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Things To Download 122

Posted by Hemos
from the it's-a-slow-slow-day dept.
I've taken the liberty of combining together a number of different submissions we've received. First off, Network Magic recently came out with a new version of their software (tour on link). It's Windows-based primarily, but having tested it out on Mac/Linux/Windows-mixed network, it's worth checking out. Another individual pointed out that SourceForge Enterprise is now a 15 seat free download; you can also grab the ISO in Torrent form. (SourceForge is made by the other arm of the company that owns Slashdot, VA Software). Lastly, a couple of folks seem to have rediscovered the joy of Audioscrobbler and sharing the stuff via last.fm. Fun stuff.
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Things To Download

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  • sourceforge? (Score:5, Informative)

    by doti (966971) on Monday July 03, 2006 @11:36AM (#15650310) Homepage
    bleargh!

    trac is much better. way cleaner and simpler interface, and _excelent_ integration with subversion.
    also, it's free.

    http://trac.edgewall.com/ [edgewall.com]
    • Re:sourceforge? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Super Dave Osbourne (688888) on Monday July 03, 2006 @11:43AM (#15650367)
      I agree, I wouldn't use anything else but TRAC, and nobody is going to try and upsell me when I use it. One thing that bothers me about posts like this one is I get the feeling it isn't just about what is available, but also someone has a vested interest in seeing this stuff pushed on the /. community.
      • TRAC's good, I'll agree. For single projects, at least.... TRAC's problem is that it's not great for more than one project.

        I've had better milage with tying Mantis in with Subversion, works well for large quantities of development projects. Okay there's no wiki included with such a setup but it's not hard to set one up. As always YMMV.

    • Re:sourceforge? (Score:1, Offtopic)

      by un1xl0ser (575642)
      How is this a troll?
      • Because "SourceForge is made by the other arm of the company that owns Slashdot, VA Software", I imagine. though it seems to me that no moderator could be sure that the poster didn't just really not like SourceForge.
    • Re:sourceforge? (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Blakey Rat (99501) on Monday July 03, 2006 @12:05PM (#15650541)
      Given, I haven't tried Sourceforge, but Trac is a HUGE pain to install. Mega-huge. In that the odds your server already has the dependencies taken care of are pretty much 0%. If I recall, it takes 4 different libraries (which have to be EXACT VERSIONS) or it won't do nothing.

      They really need to streamline the installation so the standard (say) Dreamhost domain can run it before they can take over a lot of this market.
      • Re:sourceforge? (Score:1, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward
        apt-get install trac
      • Given, I haven't tried Sourceforge, but Trac is a HUGE pain to install. Mega-huge. In that the odds your server already has the dependencies taken care of are pretty much 0%. If I recall, it takes 4 different libraries (which have to be EXACT VERSIONS) or it won't do nothing.

        They really need to streamline the installation so the standard (say) Dreamhost domain can run it before they can take over a lot of this market.


        #emerge trac

        Then do whatever configuration. Done.

        Another poster mentioned "app-get trac" (
      • I'm running the latest version of trac (manual download & install) supported by all it's libraries (apt-got)...

        That's on a server I have root access to though -- If you can't install the one or two packages it depends on via apt (eg, you aren't root) you need to build everythiong from python up for yourself :-/

        I do wonder why it isn't in the one-click install list though, surely it can't be that hard for DH to push the necessary support libraries to all their servers? As said, it's painless once the

      • # apt-get install trac
    • I too thinks that trac is a really great piece of software.
      However I have tried the sfee free edition a couple of weeks ago and I was quite impressed :
      • First it has nothing to do with the sourceforge that we are used to (heck it's even a Java application !). It is far more beautiful and seemed to allow a lot more of micromanagement of tasks/responsibilities/workload/etc. (not that I like that but it can appeal to its target market).
      • the integration of SVN (or CVS) is quite good with, like trac, linking of com
      • Re:sourceforge? (Score:3, Insightful)

        by masklinn (823351)

        heck it's even a Java application

        Is that supposed to be a good thing?

        • Java apps have a fraction of the operating costs of PHP, Python, Perl and Ruby apps. That's good for people who look at how operating budgets get spent, because they can then produce more bang for the buck.
          • Have you got data to back up this statement? I would be very interested to see a report on the operating costs of applications by development language/platform.
    • Re:sourceforge? (Score:3, Informative)

      by PietjeJantje (917584)
      Good point. Another one is that it is crippleware which should be avoided like a plaque. Really, which project of volunteers is gonna pay for this kind of software. Now I'm not gonna judge anyone's business model or deny anyone an income, but preferring to leech volunteers over making their offering, JUST LIKE ANYONE ELSE, an unlimited open source licenced download.

