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Hong Kong Using Children to Hunt for Piracy 259

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the history-repeats-itself dept.
westcoaster004 writes to tell us that according to The New York Times the Hong Kong government will be using some 200,000 youths to scour the internet for piracy. Members of the Boy Scouts, Girl Guides, and nine other youth organizations will be drawn from with the first 1,600 being "sworn in" this Wednesday. From the article: "Tam Yiu-keung, the Hong Kong Excise and Customs Department's senior superintendent of customs for intellectual property investigations, said the program should not raise any concerns about privacy or the role of children in law enforcement. The youths will be visiting Internet discussion sites that are open to all, so the government program is no different than asking young people to tell the police if they see a crime while walking down the street, he said."
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Hong Kong Using Children to Hunt for Piracy

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  • by Lord Grey (463613) * on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @06:42PM (#15740123)
    From the article summary:
    The youths will be visiting Internet discussion sites that are open to all, so the government program is no different than asking young people to tell the police if they see a crime while walking down the street ....
    From the article:
    Starting this summer the Hong Kong government plans to have 200,000 youths search Internet discussion sites for illegal copies of copyrighted songs and movies, and report them to the authorities.
    Asking someone to report a crime they've happened to see is very different from asking them to actively search for a crime and report it. I would be pretty concerned if the government asked my son to explore dark alleys at 3am, just to figure out if drug deals are going on in that part of town. Asking children to do something like that is a form of indoctrination, making the implication that "ratting" to the government is grand thing to do. If the government needs help like this, they should offer up a bounty on the illegal material let some idle adults collect the prize.
    • Adults shouldn't have the amount of collective free time that children do. This is a way to capitalize (in a communist way) on an untapped pool of labor that the human rights people won't get upset about.
      • by post-tech-guy (975154) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @07:51PM (#15740430)
        Either communist or facist, either way it is a recipe for disaster. Remember the Hitler Youth, they were instructed to do similar actions with rating out people who didn't agree with the Third Reich
        • And, of course, don't forget the Spies from Orwell's 1984. The Party in the book encouraged children to spy on their parents, even while they were sleeping.

          Of course, China isn't trying to destroy the relationship between parents and their children, but they're certaintly being systematically used for espionage.
        • by ultranova (717540) on Wednesday July 19, 2006 @03:57AM (#15741696)

          Either communist or facist, either way it is a recipe for disaster. Remember the Hitler Youth, they were instructed to do similar actions with rating out people who didn't agree with the Third Reich

          Yeah, and let's not forget the East Germany snitch network [wikipedia.org].

          It's funny how copyright enforcement seems to create more and more such parallels, isn't it ? Kinda makes me wonder if we don't regard the Copyright Lobby in 50 years the same way we regard Nazi Party now.

          Yeah, copyright Nazi. Nazi copyright. Copyright mass murder Hitler Stalin terrorism evil RIAA MPAA DMCA DRM. Eat it up, googlebot :).

      • 1) Hong Kong (of China) is producing about 0% of quality games/movies/software
        2) Hong Kong is losing about 0% due to piracy each year?

        For some reason, however, HK wants 200,000 kiddies to start looking around the places that will introduce them to the underbelly of computing

        Now let me ask you, what would China want with some 200,000 script-kiddies?

        Considering that the US of A already has a computerized powergrid, huge internet backbone/banking systems/telephone/cellular networks/freaking traffic lights and
        • Re:The real reason (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Jeremi (14640) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @09:28PM (#15740814) Homepage
          Now let me ask you, what would China want with some 200,000 script-kiddies? Considering that the US of A already has a computerized powergrid, huge internet backbone/banking systems/telephone/cellular networks/freaking traffic lights and building ACs?


          Sorry, but that's really dumb, even for a conspiracy theory. If you were the Chinese government and wanted to hack in to American information infrastructure, you wouldn't hire 200,000 children, you'd hire 200 really bright graduate students, and have them write automated attack programs. Not hundreds of thousands of amateur volunteers who are (a) not going to be very effective, and (b) are going to be impossible to keep quiet about their activities.


          There's also the minor detail of China having the USA as their largest customer -- attacking the USA is hardly in their economic interest.

        • Re:The real reason (Score:3, Insightful)

          by ErikTheRed (162431)

          1) Hong Kong (of China) is producing about 0% of quality games/movies/software
          2) Hong Kong is losing about 0% due to piracy each year?

