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China Getting 'Serious' About Spam? 157

Posted by timothy
from the will-believe-it-when-don't-see-it dept.
Ritz_Just_Ritz writes "Apparently, the Chinese MII (Ministry of Information) is going to crack down on Spam from within China. This will include training for 1000 mail administrators and recruitment of 20,000 'anti-spam volunteers.'"
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China Getting 'Serious' About Spam?

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  • by fullphaser (939696) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @12:58PM (#15583451) Homepage
    no need to click the link kids that it pretty much. anyway thank god... now about korea?
    • An insider at ISC said MII has set up a hotline at 01-12321 for spam-related tip-offs and is preparing to send out one million anti-spam notices.

      fighting spam with spam? :)
    • by Nadsat (652200) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:52PM (#15583829) Homepage
      Where's the rest of the article? It's so short. I feel like someone censored all the content....
  • by eldavojohn (898314) * <`eldavojohn' `at' `gmail.com'> on Thursday June 22, 2006 @12:59PM (#15583458) Journal
    I see this article was still in Chinese when I read it. Allow me to translate it into English:
    Ministry of Information Industry (MII), Internet Society of China (ISC) and China Communications Standards Association (CCSA) launched a national anti-spam campaign on June 21, reports Nanfang Daily.
    Translation: "The MII decided it was time to start a campaign that looks like it will help the people. The ISC & CCSA were informed of this decision."
    An insider at ISC said MII has set up a hotline at 01-12321 for spam-related tip-offs and is preparing to send out one million anti-spam notices.
    Translation: "The MII instructed the Nanfang Daily to print this. Like every other government controlled media outlet, the Nanfang Daily immediately complied. The MII has constructed methods for witch hunts and omitted the precise definition of 'spam' or what the criteria consists of. There are roughly one million people the MII doesn't really care for and they will receive notices informing them that they had better go underground or face prosecution without a trial."
    The report said that professional training will be offered for 1,000 email administrators and that 20,000 anti-spam volunteers will be recruited.
    Translation: "One thousand citizens will be trained to point the finger at anyone the government doesn't like using an ISP. This will prevent anyone from speculating that it is just one person or the government doing this. It will also aid in making this look like a benefit for the people. A lucky 20,000 other individuals will learn to play ball for the government and this will go on their permanent records--which might lead to good fortune."

    I'm going to take a stab in the dark and wager that SPAM simply means "e-mailing the way the government doesn't want you to" in Chinese. Whether that be based on the content or motive of your e-mails. The government seems to be implementing laws that have no clear definition in order to devise a method by which they can jail/fine/deter anyone they want. And it will most likely be met with synchronous thundering applause of one billion people clapping robotically togethor.

    Americans lose their freedoms in the name of fighting terrorism. Now the Chinese will lose their freedoms in the name of fighting SPAM. *sigh* Canada keeps looking warmer and warmer.
    • by pete6677 (681676) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:16PM (#15583550)
      Even if this is true, Chinese people have more freedom now than they did 20 years ago, and things will continue to progress in this direction. Government crackdows are getting harder to pull off, there is a lot of unpublished internal dissent, and the government is begging for a revolution if their response is to just crack down harder. Piss off 1 billion people alltogether, and its pretty hard to keep them contained.
      • Aw! How cute! An idealist!
        • I don't think it's idealistic, if the populace of a country is pissed off enough they'll just wipe the govt out. Propaganda and indoctrination are effective means to prevent people from ever getting pissed off enough. Offering distractions works well, too. More people care about the next round of Big Brother than the USAPATRIOT Act.
      • by Cedric Tsui (890887) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @02:15PM (#15583992)
        I agree with you.
        eldavojohn, I think you're pushing things a bit far. Everyone agrees that the chinese government is opressive. But this is not Orwell's 1984. The government provides stability, which was rarely present in chinese history. There is no mass shuffling of money from the poor to the rich, although there is increasing disparity these days as industrilization makes it harder to make a living in rural communities. The government really does put the well being of its people first. Ahead of their foreign reputation, which is why we all see them as the bad guys.