      One thing going for them is that with a 504MB download for what can't be more than a few MBs in code if you try really hard, surely pr0n is in

    • trac is much better...

      Except that Trac does something completely different from Sourceforge EE. I'm currently evaluating options for setting up a common "intra-Sourceforge" to cut academic application development costs, and SFEE is currently on the top of the list while Trac isn't on the list at all. Too bad that the sales people at SF don't seem to want our money at all, they don't seem to be very good at answering email.

      I'm of the opinion, though, that open sourcing SFEE would quadruple their sales pipel

  • by amanda-backup (982340) on Monday July 03, 2006 @11:37AM (#15650320) Homepage
    I would also recommend checking out the packaged Amanda backup software [zmanda.com] at:

    http://www.zmanda.com/downloads.html [zmanda.com]

  • Oglepoly. (Score:2, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward
    "Another individual pointed out that SourceForge Enterprise is now a 15 seat free download; you can also grab the ISO in Torrent form. (SourceForge is made by the other arm of the company that owns Slashdot, VA Software)"

    Two more and you'll be an octopus.
  • Submitter is a dolt... Audioscrobbler started off as a school project, but after a while, they went commercial, and are now last.fm.

    It's the same technology, it's just a new marketing name for it.

    • Audioscrobbler started off as a school project, but after a while, they went commercial, and are now last.fm.

      Last fm [www.last.fm] is a standalone player that implements the Audioscrobbler functionality. Audioscrobbler is STILL available in plugin form for Winamp [www.last.fm], iTunes [www.last.fm] and Windows Media Player [www.last.fm].

      Perhaps the submitter is a dolt but at least he read the fucking page.

      (Last fm == Standalone player) && (Audioscrobbler == plugin)

      LK
      • Comment is not very insightful, as it merely says the same exact thing as I was saying; the change is in marketing names, not anything else.

        Audioscrobbler effectively became last.fm (try going to ; it simply redirects to last.fm.

        So while the plugin is still called Audioscrobbler, it's not like it's a separate product; in fact, before the site and plugin used to be called Audioscrobbler, and now just the plugin is. But again, it's just a name change.

        I suppose you can say that when they went commercial,

        • Comment is not very insightful, as it merely says the same exact thing as I was saying; the change is in marketing names, not anything else.

          No, I didn't repeat you. You are incorrect. Last fm is a standalone player. Audioscrobbler is a plugin for myriad players.

          LK
          • Both are right in some way.

            Audioscrobbler and Last.fm have existed for quite some time. Last.fm is the "commercial" side of the company, while audioscrobbler was (as you state) the name of the plugin that lets you update your online profile.

            Now, they have been two very related things since the beggining, (when there was NOT a stand alone player).

            There was a time when the two pages where completely different. Now they are just the same.

            "last.fm" in a sense is nothing more than a name. The "stand alone player
          • No, Last.fm is a company and website.

            Last.fm Player is the player application that they produce.

            Audioscrobbler is the brains behind both the player and the website.

            They are all owned and developed by last.fm, and the last.fm website effectively subsumed the original Audioscrobbler site.

            Audioscrobbler wasn't always just the name of the plugin, it was the whole website and tracking system as well!

            Not exactly what you were saying.

  • Say it ain't so Joe! (Score:3, Interesting)

    by PhreakinPenguin (454482) * on Monday July 03, 2006 @11:48AM (#15650419) Homepage Journal
    Just out of curiousity, is this story a paid advertisement for specific software?
  • What's the point of "Network Magic"? Windows XP really couldn't make networking all that much easier.
    • Re:Network Magic? (Score:3, Interesting)

      by cfulmer (3166)
      In theory you're right. In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice they're different.

      I currently have three computers all running XP, all in the same workgroup and they can only access each other by IP address. It's a PITA to share files and printers. I'm very computer literate and could probably do some research to figure out what's going wrong. Iit's not exactly on the top of my list, and it might be worth the price for network magic to solve the problem for me.
      • Re:Network Magic? (Score:3, Informative)

        by MrNougat (927651)
        I currently have three computers all running XP, all in the same workgroup and they can only access each other by IP address.