          Ahem... Hong Kong has made some damned good movies (including some [imdb.com] of [imdb.com] my [imdb.com] all-time [imdb.com] favorites [imdb.com]). And I'm sure they get pirated.

    • "Asking children to do something like that is a form of indoctrination, making the implication that "ratting" to the government is grand thing to do."

      Not a new idea (Hitler Youth, anyone?), but it seems our capacity for learning from history seems tied only to short-term memory.

      I think the "...asked my son to explore dark alleys at 3am, just to figure out if drug deals are going on ..." was a little overdone, but I do agree with you in principle.

      Face it, it is hard for the would be dictators/over-control ty
      • A bunch of little Pavlik Morozovs [cyberussr.com]:
        Pavlik Morozov, supposedly killed by "kulak" relatives for denouncing his father to Stalin's secret police (OGPU-NKVD), was adopted as a patron saint by the "Young Pioneers," the Soviet equivalent to the "Boy Scouts." His life exemplified the duty of all good Soviet citizens to become informers, even at the expense of family ties.
    • I would be pretty concerned if the government asked my son to explore dark alleys at 3am, just to figure out if drug deals are going on in that part of town.

      I think there's a wee bit of safety difference between exploring dark alleys at 3am and surfing the net.

      Asking children to do something like that is a form of indoctrination, making the implication that "ratting" to the government is grand thing to do.

      So you're saying that you'll teach your children to ignore any crimes they see and just bury

      • by Sage Gaspar (688563) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @08:01PM (#15740488)
        So you're saying that you'll teach your children to ignore any crimes they see and just bury their head in the sand? If they see a little old lady being beaten, they should just stay out of it and not "rat" to the government on the criminal? I'm sure your children will turn out to be fine citizens.

        So you're saying you'll teach your children to report every crime they see? Old lady jaywalker is SOOOOO busted.
        • How do you discriminate against some crimes but not others?

          And by the way, old lady jaywalker SHOULD be busted, for good reasons (although law enforcement will not likely lay a charge).  What would you choose, a warning from a police officer, or getting run into by a car?
          • by Sage Gaspar (688563) on Wednesday July 19, 2006 @01:58AM (#15741478)
            How do you discriminate against some crimes but not others?

            The same way I discriminate between anything else, common sense and my personal system of ethics. I obey laws when they're not too unreasonable. I agree with most of the regularly enforced laws in the U.S., hence me and a lot of other people in the same boat live here under a government that will enforce these laws and prevent other people from committing acts like rape, murder, theft, et al. Plus give us a fair shake if we're accused of any of that nasty stuff.

            We also have a police force to investigate these crimes. If we were to start telling little Johnny to keep on the lookout for nasty copyright infringers, we've just given him the go ahead for a witch hunt and breached another hole in the healthy distrust he should have for his government.

            Hell, the legal system already assigns different penalties to different crimes, ranking them by their severity. It's not really an astonishing idea.

            As for old lady jaywalker, there's some old ladies that shouldn't be crossing some streets. The laws exist so the police officers can stop them. The appropriate action for a strapping young lad that sees an elderly lady having trouble crossing the street, however, is to assist her, not to call the feds on her.
      • by S.P.B.Wylie (983357) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @08:16PM (#15740551)
        There is a difference between reporting a crime when you see it and hunting for it. You are making kids agents of the government to protect us. We are supposed to protect children, not the other way around. The big problem is that when you have children looking for crimes, they land in the environment of that crime, and from what I have heard about the sites that have piracy, that is not a safe place for children. So, in that manner, it is a lot like sending children down alleys to look for drug exchanges.

        Will you have children looking for online molesters soon? They are the most qualified to do so, even if it does put them in a dangerous situation.
        Think about it.
      • I think there's a wee bit of safety difference between exploring dark alleys at 3am and surfing the net.

        Physical safety, yes. However, there's a very real chance of getting used to being a spy, and that have the potential to lead to doing very nasty things indeed. Besides, once you'll get known as a snitch, who would want anything to do with you ?

        So you're saying that you'll teach your children to ignore any crimes they see and just bury their head in the sand? If they see a little old lady being bea

    • Darn it... Now my evil plan actually will be foiled by a 5-year-old [eviloverlord.com].