        I believe China will evolve into a democracy in its own time.
        • I love it!!!

          "The government really does put the well being of its people first. Ahead of their foreign reputation, which is why we all see them as the bad guys

          So that is why America hates China! They look after their people!

          This statement also holds true:
          "Everyone agrees that the AMERICAN government is opressive. But this is not Orwell's 1984. The government provides stability, which was rarely present in AMERICAN history. There is no mass shuffling of money from the poor to the rich, although there is
      • Given the vast resources available to those in power (information control and management as well as the very huge advances in lethal and non-lethal weapons technology (read: crowd control)) it's much easier these days for small numbers of people to control ever larger numbers of others than it was in the past.

        I guess the main weapon left to the masses is that of information dissemination, and the main limitation for advanced oppressive governments is limited prison space.

        Just my measly two cents.
      • But the goverment has become better at cracking down down early. If one guy opens mouth and instantly gets shot, you can bet that no one around him is going to be very enthusiastic about a revolution.
    • by iminplaya (723125) <iminplaya.gmail@com> on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:20PM (#15583572) Journal
      Canada keeps looking warmer and warmer.

      Yeah, well, wait till November rolls around. Then you'll be saying, "Screw this freedom crap. I'm goin' to Mexico."
    • I need to start posting Anti-American and Anti-Microsoft rants. My CARMA would go through the roof!
    • Canada keeps looking warmer and warmer. It must be all the strip mining of teh coal sands. That will keep us all nice and toasty.
    • by Moraelin (679338) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @02:38PM (#15584158) Journal
      May I point out that, although totalitarian regimes _do_ violate human rights and mis-use laws against dissidents, sometimes they actually have to solve an actual problem? E.g., even Stalin's USSR and Mao's China at their darkest hour, while they did have a some of the most brutal suppression of dissidents, they also had laws to deal with plain old crimes like theft, embezzlement, murder, etc. They also had plenty of civil laws too, like for example, divorces, inheritance, child support, etc.

      I.e., it seems to me pretty stupid to assume that any law in China is somehow _guaranteed_ be 100% for oppression purposes, and only disguised in a more propaganda-friendly guise. Maybe someone there genuinely got fed up with spam. Maybe a bunch of bosses in the PRC just had one day too many of finding their inboxes full of "H3rb@1 \/i@gr@" emails. Or maybe it was the "Thousands of 18 year old teens waiting for you!!!" mails. China's conservative leadership tends to take a very grim view of pornography, plus they have _much_ higher age of consent.

      Are those volunteers paid to either read other people's emails and to point fingers at demand? How do you know that? How do you know it's not just people paid to register email addresses and use them all over the place, and see what spam lands in those inboxes? Or maybe run honeypots to see who's actually commanding the army of spam-bots with Joe-job faked sender addresses? Or whatever? For the size of China 1000 admins and 20,000 volunteers is a spit in the ocean, if their goal was to read all emails. But to run a honeypot net or to get reliable reports of who's been spamming their inboxes, it may be just enough.

      Basically the D&D mentality that some people are by definition evil, hence they can only ever give evil laws, is so fucking stupid that it's not even funny. _Noone_ defines themselves as evil, sworn enemy of all goodness, and able to only ever do evil stuff, like in retarded D&D-type settings and cheap fantasy flicks. The Real Life isn't divided neatly like that.

      In RL even the most horrible dictator may really think they're only doing just what's good for their country (even if for everyone else it doesn't really count as good), and not just acting out of some Sith-like determination to extinguish all goodness. RL "evil" is more about not caring about collateral damage done than being some sworn destroyer of all that's still good and pure. And sometimes, even if by accident, their notion of "good" may actually be good.