        This is because NetBIOS browsing is (ahem) t3h suXX0r. It's never been dependable. If you want to browse by NetBIOS name (computername), you need to resolve that to an IP address. A WINS server can handle that for you. If you want to browse by hostname (FQDN), you'll need to resolve that to an IP address. An internal DNS server can handle that for you. But network browse lists o
        • I love it when, just occasionally, someone on /. actually gives up some useful information. It's a shame that posts like this that, although not directly related to the story or such, clearly deserve at least an extra +1 or +2 end up stuck at their starting score, whilst bad "does it run linux", chair-throwing and "I for one welcome our new [blah] overlords" re-hashes end up with +5's. /. moderation sucks.

          I Thank you, Mr. Nougat, for your post. I fear no one else will :P
    • Re:Network Magic? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Com2Kid (142006) <com2kidSPAMLESS@gmail.com> on Monday July 03, 2006 @12:28PM (#15650694) Homepage Journal
      Windows XP could make it WORK.

      Windows XP has horrible networking. If you are on Domain, you get to offload the pain to a domain admin (unless you ARE the domain admin...) but for workgroups, the suffering is all yours.

      Right now I have a network with the following characteristics:

      • Three machines
      • All machines have the same workgroup name and different IP addresses
      • All machines plugged in to the same hub.
      • All machines have a "shared items" folder that has been clicked on at listed as shared.
      • All machines have File Sharing enabled


      The current situation is this:

      Machine A can see Machine B, and can look at, upload to, and download from B's folders.

      Machine B CANNOT see Machine A at all.

      Machine B can see Machine C.

      Machine A can see Machine C.

      Machine C cannot see ANY machine.

      Another form:

      A-->B

      B-->C

      A-->C ....

      So to get a file from A to B or from B to A is easy, go to A, copy to or from B.

      Getting a file to C is also easy, just go to A or B and put the file on or take the file off of C.

      So technically I can "do" any possible transfer.

      Damned if it isn't STUPID and MESSED UP though.

      Oh and don't even go to printer sharing. The original idea was to have A act as a print server for B and C. Of course nobody can actually see A, so that didn't really go over that well.

      Mind you I have NEVER seen a Windows network setup as eloquently as a *nix network. On *nix, I just go to any machine and lo and behold, I can see every other machine on the network, use any printer, and if I login to multiple machines at the same time (most often using SSH) any changes I make to a file in my home directory on machine A is almost instantly transferred to ALL other machines that I am logged on to. This is incredibly convenient for testing network client/server apps.

      Windows, in comparison, has this entire synch on login/logoff thing going on, and the login process can take upwards of 2-3 minutes per machine! (Depending on the stupidity of how the domain was setup, some domains work better than others...)

      Now when it comes to network printing, Windows domains have got *nix beat.

      "Well what you do on *nix is you memorize the printers magic number, no, there is no searching GUI listing of printers setup, then you drop to the command line and pipe the file you want to print to the printer."

      Okay....

      Yes, I have seen *nix networks setup better than that, but I have encountered that level of stupidity too many times. Thankfully I have never needed to print a file with graphics in it (or any file that is not in plain text) on such a network!

      In conclusion, we, Computer Scientists, are complete and utter idiots who cannot program a decent system for the life of us.

      Something so simple, so very very simple....

      What the heck is wrong with us? It should NOT be complicated. I have had times where, when on a LAN, it was faster to BURN A CDR than to try and get networking up and running. Some times networking works, some times it doesn't. When it does, great, when it doesn't, oh well.

      Computers should not be non-deterministic.

      I really love those situations when two identical machines in identical states have the same operations applied to them in the same order, and two different results end up happening. That is cute folks, really cute[1].

      [1]By cute I mean "Somebody should be pounded in the head with a sledgehammer".
      • You left out Mac OS X, with it's Zero-Conf based system, which Just-Works(TM). Easiest system to network, I find OSX boxes are the most plug-n-play networking devices around.
      • Heh. Windows networking is, and always has been, a joke. The only really solid Windows networks I have ever seen are the virtual networks between my host OSes (Linux and OS X) and the Windows VMs.

        The strangest thing that has happened to me so far: Ever since the last reinstallation of my parents' Windows (on a clean hard drive, no less) NTLOGON refuses to accept any login from the network. No configuration issue, no nothing. All requests get denied with a "wrong password", even for the passwordless, permi
      • Now when it comes to network printing, Windows domains have got *nix beat.

        "Well what you do on *nix is you memorize the printers magic number, no, there is no searching GUI listing of printers setup, then you drop to the command line and pipe the file you want to print to the printer."

