Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Western Digital WD5000KS Reviewed 32

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the bigger-places-to-put-stuff dept.
Spinnerbait writes "Hothardware has a review of the Western Digital WD5000KS, a member of Western Digital's Caviar SE16 family. It's a 500GB SATA 3Gb/s drive, features a 16MB cache and a 7200 RPM spindle speed. WD's Raptor line, with their 10k RPM spindle speed, may have won the overall 3.5" desktop HDD performance crown, but they don't win any capacity battles. That's where the WD5000KS comes in. Up against Seagate's finest, the Barracuda 7200.10, the half-terabyte WD5000 holds strong performance metrics."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Western Digital WD5000KS Reviewed

Comments Filter:
  • MB/s vs MBit/s (Score:3, Interesting)

    by pppppppman (986720) on Tuesday July 25, 2006 @02:13AM (#15774222)
    anyone know why the "Buffer To Host" speed is in MB/s when the "Buffer to Disk" speed is in MBit/s?
    • Re:MB/s vs MBit/s (Score:4, Informative)

      by vojtech (565680) <vojtech@suse.cz> on Tuesday July 25, 2006 @03:00AM (#15774336)
      The answer should be obvious: To get higher numbers.

      For "Buffer to Disk", there is significant overhead caused by encoding the data with error correcting codes, sectorization, etc. This can make it use 10-15 bits per byte, with the expected performance of a 748 Mbit/sec drive being around 60-70 megabytes per second at the beginning of the drive (where rotational density of bits is highest), with 30-40 megabytes per second at the end.

      For "Buffer to Host", MBytes/sec is the traditional measure. The overhead on SATA is better than traditional PATA (where for UDMA133 it's about 50%). The raw wire speed of SATA-II is 3.0 Gbit/sec, so advertising 300 Mbytes/sec is beyond realistic - even the theoretical maximum is probably less due to overhead. In benchmarks the drive achieves 180 Mbytes/sec buffered reads.
      • In benchmarks the drive achieves 180 Mbytes/sec buffered reads.

        That's especially true at home, where the average PC has a 32bit PCI slot with a 133 megabyte per second transfer rate [wikipedia.org]. It's nice how the G4 has a 64 bit PCI bus and that the industry is moving to PCI express, finally. Unless you have the controller built into the motherboard or have a real bus, you can't expect anthing better than 80MB/s.

        In the mean time, I'm happy with 80MB/s from a $40 used scsi card and equally cheap old scsi drives

        • Actually, most modern chipsets (nforce4 939, i875 iirc, i915/i925/etc) support 66mhz on most, if not all, of the standard PCI slots.. so they'll top out around 266mbytes/sec. I found a program that would tell me what speed the slot was running at, but I promptly lost it again. Reviews such as this one amuse me. Not that I'm a scsi bigot, but when you can get a 160gb 15krpm 1 year warranty OEM seagate scsi drive + used adaptec 29160 for about the same price as a raptor... and the scsi disk makes the ide disk
  • heatmeter? (Score:2, Funny)

    by pppppppman (986720)
    is getting a 9 on hothardware's heat meter a good or bad thing? Sounds terrible to me
  • by Black Parrot (19622) on Tuesday July 25, 2006 @03:02AM (#15774344)
    500GB is a lot of naughty pictures.
  • Other reviews (Score:3, Informative)

    by jarik2 (204706) on Tuesday July 25, 2006 @03:24AM (#15774408)
    This drive has also been reviewed by SilentPCReview [silentpcreview.com] for those of us, who are more interested in noise than in performance. Another 500 GB Caviar model, the WD5000YS, was covered by StorageReview [storagereview.com] -- IIRC, the differences between those two drives are in the firmware.
    • Holy freaking hell, I hadn't seen that one... a 500Gb drive equivalent to Samgung's Spinpoint P80 when idle... This is frightening, I fear I found the next drive that will go into my system...

      And it's beats the living crap out of the Spinpoint in seek noise... my god

    • Re:Other reviews (Score:3, Interesting)

      by joib (70841)
      AFAICS the WD5000YS tested by StorageReview, has a 5 year warranty, it's certified for RAID use, and has a 1.2 million hour MTBF at 100% duty cycle. And at least over here, it sells for the same price as the ordinary one, so IMHO the choice is pretty simple.
  • Most of you are probably familiar with Sandra's Drive Index rating...[so I won't bother to explain it]

    But actually, not all of us are. I'm ashamed to say I'm not. Please enlighten me. That's what I read reviews for.

Simplicity does not precede complexity, but follows it.

Working...