      That's all I'm saying here too. Just assuming "The Chinese government is evil, hence any Chinese law _must_ be 100% for the sole purpose of crushing freedoms and harming people" is just bullshit. We just don't know that. Assuming you can "translate" like that, is just some self-righteous bullshit, nothing more.
      • May I point out that, although totalitarian regimes _do_ violate human rights and mis-use laws against dissidents, sometimes they actually have to solve an actual problem? E.g., even Stalin's USSR and Mao's China at their darkest hour, while they did have a some of the most brutal suppression of dissidents, they also had laws to deal with plain old crimes like theft, embezzlement, murder, etc.

        Except the differences between the penalties under the ordinary and 'political' laws in the USSR (and I am sure Ma

        • by Moraelin (679338)
          I must have been unclear. I'm not saying they weren't evil. Yes, they were evil.

          I'm just saying that even evil people sometimes do good things. It doesn't necessarily make them less evil, but it doesn't make the act automatically evil by association either.

          E.g., Al Capone on one hand ordered some brutal massacres, but on the other hand opened soup kitchens for the victims of the great depression and paid (out of that ill gotten money) for shelter and clothing for them. Was he evil? Yes. Were his soup kitche
      • Basically the D&D mentality that some people are by definition evil, hence they can only ever give evil laws, is so fucking stupid that it's not even funny.

        D&D? I thought it was a Republican thing.

  • by u16084 (832406) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:01PM (#15583466)
    Ministry of Information Industry (MII), Internet Society of China (ISC) and China Communications Standards Association (CCSA) launched a national anti-spam campaign on June 21, reports Nanfang Daily. An insider at ISC said MII has set up a hotline at 01-12321 for spam-related tip-offs and is preparing to send out one million anti-spam notices. The report said that professional training will be offered for 1,000 email administrators and that 20,000 anti-spam volunteers will be recruited. "is preparing to send out one million anti-spam notices" - Oh the irony.
    • So, will most of the analysis be done by Information Retrieval or Information Dispersal?

      Either way, Central Services will probably end up doing all the dirty work.

      My only suggestion: make sure they've filled out a 27b/6 form before you let them lay a finger your server. But then, I'm a bit of a stickler for paperwork.
  • by 77Punker (673758) <spencr04@3.14highpoint.edu minus pi> on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:01PM (#15583470)
    Where can I sign up? I wanna read people's mail!
    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:02PM (#15583475)
      www.nsa.gov/jobs
    • I wonder if they will let the volunteers attach the car batteries to the spammer's nuts. The "diehard" treatment seems to be a common "reprogramming" technique used by china. I'm pretty sure it will work on spammers as well as it does on the other chinese "troublemakers".
      • If you're not just making stuff up out of ignorance and actually heard that "troublemakers" are being tortured by having car batteries connected to their genitals, then it's obviously FUD. Human skin resistance is around 20KOhms. Car batteries are 12V. I=V/R. 12V/20000Ohms=0.0006A. Guess how much that hurts. Hell, given my choice of torture methods I'd gladly endure this one. Makes me wonder how much Chinese government horror stories is just propaganda.
        • Are you so confident of your math that you would try a live experiment? I know 1+1=2, but I'm not about to bet my sack on it!

          Also, I think attaching the jumper cables is a bit painful too. Besides, who are we to argue with chinese government officials. I am sure they are more versed in the latest methods of torture than we are.

  • Volunteers (Score:5, Funny)

    by JesseL (107722) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:02PM (#15583478) Homepage Journal
    Are these 'anti-spam volunteers' real volunteers, or are they volunteering-to-get-out-of-bayonette-testing volunteers?
    Just curious.
    • More likely they are just volunteering to avoid being charged with "Crimes Against China" for NOT volunteering.

      You've got to love the communist system of involuntary volunteering.
  • Wake me up (Score:4, Insightful)

    by hackstraw (262471) * on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:03PM (#15583483)

    when the get 'serious' about spam coming _outside_ of China!

    About 50% of my spam has url's resolving back to China or Korea.