        That's weird. Last I checked, CUPS has automatic printer sharing (using UDP broadcast). When I set up a LaserJet on my sister's computer, it could instantaneously be used on all other computers on the same link (of cour

    • Re:Network Magic? (Score:2, Informative)

      by wiredpasture (975693)
      Just bought a new wireless router from D-Link and it came with Network Magic in the box. Nowhere, not anywhere, did it say the product was not neccessary for the network. Instructions were seamless in their incorporation of Network Magic. As I'm installing, it pops up with the "free trial" offer. I immediately uninstalled it and am fine using Windows XP on 3 PCs and a storage device. No problemo...except for the sneaky marketing.
    • Ah yes, the ease of sharing an internet connection using an IP other than 192.168.0.1. No to mention sharing it to two other NICs. I currently have 3 PCs in my home and I would really like to be able to use the second ethernet card, especially since all I want is getting the internet connection to the third PC.
      Unsurprisingly, getting that in Linux took me under a minute, gui-only. I don't want to sound like a linux fanboy, but Windows networking will never be really easy if anything but the basic features
  • A little context on why I might be interested in these programs would be nice.
  • Sourceforge (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Umbral Blot (737704) on Monday July 03, 2006 @11:53AM (#15650456) Homepage
    Here's something I never got: why isn't sourceforge free and open source itself? It seems like it should be.
    • Re:Sourceforge (Score:5, Informative)

      by tcopeland (32225) * <tom&thomasleecopeland,com> on Monday July 03, 2006 @11:56AM (#15650479) Homepage
      A fork of SourceForge - GForge [gforge.org] - is indeed free and open source. It's a bit painful to set up, but there are commercial support options [gforgegroup.com]. And there are lots of sites [gforge.org] out there that are using it...
      • The entire sourceforge/gforge paradigm is not that useful to people trying to install it in a company. In a company all development efforts are seen as parts of a whole so it's really important to have a big picture view of things. Sourceforge is about managing hundreds or thousands of unrelated projects by people who don't belong to the same organization.
    • Here's something I never got: why isn't sourceforge free and open source itself? It seems like it should be.
      They have operating costs, my guess is they have pay for this somehow, perhaps advertising isn't enough. (and the last i checked, VA Software definitely isn't the most profitable company out there)
    • Um, because money doesn't grow on trees?
      • Yes, exactly.

        Open [wired.com] Source [computerworld.co.nz] is [zdnet.co.uk] totally [eweek.com] unprofitable [arstechnica.com]
        • And how much of that profit would be left if they distributed the profits to the thousands of volunteers who actually slaved away coding the projects? It would certainly be an interesting result regardless of how it turns out.
           
          • It's probably not a result that would interest me.

            The volunteers aren't directly rewarded financially (as if that was our motivator!). I write software because I enjoy writing software (though I don't call my software "Open Source" - it's Free Software).

            Just because the relationship isn't directly finnacial doesn't mean that the relationship is exploitive (though some companies do actively exploit our communities - Microsoft and Apple in particular have used code without returning improvements).

            These
    • Better yet, does anybody know how much the enterprise edition costs past the 15th seat? The whole site seems to be designed to go around the price question...
  • Better for Slashdot. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by George Beech (870844) on Monday July 03, 2006 @11:56AM (#15650471)
    If you are as bored at work as I and havn't looked over the Top 100 Security Tools [sectools.org] your time will be much better spent with those downloads than these.

    o/t: Is this a porly concieved Slashvertisement???

  • by hackel (10452) on Monday July 03, 2006 @12:06PM (#15650549) Journal
    Um...and just WHY would anyone be interested in downloading any of this non-free garbage? Especially Sourceforge. That was one shameful decision. One shouldn't even consider using it over free projects like Savane [gna.org], GForge [nongnu.org], or as someone already mentioned, Trac [edgewall.com].

    This is Slashdot, after all, did we forget?

    Okay, sorry, Last.fm is kind of free, but still they need to restore the ability to play an mp3 stream with the player of your choice, not just their clunky custom software.
    • You still have to use their clunky custom software but you can stream their stream from their player to another player which accepts streaming mp3 audio. It's a roundabout way, but it lets you keep their minimally functional player minimized or on another desktop out of the way.
    • 1. Load clunky custom software
      2. Click wrench icon
      3. Click "Use external player"
      4. ???
      5. Profit!