    • Considering the adult (as well as illegal) content openly displayed on such sites, this isn't an unreasonable metaphor.
    • Luckily, there is absolutely no comparison between someone asking your son to surf on the internet from the safety of his home and asking him to risk physical harm at the small hours of the morning. I think it'd be a better idea to stick with an "accidental is not the same as on purpose" analogy, which is more appropriate to your argument. For example, I'd be concerned if the government indoctrinated my son to go looking for trouble in a dark alleyway at 3am, rather than encouraging him to get home at a r
    • Reporting illegal activity is one aspect of being a good citizen. Being willing to support law enforcement is another aspect. And this is hardly like walking down a dark alley at 3am. Risks to the child are nil.
      • It is what the government in East Germany used to say. I think it is a similar motto in Fidel Castro's Cuba ot in North Korea.

        Very good citizens there, I tell ya.
    • Asking children to do something like that is a form of indoctrination,

      Asking children to this is cheap labour, any other country would be ashamed to admit drafting so much child labour but China seems proud of the idea. These children should be encouraged to focus on their school work rather than scouring the internet for music and probably looking at lots porn while they are at it because that is what funds the warez sites.
    • This is *China.* They have been indoctrinating people and telling them ratting to The Party on their neighbors is grand since 1949. This is nothing new.
    • Where have I seen this before? Oh yes, now I remember.

      It was called "The Hitler Youth"
  • by GmAz (916505) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @06:44PM (#15740131) Journal
    Why do they think its so difficult. Go to google.com and search for Warez.
    • by timeOday (582209) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @06:47PM (#15740151)
      I don't think the main point is to find the Warez, but rather to "educate" the children by enlisting them in the battle.
      • Re:Its not that hard (Score:5, Informative)

        by cdrudge (68377) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @07:24PM (#15740319) Homepage
        "Here you go kids, this is how you can find/download the latest app/song/video."

        It's kind of like education kids about drugs by showing them where to buy all the ingredients to make meth...
        • Hrm. How about if they just told kids what the byproducts of meth production looked like and asked them to keep their eyes open whilst biking around the neighboorhood and to call the police if the happened to see them? Would something like that be considered facist and/or some slippery slope that gets kids down the path of turning in anyone for anything the state deems illegal?
        • It's kind of like education kids about drugs by showing them where to buy all the ingredients to make meth...

          That would be Walmart. No joke, they've got it all.
      • I don't think the main point is to find the Warez, but rather to "educate" the children by enlisting them in the battle.

        I think this is quite right. Interestingly enough, I'm sure the local law enforcement is turning a blind eye to the illegal Versace and Gucci knockoffs in the local night market. I have forgotten the name of the street since it's been 9 years since I was in Hong Kong, but there's a famous night market on some street that is notorious for selling counterfeit goods. I bought what I'm su
    • Why do they think its so difficult. Go to google.com and search for Warez.

      Why did this get modded "funny"? I'd almost call it obvious, but not really all that funny, just a fact. "Insightful", if anything.

      Seriously, finding pirated material takes so little effort even a child could do it - As Hong Kong apparently intends to demonstrate. Just search Google for "[warez/appz/gamez/serialz/keygen]" AND "[name of product]" and then filter through the literally thousands of hits until you find something p
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @06:45PM (#15740137)

    to see porn and all its flavors, casiono/poker scams, spyware, popups, circle jerks, top20 gateways and all the other scum that floats on the bottom of the warez scene

  • Bad idea (Score:5, Insightful)

    by frosty_tsm (933163) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @06:46PM (#15740146)
    The first problem with this that comes to mind is that there are a lot of piracy websites that have images unappropriate for kids.

    Yes, yes, I know that any kid can go online and find whatever they want to look at. I'm getting at that maybe this isn't a task for children (in the government-run sense).
  • by StikyPad (445176) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @06:47PM (#15740149) Homepage
    In my day, we used Pirates to hunt for children.

    Yarrr!
  • by smellsofbikes (890263) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @06:48PM (#15740154) Journal
    Sending oodles of kids out looking for music-sharing sites is kind of like sending angry, unattractive, middle-aged cops to "stop" prostitution. I imagine these kids sticking USB thumbdrives in their cop computers and bookmarking wildly for the evening's Internet Cafe feeding frenzy.
  • Oboy! (Score:5, Funny)

    by ackthpt (218170) * on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @06:50PM (#15740163) Homepage Journal

    Anti-Piracy Merit Badges!