  • "Spam" (Score:5, Insightful)

    by buxrule (970805) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:04PM (#15583487)
    With all the censoring China does, it sounds to me like it's just an excuse to hire 20000 people to read through everyone's email and make sure they're not discussing something they "shouldn't" be talking about.
    • With all the censoring China does, it sounds to me like it's just an excuse to hire 20000 people to read through everyone's email and make sure they're not discussing something they "shouldn't" be talking about.

      They need an excuse?
    • With all the censoring China does, it sounds to me like it's just an excuse to hire 20000 people to read through everyone's email and make sure they're not discussing something they "shouldn't" be talking about.

      You've got it the wrong way round. They're having trouble reading everybody's mail right now because of all the spam. They want to get rid of the spam so that their spies and censors stop trying to sneak penis enlargement devices onto their expense reports.
    • That's just stupid don't you think? Should have just make a big machine to handle that automatically
  • is preparing to send out one million anti-spam notices
  • when are we going to get Nigeria to crack down on those "wonderful opportunitys[sic]" involving "23 millions[sic] dollars"?

    The vast majority of my spam comes from US, or at least english speaking countries. When can we make some serious headway on fighting that?
    • The Nigerian Government has apparently already cracked down on the "wonderful opportunitys involving 23 millions". As a direct result, that balance has apparently grown to over "40 millions". Being a slacker, I dropped the ball and failed to collect. Maybe you can hold out for more.

      As for US sources... I guess existing law isn't enough because rather than criminal penalties, they are merely ignored or fined and sent on their way as their sponsors move to the next huckster.

      We know who most of these peopl
    • Most spams I received are aimed at US citizens. I live in Europe.

      Spammers are difficult to catch...Ok but you can catch their so called "sponsors" and break the business model.

      For example Mortgage...Sooner or later a real "brick & mortar" company has to appear. Money has to be borrowed from a registered company.

      A lot of SPAMs contain a US toll-free phone number. Why is it so difficult to find the owner/user?

      Cialis (unless they are fake)...I guess you can easily track their origin from the factory to th
      • Spammers are difficult to catch...Ok but you can catch their so called "sponsors" and break the business model.
        in principle yes, in practice there are a few complicating factors that mean this doesn't tend to happen.

        1: afaict the sponsors tend to by fly by night firms anyway and the spammers really don't care what happens to the clients once they have been paid.
        2: afaict spamming is in itself not illegal in the USA or most of the world, many methods spammers use are illegal (using hacked machines, forging s
  • US priorities (Score:4, Insightful)

    by electrosoccertux (874415) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:07PM (#15583503)
    I find it informing that our politicians are willing to sanction trade with Sweden because *our* (i.e. Not Their) laws say they are infringing on our IP. But we haven't heard anything of the sort in relation to China and Nigeria over spam (a much bigger problem).

    Regardless of whether or not we have a copy of a blank check signed by the RIAA to [insert politician here], this passive aggression our leaders are so fond of is very telling.
    • I find it informing that our politicians are willing to sanction trade with Sweden because *our* (i.e. Not Their) laws say they are infringing on our IP. But we haven't heard anything of the sort in relation to China and Nigeria over spam (a much bigger problem).

      Uh, duh. China has a huge market for US businesses and nukes. Nigeria has oil. What assests does Sweden have? (Besides ones that would make neo cons uncomfortable.)

  • > This will include training for 1000 mail administrators and recruitment of 20,000 'anti-spam volunteers.

    A little random number generation on the back end, and we're all good.

    550 - Stegospam hash recognized in message body. Thank you for your support of Falun Dafa. Use key responding with #48187 to access payment - U8FDO 4J7D3 5FLI0 0S5DX RTND6

    Let's put those 'volunteers' to good work.