      This is not perfect, of course, but it still gives you the Last.fm player's controls like "I love this song," "Ban this song from my personal radio station," and "Skip to the next song."
    • Um...and just WHY would anyone be interested in downloading any of this non-free garbage? Especially Sourceforge.

      Um... for support?

      This may not appeal to the hobbyist, but some people here are in the business of developing software.

      Paying a few hundred dollars per month so to have someone accountable for your support applications may work out to be a lot cheaper than spending your valuable time doing it, or hiring someone for that task.

      • Um... and open source software can't be supported by the company that wrote it? Or a third party support company?

        If anything, open source support should be cheaper for the customer due to FOSS support companies competing to support a variety of open products, rather than the customer getting stuck with a single vendor for each piece of proprietary software they buy.

        You seem to be under the illusion that all FOSS software is only suitable for hobbyists and won't work in a business because nobody will support
        • Um... and open source software can't be supported by the company that wrote it? Or a third party support company?

          Of course it can. Which is why, when making a purchasing decision for software, you need to consider _all_ the alternatives and pick whatever's best. Including both FOSS and commercial/proprietary stuff.

          Ideology should have, at best, a secondary place in the decision. I've seen as many companies get bogged down with open source stuff that was chosen for poor reasons (i.e. because it was free r
    • Um...and just WHY would anyone be interested in downloading any of this non-free garbage?
      This is Slashdot, after all, did we forget?

      I'll not mind pointers to any interesting program, "free" or "non-free," however you choose to define it.

      I haven't the faintest trace of ideological purity or political correctness when it comes to the use of my personal computer, which is why, I suppose, I am a likely candidate for migration to Vista.

      That said.

      I have been frustrated more than once in trying to find free

  • I think, Sourceforge should lower their prices, or provide an entry level product, rather than release for free.

    The On-Demand product is $100 per developer per month ( $50 for first project ).

    For the MicroISV type companies, the firms SF.net would appeal to most, that might be a bit steep. Especially compared to downloading the open source components and configuring them for themselves.

    How about a bare-bones offering for about $10-20 per developer per month, and charges additional based on usage?

  • by dohcvtec (461026)
    Give me a break... Slashdot is supposed to be News for Nerds, not News for Newbs.
  • Hamachi (Score:4, Interesting)

    by CoolVibe (11466) on Monday July 03, 2006 @12:28PM (#15650691) Journal
    Seriously, you guys should give Hamachi [hamachi.cc] a try. You can build LAN's over the internet with it in a reasonably secure manner. Great for multiplayer games. Also comes in a yummy Linux flavour.
    • Doesn't that use Routable but unused IP allocations? 5.0.x.x?
      • Re:Hamachi (Score:3, Interesting)

        by MacJedi (173)
        Doesn't that use Routable but unused IP allocations? 5.0.x.x?
        That's correct. It looks like it uses all of 5.x.x.x. In linux and Mac it achieves this through the tap/tun kernel module.
        • Soooo what happens when/if 5.x.x.x starts to get allocated and used?
          • Soooo what happens when/if 5.x.x.x starts to get allocated and used?

            Hamachi'd computers will not be able to communicate with 5.x.x.x I-net peers if Hamachi is running.
    • As a minor correction -- Hamachi builds VPNs, not LANs, and is damn good at it too.

      I thought that a zero-configuration VPN was too good to be true, but after successfully using it behind a few very restrictive firewalls, I'm willing to believe it's true. As a nice bonus, the security is very good. It's definitely the coolest bit of technology I've used this year.
  • I dont see anything about pron in that list. It must be a bad list.
  • ...do they run on BSD?
  • by Himring (646324)
    /. editor is going to clog the tubes with so many submissions at once....

    I have to say this to that senator btw: "you keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means...."

  • My system is 3 PC's all running XP, a Red-Hat Linux box, and a WiFi port. After F***ing around with Windows XP network, reading a lot of IT help sites on the subject, I got it to work.

    Then I went through auto-update land and it all came tumbling down. ^%%!!!!*****! (and then the "wizards" that "auto-muck" without checking if they have permission added in their damage) Attempts to re-configure and return to functionality failed. (Even did system restores on everything to back when it was all healthy and wor
  • .....but it sadly lacks a couple important features. We use HP Openview - Network Node Manager at work, and I've been looking for something similar (but simpler and cheaper) for SOHO use.

    If they could add adjustable polling intervals/schedules and (the single biggest ommision) notification on failure options (page, email, SMS, etc) it would be really useful for monitoring in small shops.

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