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The Man Behind MySpace 186

Posted by Zonk
from the hungry-like-dewolfe dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Guardian has an article looking at the life of Chris DeWolfe, a co-founder of the popular MySpace community site. The article details some of his previous work history, and the thought process that went into creating the site." From the article: "They pinched the best bits of everybody else's sites (Craigslist, Evite, MP3.com) and put them together in a manner that made sense. Unconcerned with technological bells and whistles and geeky one-upmanship, they instead set out to appeal to the people they knew and, beyond them, the youth tribes of middle America."
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The Man Behind MySpace

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  • by matt me (850665) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @11:37AM (#15656303)
    We want to know about Tom, the face of myspace.
  • by skitheboat (901329) * on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @11:39AM (#15656313) Homepage
    From the article: 'Perhaps the biggest threat to MySpace is the PR fallout over safety ... Those "challenges" are being met "head on", he says, including hiring extra staff to monitor the 4-5m photos uploaded every day'

    That job has to be about as exciting as watching grass grow [watching-grass-grow.com] but let assume you can sustain a review rate of one picture/second. In an 8 hour day, this is just under 30,000 pictures a day per employee. And to handle the 4-5 million/day, you'd therefore need about 200 employees (counting vacation and holidays) doing nothing but looking at MySpace pictures - yikes!
    • Peer Review (Score:5, Interesting)

      by therage96 (912259) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @11:49AM (#15656362)
      And that is where Peer Review comes into play. Obviously, the amount of images uploaded far outstrips their ability to monitor them. Thus, they most likely only focus on those pictures that have been reported to be inappropriate. They may also actively check the most popular profiles since an inappropriate picture on one of them would have the widest reaching impact.
      • Re:Peer Review (Score:3, Insightful)

        by tashanna (409911)

        I don't even think it'll take monitoring all the most popular profiles - look for sudden spikes in traffic to a profile or image. If it's a double-plus-ungood photo, it'll probably draw a crowd. It won't take long to rule out /. effect (heck, getting posted on slashdot may be a good indicator that its inappropriate) or a genuinely interesting/funny photo.

        - Tash
        Vrooom... [tashcorp.net]

      • They could also be using flesh-color detecting software.
    • I don't know if they monitor like that - though they may. However, I do know from the days in high school when I used it (now it just makes me barf) that they have a "report this image" link under every image. Still, I don't know how many teens are going to click the link for fear of selling out their friends.
    • by Anonymous Coward
      you can fit several pictures on a page at once, just a cursory scan is needed, and a click on the bad ones.
      then, you can probably strip out all the ones that dont have any reports on them..which is most i guess..

      but I agree, it'll get old FAST, if I can do it part time from home, where do I sign? ;)
      • Yeah, I can look at a whole screen of photos in less than a second. I might not catch all the details, but I'd recognize the obvious ones, the subtle ones might get through.

        But, as a parent, I wouldn't want any picture of my kid that was attached to name, address, or phone number. Not sure if MySpace can handle that requirement, so I guess it's my responsibility.
    • by WiggyWack (88258) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @01:56PM (#15656839) Homepage
      In an 8 hour day, this is just under 30,000 pictures a day per employee.

      I pretty much do this now in my free time. Might as well get paid for it...
    • You can review a lot more than one picture per second. A thumbnail page of 24 images can be reviewed in a few seconds at most. If something looks suspect, you can take a closer look. And people hired for the spot only need to enjoy the visual treasure hunt that results from finding all the ban-worthy pictures. Many people spend all day doing that for free. To each his own.

      -Restil
  • Sounds like (Score:4, Interesting)

    by drpimp (900837) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @11:42AM (#15656331) Journal
    They have alot planned. Now I wonder if they are going to change their website look. 3 years of the same plain, cluttered with tables, website. Yuck!. No wonder all the users sites look like Frontpage sites from the late 90's. Trying to style with

    table table table table tr td

    is always fun isn't it! And yes, who the F@#& is this DeWolfe guy, we want to hear about Tom!
    • Three years? That's nothing, Slashdot had the same plain design for like three times that.
    • I think he's the guy responsible for the code that runs like a pig on their IIS servers. I haven't been on there in almost a year, but I hope they've done something about their scalability problems with all that Murdoch money.
    • Could you imagine the uproar if they broke tens of millions people's profiles by switching to XHTML/CSS? I'd be in heaven (no more
      table table tr tr td td table tr tr td
      selectors!) but little Suzie with her pink-on-yellow profile would flip. And probably take it out on Tom.
    • From the summary, that doesn't seem like the type of thing they're concerned about.