  • by winkydink (650484) * <sv.dude@gmail.com> on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:08PM (#15583513) Homepage Journal
    Current estimates by Trend Micro show China responsible for over 14 billion spams per day.
  • I'll beleive Communist China is serious about stopping spammers when they start treating [religioustolerance.org] them like Falun Gong members. [wikipedia.org] You know, like imprisoning them in forced labor camps and working them to death. [faluninfo.net] Or maybe torturing them. [faluninfo.net] But until they're willing to treat spammers with the same harsh methods the Communist Party reserves for those trying to exercise freedom of religion, I doubt I'll see any reduction of spam in my mailbox.
  • by BlackCobra43 (596714) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:12PM (#15583528)
    Not in skill or particularity..just one in a million.
  • The Chinese government will eradicate these notorious spammers if they have to kick down every non-party-member door in Bejing!

    -Eric

  • by BriamKG (980939) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:17PM (#15583558)
    You can't solve all your problems with a great wall. Spam has been a problem for a long time, and it's one of those easily overcompensating balancing acts. Some services are overfiltering, and it's no surprise. There are all sorts of clever ways to try and sort things out, trying to recognize certain words or phrases or check to see if you know certain people, but in the end, there are always exceptions. What about that girl you met last night that really does work for the Mega Ab Destroyer 8000 Co? When it comes down to it, a fairly light filter that you check yourself, complemented with a whole lot of your own personal judgement tends to work. People need information about spamming techniques and what to watch out for, not just hard filtering.
  • FTA: ...hotline at 01-12321 for spam-related tip-offs and is preparing to send out one million anti-spam notices. The report said that professional training will be offered for 1,000 email administrators and that 20,000 anti-spam volunteers will be recruited

    This sounds a lot like their all-volunteer internet morality police at their universities and internet cafes. Self-proclaimed enforcers will tip off the authorities to something they don't like, maybe spam, maybe just free speech. The article doesn't

  • contacting chinese isp's and hosting companies to tell them that they're sending out spam, hosting malware, or other *bad stuff* is usually a waste of time... this effort could at very least provide anti-s people in the US and Europe with good contacts in china.
    • Some measures:

      * Forbid the use of users' own machines to send spam (aka blocking port 25).
      * Block open proxies
      * Forbid anonymity in name registries.
      * Clean infected computers regularly

      I'm sure it would be easy for the Chinese govt to implement these measures. I'm also sure that most of the SPAM sent through China is done via open proxies and botnets - not by the users themselves.
  • by MikeRT (947531) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:31PM (#15583655) Homepage
    Say what you will about the United States, but at least you can't say that we spend extreme percentages on our military while we have major internal problems. China wouldn't have anywhere near the problems it does today with crime and pollution if it didn't devote so many resources to its military. I get tired of the excuses for their priorities "oh they're afraid of the United States!" Bullshit. We can't even get riled up over Afghanistan, a country that aided and abetted the 9-11 terrorists and protected their ring leader. China would have to do something monstrous like conquer one of the "asian tigers" or Japan to get enough passion to actually fight them. You know what this just proves once again? Big government doesn't give a fuck about the common person unless they're revolting or about to. China's spam problems are only the tip of the iceberg. How about stopping all of those hack attacks against government and industry first? Priorities, priorities.
  • Too bad the "Volunteers" will be Falan Gong political prisoners, who "may" will get there havested organs back if they stop enough !!V1aGRa Get Moroe Penil Bigger!!
  • by Animats (122034) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:40PM (#15583715) Homepage
    Over at SpecialHam [specialham.com], the forum for bottom-feeder spammers, it seems to be business as usual today. No mention of any crackdown in China. Typical message: "Please give me ICQ UINs of poeple who make installations at trojaned computers. I need to install some software." There's some gloating over the collapse of BlueSecurity. Some new ways to spam Myspace. But no real concerns about enforcement today.
    • Specialhams' "please register or login" is done with Javascript...

      I turned Javascript off & was able to read away.
    • I turned off javascript and had a look there. Here's an intersting post there which is dead on topic:

      misluv

      Posts: 29

      Joined: 2/12/2006

      can i use .cn domains? got some chinese regisar who can provide .cn domains for about $3 each, i am not sure if they are bp domains but i think they should be, the question is , can i use those .cn domains? it is some chinese extension, ps: i would like those domains shown in my messenger.

