish weird date formats!

  • Get a life.
  • by A Dafa Disciple (876967) * on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:30AM (#15831279) Homepage
    "today, tomorrow and the next day are the only days we'll get dates like this: 2/8/6 3/8/6 4/8/6"

    Ummm... you mean this century right?

    I'm still surprised this made the front page. I mean, I'm a geek, but even I think this is lame.

  • by bcat24 (914105) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:32AM (#15831300) Homepage Journal
    The 80186 was also an Intel processor, wasn't it?
  • 3/14 of course
  • Really 5/8/6 and 6/8/6 should be there, they were the designations on some of the "other brand" (then, amd and cyrix) CPUs, of course 8/08/6 should be noted too as should the year 4004... will anyone remember a humble lil adding machine then?
  • Never mind 3/8/6, I'm still baked from celebrating 4/2/0 !
  • by Snowcap557 (883211) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:42AM (#15831396)
    I still remember 12:34 pm on May 6, 1978 as the best such thing of all time. It was 1234 on 5/6/78!
  • Except that tomorrow is 2006-08-02, followed by 2006-08-03 and 2006-08-04.
  • Thank god for this newsitem. I had been wondering the past few weeks why I visit Slashdot anyway.
  • Today we celebrate the Brighton 826 MetroBus. [busphotos.co.uk]

    Yes, I realize it has the route number 273 on it, but really it is the 826!

    Let's all celebrate the wonders of mass transit!
  • by eno2001 (527078) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:50AM (#15831472) Homepage Journal
    The i586 DOES exist. Same as the i686. I don't care what Intel marketing pushed down people's throats, I still call them 586 and 686 systems. So does the Linux kernel...
  • It's all well and good people saying the correct date format is yyyy-mm-dd, but how do people actually pronounce it?

    I for one certainly don't say it's 2006, August the 2nd. I'd either say it's 2nd August 2006 or August 2nd 2006...
  • Oh dear (Score:2, Funny)

    by martinmarv (920771)
    It's sad that these are the only kind of dates we have to look forward to :o(
  • d/m/y? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Digital Vomit (891734) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @09:53AM (#15831493) Homepage Journal

    "today, tomorrow and the next day are the only days we'll get dates like this: 2/8/6 3/8/6 4/8/6 like the x86 computers :-)"

    Has Y2K taught you nothing? Using a single digit to store the year? You are among programmers! Hang your head in shame!

  • My father is especially proud to be a member of the Class of 1961. His class ring reads the same right-side-up or upside-down!

    The usual suspects [wikipedia.org] note that the condition won't happen again until the Year of our Lord 6009 (that is, if man is still alive, if woman can survive... [wikipedia.org]).
  • January 2nd, 2010 (01/02/2010) for Americans, February first for the rest of you. Last one was October 2, 2001 (10/02/2001) here - I threw a party (any excuse, really).
  • we can have 1/3/37

    heh.
  • March 10th (Score:3, Funny)

    by NekoXP (67564) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @10:09AM (#15831620) Homepage

    So okay, this is news?

    Every year March 10th comes around and we don't get a bunch of news posts from Nintendo fans because it's MAR10 day yet again.

    It can't be that slow on a Tuesday in August. What is the world coming to?
  • by DragonHawk (21256) on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @10:09AM (#15831628) Homepage Journal
    In a discussion involving both 3Com's 3C509 and 3C905 network cards, Donald Becker came up with this gem:

    "3Com only purchased rights to the numbers '3' '5' and '9'. Intel
    owns '4', '8', '6', and '2'. '0' and '1' are still in the public
    domain.
    "

  • by Asprin (545477) <gsarnold@REDHATyahoo.com minus distro> on Wednesday August 02, 2006 @11:11AM (#15832204) Homepage Journal
    3/14/15 9:26:53

    Mmmmmm.... pi...

    See, there's still stuff to look forward to!

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