      Unconcerned with technological bells and whistles and geeky one-upmanship...
  • by dominion (3153) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @11:43AM (#15656338) Homepage
    Unconcerned with technological bells and whistles and geeky one-upmanship ...or, y'know, testing their code or any kind of quality assurance.

    I continue to be amazed at the amount that Myspace.com breaks. Messaging will sometimes go down for weeks at a time. The "chat" feature has never really worked. Pages just randomly come up with errors. And not to mention the spam and the security errors. $586 million dollars, and they can't build a decent site?

    I guess that's what they get for creating a massive website using Coldfusion.
    • by Cid Highwind (9258) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @01:30PM (#15656752) Homepage
      Would you bother fixing bugs if someone just gave you $586 million for a bug-riddled pile of crap? I sure wouldn't. I suspect the QA process at myspace goes something like this...

      Minimum Wage Support Monkey: "Umm, sir, we're getting lots of bug reports from users. They say chat doesn't work, and some of their pages have been down since Thursday."

      Myspace Co-Owner: "Well, I'm busy drinking fine cognac and sailing my brand new 120ft yacht across the Pacific with a crew of 46 beautiful Thai girls right now. It'll have to wait until I get back sometime next year..."
      • Well, I'm busy drinking fine cognac and sailing my brand new 120ft yacht across the Pacific with a crew of 46 beautiful Thai girls right now. It'll have to wait until I get back sometime next year...

        Ah the trappings, glamour and luxury of having a massive internet penis^W^WMySpace friends list!
        • Piracy means copyright infringement, [tinyurl.com] and has done since the 1800s. Deal with it.

          Lol!

          1. Who the EFF ever heard of "Chambers Dictionary" as an authoritative source?
          2. On the "about us" section they claim to be a publisher, i.e. a company with a vested interest in slanting the debate.
          3. The etymology just says "16c" so where do you get this "1800s" bit from and how do you know it applies to copyrights rather than high seas?

          Not that I really care one way or the other, my favorite semantic argument is "theft vs copyrig

          • Who the EFF ever heard of "Chambers Dictionary" as an authoritative source?

            Actually, Chambers is a well known and respected dictionary; in fact, it's the official dictionary of Scrabble in the UK. As an aside, the life of Robert Chambers is quite interesting, not least for his authorship of "Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation". Well worth looking up.

            On the "about us" section they claim to be a publisher, i.e. a company with a vested interest in slanting the debate.

            Oh, please! It's a reference wo

    • "...they instead set out to appeal to the people they knew and, beyond them, the youth tribes of middle America."

      "Youth tribes of middle America?"

      I mean, I've heard Kansas is pretty f'ed up in some places, but have they really descended into tribal barbarism there, and if so, why are they posting crappy webpages?
  • myspace.com url (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @11:44AM (#15656340)
    The article says myspace was founded in September 2003, but the myspace.com url existed before then. Before it was converted to a social networking site, myspace.com was a free online storage site.
    • So they changed their business plan. Not too surprising. The initial big idea is not always the same idea that drives the business. You often need a spin to differentiate it from the rest of the competition. Going from a free online storage site to a social networking site isn't that much of a stretch.
  • by heinousjay (683506) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @11:47AM (#15656351) Journal
    They pinched the best bits of everybody else's sites and put them together in a manner that made sense.

    I'm going to send these guys a few pages out of the dictionary so they can start to figure out where they went wrong.
  • Proof (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Monoman (8745) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @11:49AM (#15656363) Homepage
    Myspace is just another proof that quality is always what is important.

    My impression after seeing Myspace for the first time was it was like the early days of web page design. The users were more atrracted to the cheap "gee whiz" stuff. Inline audio and video took the place of flashing/scrolling text and huge animated gifs.

    I have some friends that like to use Myspace so I check it out every once in a while. It is still a horrible site from a snobby tech geek point of view. To others, it is a great thing.