      Perhaps that's one reason why we see so much "Chinese" spam trying to sell stu

  • 2+2 = ? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Frightening (976489)
    *Reads headline only*

    -A while back we were told Taiwan held the world cup for spam (small statue of a devil holding an envelope).

    -Now China wants to crack down on spam.

    -I see only one way they can do this, or am I terribly mistaken? (P.S Yes I am aware issue is cleared up in summary. Just laugh.)
    • I think I get it.

      Since

      -1) China takes great pains to make it obvious that they still consider Taiwan an integral part of their country.
      -2) Taiwan is arguably responsible for such a huge amount of SPAM that they are considered the world's biggest offender
      -3) China has finally decided to crack down on SPAM for real (or so they say).

      The only logical route to really crack down on SPAM will be to invade Taiwan, and make sure to put those shady list operators under lock and key.

      Q.E.D.

      We've seen
  • I'm sure the Chinese solutions to the spam problem will be top-notch. They'll go around looking for people who appear that they might be some kind of spammer, toss them into the back of a van, and then drive them to the re-education center where they'll have electric shocks applied to their privates until they confess. Meanwhile, the actual problem of spam in China will continue unabated.
  • 'bout time (Score:2, Insightful)

    by CFrankBernard (605994)
    How many years now have numerous email admins either blocked all email from China or score hits to blacklists such as Blackhole's China & Korea Combined very highly? BTW, China definitely has no right to complain about firewall/gateway censorship.
  • by fohat (168135)
    I thought this was going to be about the new FPS game "Serious Spam" in which the heroine tries to defeat democracy with her spam gun and filtered Google Water (beta).
    But seriously, I hope this cuts down on the number of emails I get with all question marks in the subject line. If China is succesful with this program, perhaps other countries will follow suite. (I'm looking at you, Taiwan! *shakes fist*)

    peace out.
  • Yeah, I can see it now. Chinese email users can expect messages like the following:

    Dear Comrade,

    Your attempt to send email has been blocked due to violations of one or more of the following email filter rules:

    Your email:

    • contained unsolicited information.
    • promoted products and services critical of the state.
    • contained inappropriate sexual or religious matter.
    • is detrimental to national security.

    Note that this list is subject to change or amendment without prior notification or warning.

  • by GOD_ALMIGHTY (17678) <<curt.johnson> <at> <gmail.com>> on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:51PM (#15583818) Homepage
    will spammers get the death penalty? Think I just found the ultimate ethical delimma for the average slashdotter. Is it good if China executes a spammer, but does so in it's new fleet of mobile lethal injection vans [usatoday.com] and harvests the organs [amnesty.org] for sale? When cheering the execution of spammers, which at least half the readership here has been waiting for, can you be sure your celebration is for a real spammer or a political dissident?
    • harvesting organs from people to whom you've just given a lethal injection.. someone over there needs to retake Police State Governance 101.
      • harvesting organs from people to whom you've just given a lethal injection.. someone over there needs to retake Police State Governance 101.

        Sadly, it is possible. At least in the US, the lethal injection is actually two injections in series. The first one is a fast-acting general anaesthetic and knocks the victim out. The second one is a poison that stops the heart. Between steps 1 and 2, harvesting the unconscious prisoner's organs is possible without poisoning the receipient.

        Of course, knowing the

    • Good Lord no! Please don't use spammers for harvesting organs! Burn them completely, it is the only safe way. Then sprinkle Holy Water on the ashes.
      • I wouldnt be surprised if the bodies are sold to 'exotic meat' restaurants.

        I remember some years ago, Chinese authorities uncovered a black market for human flesh, after someone claimed a relative's body from which the leg muscles had been cut off.
    • . Is it good if China executes a spammer, but does so in it's new fleet of mobile lethal injection vans and harvests the organs for sale?