    To earn one you must:

    • Identify a pirated song
    • Identify a pirated video or film
    • Turn in a friend or family member
    • Be able to recite from memory the RIAA & MPAA oaths of Allegiance to Lucre

    Breaking news: Chairman Moa is doing 3,500 RPM in his grave.

    • Re:Oboy! (Score:2, Insightful)

      by RobertLTux (260313)
      Breaking news: Chairman Moa is doing 3,500 RPM in his grave.

      and in other news Chairman Mao is doing 75,00RPM in his urn.
      • Breaking news: Chairman Moa is doing 3,500 RPM in his grave.

        and in other news Chairman Mao is doing 75,00RPM in his urn.

        Just attach wires and magnets and you have the energy crisis solved ;). Urns make nice portable generators, too...

        And here I thought that various administrations were just incompetent, stupid and treacherous, but now I realize that they're just doing their part in developing alternative energy sources for the world after peak oil !

    • the merit batch comes with an E.U.L.A. that makes it measure as a 3' circle

      hard to stich that on your average girl scout/ boy scout uniform

      additionally, due to D.M.C.A. rules, each boyscout/ girlscout must get preapproval from 5 separate companies and 6 layers of lawyers before they are able to legally wear the merit badge

      and finally, anyone viewing the merit badge on the person of a boyscout/ girlscout must gain preapproval from the same companies/ lawyers or they are in violation of fair use of the merit
  • by RyoShin (610051) <tukaro@@@gmail...com> on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @06:53PM (#15740185) Homepage Journal
    Hong Kong: Aha! You people are pirating software and video games!
    Pirates: Aha! You are using child labor!
    Joe Everyday: Oh no, who should I hate more?
    RIAA/MPAA: The pirates, they're the worst kind of criminal!
    American Government: Think of the children!
    Joe Everyday: [glares] Not helping!

    And then Canada just kind of laughs and goes back to whatever its doing.
  • by grasshoppa (657393) <skennedy@@@tpno-co...org> on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @06:53PM (#15740188) Homepage
    First of all; Warez sites have porn. Not just a boob here and there either. Real live penetration. Often times, you have the weirdest fetish shit to deal with too.

    So let's dump that on 200k kids. Lovely.

    Second, kids are idiots. Truly, they are. I remember when I was a kid, I was an idiot. So now we are turning out 200k kids in to an enviroment ripe for molestation. And porn, lest we forget.

    This is a bad bad idea, no mater how you slice it.
  • by Gurp (7581) * <<glennp> <at> <null.net.nz>> on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @06:55PM (#15740195)
    Ok, so we're going to:

    1) Force children, who no doubt understand teh intarwebs better than those in charge of this, to swear that they will search out piracy
    2) Encourage said children and young adults to spend time searching for movies and warez
    3) Wait for the reports to roll in.

    Whoever thought this up is brilliant. This plan has no flaws. Why didn't my government think of this?
  • The lesson.... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by aiken_d (127097) <brooks@[ ]gentry.com ['tan' in gap]> on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @06:59PM (#15740222) Homepage
    So 1% of the kids will be all into it and be good citizens... and 99% of the kids will laugh at and mock that 1%.

    Great way to make piracy seem even more cool, and to make reporting piracy something that only losers do.

    -b
    • And I can tell you, this is the reality of how these kids are viewing it.

      Only the "uncool" and "morons" are actually signing up. In fact, even those that do sign up, are just all reporting the same websites to gain "credits", they are not actively doing anything.

      All the while, they are doing the searching on their pirated WinXP computers...
  • by 56ker (566853) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @06:59PM (#15740224) Homepage Journal
    The massive attempts (and manpower) China require to keep their Great Firewall of China up to date. Who knows if these "Youth Ambassadors" won't just have their task expanded to include reporting on objectionable material? After all currently Hong Kong isn't covered by the GFC.
  • a surge in enrollments, it would seem that the warez-hunters have found a sanctioned way to collect britney speers albums.