    • I meant to say "Myspace is just another proof that quality IS NOT always what is important."
    • Re:Proof (Score:3, Interesting)

      by courtarro (786894)
      You'd probably appreciate the MyUglySpace competition [zefrank.com] put on by Ze Frank. The goal of the competition is to create the ugliest possible MySpace page. Many of the entries are lame, but some are really pushing the envelope of CSS-based vomit. I just like the contest because it gave me a use for my MySpace account.
    • If the site provides a lot of people with a service they like, who are you to say it isn't quality?
  • by Hamster Lover (558288) * on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @11:52AM (#15656374) Journal
    I fucking hate Myspace. I am sorry, but everybody on the site seems to love to fuck with their background adding music, pictures and other bullshit making it first of all impossible view to their page correctly, and second the annoy the living hell out of you by playing the same music track continuously. Yes, I know you can "pause" the music, but so many people seem to fuck up their own pages that the text boxes are all screwed up and crap gets moved all over the page. A friend from college asked me join Myspace and hook up with him. I tried to add him as a friend, but his page formatting is whacked and I cannot find his contact box ANYWHERE on the page, so I just gave up.

    My friends on Livejournal don't have this stupid problem.
    • by cluke (30394) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @11:57AM (#15656390)
      Saw a good comment recently, that MySpace is nothing new, just Geocities 9 years on.
      • Consider how many Myspace users weren't born when the World Wide Web debuted (1989) and it's not surprising.

        I think Myspace will serve the same purpose as Geocities: get all the goofy gimmicky crap out of a future webmaster's system early so they develop decent content later. After all, they already teach PowerPoint in middle schools and I hope it does the same trick.
      • by Hamster Lover (558288) * on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @12:34PM (#15656560) Journal
        I am all for people experimenting with the web and making their Myspace page their own, but I assume that people would desire substance over style. If someone like me, a fairly experienced web and computer user, can't even navigate your Myspace page and complete a simple task like making a friends request what's the point in even having a page? It's the triumph of superficiality over usabilty and in that regard Myspace is far worse than any Geocities page ever was.

        I guess I can't blame Myspace completely for this phenomenon as it seems to be an attitude that is pervading our entire society: it's better to look good than actually be good. Mspace seems to reinforce that message.
        • I guess I can't blame Myspace completely for this phenomenon as it seems to be an attitude that is pervading our entire society: it's better to look good than actually be good. Mspace seems to reinforce that message.


          No it doesn't even look good. It's absolutely user UNFRIENDLY. OTOH, I'm still quite astounded of how many users and how active the users are in this myspace thing.

        • by apflwr3 (974301) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @05:45PM (#15657518)
          I guess I can't blame Myspace completely for this phenomenon as it seems to be an attitude that is pervading our entire society: it's better to look good than actually be good. Mspace seems to reinforce that message.

          Well, why do you think teens are flocking to it in droves? You think they care more about substance than style? They (and by "they", I don't mean Web 2.0 geeks, I mean the unwashed masses) love it because Myspace is the closest approximation we've seen yet of the (junior) high school experience. Mucking with layout with editors, tacking up animated GIFs and music bits is the not much different than putting stickers or writing band names all over their notebooks and lockers. Sure, it's clunky but isn't everything at that age?

          But the real genius of Myspace is the friends system. Friendster missed the mark by making it all-inclusive (if you're one person's friend, you're everyone's friend.) With Myspace, you have to actively collect them (or be so popular that people are asking you.) The friends system is not that much different than the little cliques that form in school-- and the ability to "deny" lets you deal out the sting of rejection with as much pain as in real life. And the "top 8" is like choosing who to sit with at the lunch table (forget the "interests" section, you can gather the most sense of who a person is by seeing who their best friends are.)

          Of course it's all very juvenile-- but it's for kids. And for adults who stil have that junior high mentality.
          • But the real genius of Myspace is the friends system. Friendster missed the mark by making it all-inclusive (if you're one person's friend, you're everyone's friend.) With Myspace, you have to actively collect them (or be so popular that people are asking you.

            Except not really. The whole "extended network" idea got screwed up as soon as Tom made himself everyone's friend by default. Then everyone on the site is "in your extended network."

            At this point, I honestly hope that banner just stays there and they d
          • Actually you just made a very keen observance when you say "you can gather the most sense of who a person is by seeing who their best friends are". This applies to people of all ages in all cultures. People will often pin you down with an inalterable first impression the second you walk in the room. Image, therefore, matters a LOT in the world of social dynamics -- of course you need to be a fun, charismatic person on the inside but without a favorable image you will be swimming upstream in their eyes. An
      • by Zphbeeblbrox (816582) <zaphar@gmail.com> on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @12:44PM (#15656590) Homepage
        Myspace is nothing like Geocities. Geocities let people design decent web sites. Myspace just forces people to use crappy web technology giving them no choice but to have crappy websites unless they send a significant portion of their life hacking the system. That comparison is an insult to geocities.
    • you know what i think? i'll tell ya what i think. i think this guy [ytmnd.com] is planning to go back to somewhere before 2003, and fucking-kill Chris DeWolfe.

      you heard it here first.

    • ...everybody on the site seems to love to fuck with their background adding music, pictures and other bullshit making it first of all impossible view to their page correctly, and second the annoy the living hell out of you by playing the same music track continuously.

      Sounds like just about every teenager's room. It's a well known fact that your taste is at its lowest point during that period of life. :)

      Heck, I could probably adapt your rant above to describe teenager appearance (silly colored hair, si

    • My friends on Livejournal don't have this stupid problem.

      Neither do my friends on MySpace.

      Solution? Uhhh. Don't be friends with fucking idiots?

  • FRIENDSTER! Well, the article mentions it in passing, but doesn't give it the credit it probably deserves.

    I first learned about social networking (SN) -- specifically Friendster -- from an NPR story. Checked it out, but didn't get an invite right away. However, discovered a slew of alternate SN sites -- Myspace among them. Thought it was a bit crude -- but didn't need an invite to join (IIRC) and you were immediately hooked into the entire network through our old friend Tom.

    And that, in a nutshell, is w
  • Bah! (Score:4, Funny)

    by Cleon (471197) <<moc.oohay> <ta> <24noelc>> on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @12:03PM (#15656429) Homepage
    My question for him would be:

    "Why on God's green Earth did you take circa-1994 web design philosophy and foist it upon the youth of the world? We got rid of that crap for a reason, you blithering twit!"
  • by TheSkepticalOptimist (898384) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @12:05PM (#15656438)
    "Unconcerned with technological bells and whistles and geeky one-upmanship"

    It doesn't take much to out do craigslist. I mean, even a CSS style sheet with a few lines could improve that website greatly. Good to see nobody is striving to outdo craigslist, we wouldn't want creativity and innovation running rampant on the web now, would we.

    -
    -
    Yeah, I know, mod me down. My Karma is good today.
  • Honestly, if you ever try browsing that site, with all the animations, videos, graphics, and assorted crap, those pages will bring your computer to an instant crawl, even a powerful one. Also, you'll get nonstop error messages no matter what you're trying to do. Technologically, Tom Anderson and Chris DeWolfe must have flunked Software Engineering 101.

    • "Technologically, Tom Anderson and Chris DeWolfe must have flunked Software Engineering 101."

      Just goes to show you don't have to get everything right to make it rich, just have to get enough of it right, at the right time. Look at that other big flunkout, Bill Gates, same thing, got enough of it right, at the right time.

      World is full of pedants and perfectionists that get 99% of what they do right, just not nearly enough of "what it takes" since they spend so much time on ultimately unimportant details, and
  • OMG (Score:5, Funny)

    by copponex (13876) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @12:16PM (#15656478) Homepage
    LOUD SHITTY MUSIC LOUD SHITTY MUSIC LOUD SHITTY MUSIC LOUD SHITTY MUSIC

    Welcome to the text edition of Myspace.

    Tranparent CSS with 80 layers makes it impossible to scroll down and turn off the sound of a teenage boy in women's pants getting kicked in the balls while screaming about the girl who left him after four days of romance. Pictures of people using oblique camera angles to disguise acne and general fugliness hover above links to people singing pop songs in front of their webcams, representing the extent of their creative ability.

    Enjoy your stay! Tell Rupert that 580 million was SO worth it.
  • by Infonaut (96956) <infonaut@gmail.com> on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @12:19PM (#15656492) Homepage Journal

    MySpace tapped into youth culture in a way that cannot be planned for or predicted. The technology was adequate, and the kids were apparently looking for something like MySpace. Don't be surprised if some new service displaces MySpace in a while. After all, youngins have fickle taste.

    • Among college aged kids, Facebook already is a lot more popular, at least from my experience, having just graduated from college.
      • Facebook had already been at my college for a while by the time I graduated two years ago, but in my experience it's nowhere near as popular as MySpace among people with an interest in music, design, and the arts. College kids I meet today still friend you on MySpace, but friend requests on Facebook are much rarer.