  • Isn't this against international child labor laws?
    What next, use real kids to push child p0rn rings?

    slippery slope!
    • Quite a few people have thrown out child labor comments but I'm struggling to see how this remotely applies. Children are not being employed or forced to work daily hours, this is a program within youth organizations that I assume are somewhat similar to Boy Scouts/Girl Scouts in the U.S. The groups here frequently take part in civic projects, including local law enforcement projects. This is not child labor, this is giving youth another way to take part in activities that demonstrate good citizenship.
  • Sounds familiar. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Jason9x19 (951533) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @07:11PM (#15740269)
    "With those children, he thought, that wretched woman must lead a life of terror. Another year, two years, and they would be watching her night and day for symptoms of unorthodoxy. Nearly all children nowadays were horrible. What was worst of all was that by means of such organizations as the Spies they were systematically turned into ungovernable little savages, and yet this produced in them no tendency whatever to rebel against the discipline of the Party. On the contrary, they adored the Party and everything connected with it. The songs, the processions, the banners, the hiking, the drilling with dummy rifles, the yelling of slogans, the worship of Big Brother -- it was all a sort of glorious game to them. All their ferocity was turned outwards, against the enemies of the State, against foreigners, traitors, saboteurs, thought-criminals. It was almost normal for people over thirty to be frightened of their own children. And with good reason, for hardly a week passed in which The Times did not carry a paragraph describing how some eavesdropping little sneak -- 'child hero' was the phrase generally used -- had overheard some compromising remark and denounced its parents to the Thought Police."
    • And you will now go to jail!. You reproduced part of a copyrighted work without giving credit to the authors! You will BUUUUUUURN!
      • by whitehatlurker (867714) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @07:47PM (#15740410) Journal
        'Who denounced you?' said Winston.

        'It was my little daughter,' said Jason9x19 with a sort of doleful pride. 'She listened at the keyhole. Heard what I was saying, and nipped off to the patrols the very next day. Pretty smart for a nipper of seven, eh? I don't bear her any grudge for it. In fact I'm proud of her. It shows I brought her up in the right spirit, anyway.'

        G Orwell [online-literature.com]

  • by SuperKendall (25149) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @07:11PM (#15740271)
    Here in America, we have millions of youths scouring the internet for piracy!

    However, we do outsource the collecton results in Sweden so I guess we can't take all the credit.

  • "Dob, dob, dob" indeed.
  • If they catch all of the pirates, Hong Kong could very well land themselves in some very hot water with the U.N. as this in no doubt aids in the proliferation [venganza.org] of global warming
  • After all the 700 pilot kids found 800 postings.....

    I wonder what the other 693 kids in pilot program where doing during this time? Or maybe it slows them up when they decide to d/l them all,hehe. It is either that or the pilot program only lasted 20 minutes before they implemented it full-scale ;P

    Program is available for export...i dare you to try that here...hehe they would probably download 1600 for every 800 found ;p

    ok, back to how sleezey this is.....
  • Boy Scouts? (Score:5, Funny)

    by k4_pacific (736911) <k4_pacific AT yahoo DOT com> on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @07:30PM (#15740333) Homepage Journal
    Redmond WA (Hydraulic Press) - The Business Software Alliance announced today a settlement agreement in their long running trademark dispute with the Boy Scouts of America. According to the terms of the agreement, the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) must use its swelling ranks to help the Business Software Alliance (BSA) sniff out piracy on the internet. Another controversial term of the settlement is the mandate that requirements for the Computing merit badge must be completed using only legitimately purchased Microsoft branded software.

    The dispute started in 1998, when the Business Software Alliance noticed that the Boy Scouts of America, a quasi-military organization headquartered in Irving, Texas, had the same three letter initials as them. They promptly sued for damages and infringement. While many legal scholars believed that the Scouts would prevail as they have existed for nearly a century, the Business Software Alliance won the case by throwing wave after wave of lawyers at them until the Scouts relented.

    "I cannot continue to sit back and allow the Boy Scouts to continue to sap and impurify all of our precious intellectual property," said a Business Software Alliance representative, "God willing, we will prevail, through the purity and essence of our trademarks and copyrights."