        At least here in New York. Maybe it's a regional thing?
      • Yup. Nearly all people I know fall into one of three categories:

        1) No membership on MySpace or Facebook - Most people who graduated college around the same time I did (or earlier) and didn't go to graduate school
        2) Membership on Facebook but not Myspace - A handful of college classmates, LOTS of friends that were approx. 2 years behind me or more in school
        3) Facebook and Myspace - Not many people in this category.

        I almost never go to Myspace because nearly every person's page there is so damn ugly. Fac
    • After all, youngins have fickle taste.
      Or rather; no taste.
    • MySpace tapped into youth culture in a way that cannot be planned for or predicted.

      In other words, it's a fad!
    • Or lack there of. The site is built on Cold Fusion, an out of date language, but hardware is where I'd be seriously curious to hear what they've been doing wrong and how Rupert Murdocks billions can't fix it?

      For all the tech jokes M/S does serve its purpose, it simple does it fairly incompetently. Name a single major site with such latency problems. If you in hte business of heavy traffic you'd better also be in the business of heavy hardware with big webfarms, fat pipes and geoloadbalancing ala google o
    • Don't be surprised if some new service displaces MySpace in a while.

      I wouldn't be, but Myspace is very flexible. You can make it into whatever you want it to be, in the long run, there is little reason for anyone to reject it. (Otherwise whatever site that comes along to replace it would have to offer something for people to jump to (other than...it's not Myspace.)

      Myspace does have the aggregate of users, but it's not hard for users to transition over--it's not like people have to buy both a VHS and a Beta
    • Lockin (Score:3, Interesting)

      by lavaface (685630)
      Youngins are extremely fickle but recreating friend lists, repopulating interests, etc. is a tedious and thankless process. People have too much invested in myspace. Now, if there was some type of myspace scraperbot that took your info and friends and ported that info into an open XML doc--that would be cool. I've wished for a while that there was some type of basic standard XML doctype for containing basic profile information and perhaps relationships as well. Then, in much the same way Flickr allows use o
  • by bluebox_rob (948307) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @12:24PM (#15656515)
    Those who obsess over whether MySpace can be profitable on its own terms may be missing the point ... it is already worth its weight in gold.

    I'm not an HTML expert or anything, but roughly how much does myspace.com weigh?
  • by tritone (189506) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @12:34PM (#15656558) Homepage
    Joy of Tech [geekculture.com]
  • by T_ConX (783573) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @12:52PM (#15656621)
    1) Pedo Probability Calculator
    PPC
    Tool which would calculate the chance of your new online friend being a Pedo! You would be able to mark real friends as ones you have met in Meatspace, and the PPC would calculate the odds on ones you haven't. Factors would include:
    -Few, or no people marking the profile as having been met in Meatspace. This one would be easy to get around by making multiple profiles, but improvements could be made.
    -How often their user photo turn up on other profiles, and other websites. (You know, how instead of using a real picture, Pedos will use a picture of some other girl they found online. Pedos aren't the only ones who do it. I don't know how many dating site profiles I've seen where the girl uses pictures of Keyra Agustina's butt and pretend's it's her own)

    2) Being able to view pages in Default layout, as opposed to the layouts choosen by the owner of the profile.
    Too many idiots think having using a picture of a car as their tile background is cool. Too many idiots pick fonts, sizes, and colors that make their pages unreadable without highlighting the text. Too many idiots have a thing for exclaimation mark strings so long that only a 3200 X 1800 resolution monitor could display them. Wouldn't it be great to just view thier pages without such silliness... who are we kidding... anyone who does do this probably has nothing useful to say anyway...

    3)Spelling and Grammar regulations.
    Internet Shorthand is acceptable in one place, and only one place. Online games. WHen you need to communicate fast, you can use as many commonly accepted acronyms as you want. When you have time to actually compose your thoughts, there is no excuse for typing like an idiot. If you've ever played Kingdom of Loathing, then you know they have people complete a simple english test before they let them into the chat-room. I say we do the same thing on mySpace!
    • Internet Shorthand is acceptable in one place, and only one place. Online games.
      MMORPGs are an exception to this. There's no easier way to get yourself kicked from a group (besides telling everyone else how to play their class).
  • "If you have 100 friends and 99 of them are on MySpace you can't just go over to another website and expect them all to follow."

    If that's correct, there's only one winner in this business. On the other hand, that sounds like the early days of e-mail, when MCImail and GEnie didn't interconnect. Does Myspace do things to make external links hard?

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @01:13PM (#15656686)
    I think we nerds, the whole world over, owe a debt of gratitude to this man, and here's why:

    He helped create a place on the 'Net, where all the clueless people can gather. They don't need to know anything at all about computers, and that's a GOOD thing: They'll stay in their MySpace corral, and think themselves elite. It's a self-reinforcing thing - the more idiots that gather on MySpace, the more inclined that ALL of them are to stay there.

    And the rest of us won't have to put up with them.
    THIS is a GOOD THING.

    We should rejoice, and be happy, that MySpace exists: It is a "pocket Universe" on the 'net, that draws in all the clueless.
  • They pinched the best bits of everybody else's sites (Craigslist, Evite, MP3.com)


    Comparing myspace to craigslist is a travesty of the highest order. Myspace has done to the Internet what AOL did to cyberspace many years ago: Provided the keys to the kingdom to the lowest common denominator in terms of technical savvy. Luckily, the mindless damage caused by myspace is restricted largely to myspace.com.
  • I have to admit that the blaring music videos and songs with which people fill up their Myspace pages almost made me leave the whole thing but Greasemonkey saved the day. Using a potent combination of scripts I no longer see any: - formatting - media - ads - annoying sections like "Cool Person of the Day" If someone wants to really push Greasemonkey into the limelight, I would suggest pointing out these scripts to the millions of Myspace users.
  • by applextrent (821630) on Tuesday July 04, 2006 @04:50PM (#15657366) Homepage
    I'm getting really tired of this PR stories DeWolfe and Anderson keep spinning. It is complete and total b.s. A little taste of truth about DeWolfe [trentl.com]. Once my next article hits the full truth will be known.
  • Keep your eye on People Aggregator [peopleaggregator.org] (you can give them your email for updateds) - it's going to be a sort of meta social networking tool, with the ability to create "ad hoc" networks of your own, as well as manage all of your other social networking (myspace, flickr, etc.).

    I think it's going to be the ultimate in social networking - one place to manage all your blogs and profiles.

    My hope is that the universality of this tool will eventually draw people off of myspace and into corporate-free networks of their
  • by brak512 (986882) on Wednesday July 05, 2006 @12:56AM (#15658456)
    [Tom] Anderson was in the creative department at Xdrive, in charge of advertisement design and later became an assistant in DeWolfe's marketing department. According to sources, while at Xdrive, Anderson rarely showered, spent an unusually high amount of time with DeWolfe, and took the bus everywhere despite the rumor that he was making an additional $5,000 a month from running a pornography website. However, no proof the porn website could be found. Most of this can be confirmed in a recent interview with Anderson on an LA radio station Indie 103.1. This article has some interesting information about both Tom and Chris DeWolfe. http://www.trentl.com/?name=News&file=article&sid= 50 [trentl.com]
  • ... actually good? When I sent in a complaint because the music players within the site didn't work in Opera 9 - they fixed it within a day or two.

    The usual response I get from sites which have issues with Opera is "well, don't only, like, two percent of the population use Opera? lol, no point then!". Yes, Lionhead, fuck your forum.
    • ... actually good?

      I suspect it's just you...

      I had a MySpace page for a while: a band page, with uploaded music, album shots, stuff like that.

      One day, it just vanished: deleted, removed.

      I emailed MySpace support asking what had happened: robot reply, telling me what to do if I'd forgotten my password.

      I emailed them again: robot reply, telling me what to do if I wanted to delete my account.

      I emailed them again: robot reply, claiming that, if the account was removed, it was for violation of terms a

  • MySpace And BBSs (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Pax00 (266436)
    The one thing that I see that myspace has brought back to us is a sense of community.

    When I started getting on the internet I felt completely alone. I saw almost no one then internet that I knew. On the BBSs there was a community. Myspace has brought that back for me. I use it to keep in touch with people that I know personally all over the world. It is nice having pics of their friends that they may talk about when we chat or talk on the phone or whatever.

    Also, it has really helped out with finding pe

It is the quality rather than the quantity that matters. - Lucius Annaeus Seneca (4 B.C. - A.D. 65)

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