    Bob Talbee, a scoutmaster in Grand Rapids, Michigan, stated that he would cancel the weekend campout to comply with the order, "Sorry kids, we've got to spend the weekend on the internet looking for something or someone called warez," he announced at a recent Scout meeting. Talbee, a bricklayer by trade, was not sure what a warez is, but thought it sounded thoroughly unwholesome and worthwhile for the scouts to work towards eliminating.
  • Cmon Slashdot! On with the Peter Pan jokes!
  • by zerblat (785) <jonas@NoSPAM.skubic.se> on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @07:34PM (#15740351) Homepage
    So, basically, what we have here is children [wikipedia.org] fighting pirates [wikipedia.org] on an island [wikipedia.org]? Where have I heard that before?
  • Reminds me of (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @07:36PM (#15740359)
    Living in a post-communistic country, i remember from my schoolyears how we were 'trained' to look for and report saboteurs, spies and evil western agents. Given the state paranoia, the agents were portrayed as almost mythical creatures, with ninja-like capabilities, evil to the bone. The result was that everyone i know wanted to be western agent, so cool, merciless, almost invulnerable, able to get anywhere ...

    So .. way to go China! :)
  • by Simonetta (207550) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @08:02PM (#15740496)
    Since this is Hong Kong, one must wonder if they are looking for pirated materials in order to wipe out their competition, or are they looking for something new to pirate that hasn't as yet received wide exposure.

        The idea that the children of Hong Kong are being sent on a crusade to supplement the RIAA is absurd, and should not be taken on face value.

        Perhaps the Hong Kong politicians who have received gifts from the pirates along with honorariums (to cover expenses, of course) from the RIAA need to show everyone involved on both sides that they are making 'a sincere effort' to address the 'problem'.
    • Congratulations, first insightful post & I'm out of mod points.
      If they were serious about stopping piracy they'd just send the Police to three or four locations I've visited several times ;) let's just say Mong Kok and clean up an awful lot of piracy for relatively little outlay...
  • Do not be fooled! (Score:3, Insightful)

    by posterlogo (943853) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @08:15PM (#15740549)
    The article makes it sound like this is another communist China authoritarian/totalitarian scheme to use the people for state aims. Do not be fooled! This program is the brainchild of MPAA/RIAA. Why not do it domestically?

    FTA: "The program may work better here than it would elsewhere, local officials suggest. Hong Kong teenagers are surprisingly obedient, possibly because of a Confucian tradition and very strong social pressures to study hard and serve the community."

    That's right! Their kids are more brainwashed! Go MPAA/RIAA.

    • Re:Do not be fooled! (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Unlikely_Hero (900172) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @08:41PM (#15740645)
      I've said for ages that all this confuscian crap (yes crap) is the basic root of authoritarianism in asian cultures. And I'm always branded some sort of bigot.
      LOOK AT THE MAN'S WRITING. IT'S TRUE
  • by winkydink (650484) * <sv.dude@gmail.com> on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @08:34PM (#15740623) Homepage Journal
    The Rat Fink
  • by DJ_Perl (648258) on Tuesday July 18, 2006 @08:56PM (#15740704) Homepage
    200,000 youths?!?!! Depending on which source you believe, there are only about 1 million youths ( ages 9-25 ) in all of Hong Kong. Even the sources disagree on the exact demographics of Hong Kong. Total population estimates ballpark around 6.9million.

    That would mean that 1 in every 5 youths would have to become part of this program. Sounds....unlikely.

    Sources:

    1. Wikipedia (Demographics of Hong Kong) [wikipedia.org] - 6.9 million in 2003
    2. Wikipedia (Hong Kong) [wikipedia.org] - 6.86 million in 2005
    3. CIA World Factbook [cia.gov] - 6.94 million in July 2006
  • A simple formula.

    1 parts - Living Wage that provides a quality life, and covers all medical needs.
    2 parts - Lower Prices for software
    3 parts - Lower Prices for music
    4 parts - Lower Prices for movies

    Put them all together in a bowl, mix them up gently.

    • The problem is that "lower prices" just doesn't work, even though it is a nice idea.

      Today, in the marketplace of the Internet you have a real choice: pay or not. Period. You want a copy of Adobe Photoshop - you can pay any amount from $0 to $1000. You get to choose. The fact that some people will pay $1000 but most choose something less is a fact of life. Where the rubber meets the road is when everyone (or at least nearly everyone) chooses $0.

      This is where music in China has gone. Everyone chooses $0
  • Pirates search for children
  • by hachete (473378) on Wednesday July 19, 2006 @05:20AM (#15741923) Homepage Journal
    http://www.e-sheep.com/spiders/ [e-sheep.com]

    which is a damn fine webcomic as well

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