      Ugh. Creepy. Not to invoke Godwin's Law, but as someone whose family was in Poland during the Holocaust (and quite a few of them were killed in the camps), this hits a bit close to home. State-sponsored killing is still killing, no matter how much we try to sugar-coat and medicalize it. Personally, I prefer the bullet to the back of the neck. At least it's honest -

  • Gvmnt Servers (Score:3, Interesting)

    by jeffy210 (214759) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @01:51PM (#15583821)
    You know, I'm supprised with all the censoring and filtering they do, they just don't mandate all email be sent through government controlled servers and block port 25 on the "great firewall". That way they could say it's in the name of spam (or security, or whatever) and still read what they want. (I know, I know, stop giving them ideas)
  • Volunteers (Score:1, Funny)

    by nschubach (922175)
    China can have Volunteers?
  • FYI: Email postmasters, please block 70.252.29.129 (adsl-70-252-29-129.dsl.austtx.swbell.net)

    The computer at that IP address has been compromised and is spewing 'bozo spam'. [slashdot.org] I got 3 of them recently for some kind of weightloss product.

    Complete details that fully explain why this IP address should be blocked is here. [slashdot.org]

    I assure you, this is not a prank, joke, or 'dirty trick' ('joe job').

    Thank you for your consideration.
  • Didn't Chairman Mao like, invent spam with all those "Little Red Book"s he kept jamming down people's throats?
  • no matter to me (Score:4, Interesting)

    by TheGratefulNet (143330) on Thursday June 22, 2006 @02:16PM (#15584001)
    as each inbound connect attempt (to my ssh port, which I have tightly controlled via tcpwrappers, you morans!) is logged, so is an ipfw (freebsd) firewall entry to block either /24 or - fuck it - /16 from their netblock. IF its from .cn or .tw or .kr (etc). I discover (as they float to my log) and block. full block, not just email.

    fark them. there's zero accountability there and I doubt things will change. I run a very small site and so there is no NEED to allow spam^Hemail from those geo's.

  • Even the biggest chinese ISP doesn't follow RFC (like accepting bounces).
    They don't care about how mail works, I would be very curious how they put an end to spam.
  • I'm serious about Chinese spam too...

    *.ch DISCARD
    *.tw DISCARD

    That's MY Great Firewall.

    Welcome to the Internet... Asso...
    • Re:Sure... (Score:1, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      I would think *.cn might be a bit more effective at blocking Chinese spam.
  • Sounds like some Chinese trading partner complained so somebody needs to put on a show. The big-time spammers are all paid up with the right officials so they will be ignored. They will punish a few small-timers to remind them they need to pay up.

    When they get another complaint lather, rinse, repeat.
  • I already block China (and Taiwan, to be fair and balanced) using pobox's antispam service.
  • Ho W Wo uld y0u L1k e 2 make B I G $$$

    Si gn UP n0w and B1 of 1000 34rning BIG $$$ gov J0B

    als0 R3crui7ing 20000!!! voleeteer to FIGHT SP4M!

    OK I can't be the first to think that this might be their way to find "volenteers" to do this. Oh the Irony!
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 22, 2006 @04:59PM (#15585049)
    See the stats here [spamhaus.org].
  • As Grandpa used to say, "t'ain't no use closin' the barn doors after all the cattle hescaped."

    There is one thing and one thing ONLY that will slow down spam at this point: A concerted and highly publicised series of spammer executions, taking place over the next two years.

    Alan Ralsky? Bullet to the head. Tony Banks? Same thing.

    Two years of putting _all_ major spammers to death might slow things down. Nothing less will.

    Now I'm not saying that this is the right move, or a noble, honourable, or moral one. Howe
  • by Ilgaz (86384) on Friday June 23, 2006 @09:42AM (#15589069) Homepage
    Hi,

    Click here: http://www.senderbase.org/ [senderbase.org]

    You will notice "top senders by domain". There are some telecoms "shouldn't be" there. They are the spam infested ISPs who doesn't have a clue about managing their services. Sadly it includes my backbone too.

    I seriously suspect China spam is sort of foreign policy. As a spamcop (free,paid)/) user for years I have right to suspect so. Also if ISPs, large ISPs end this "politically correct" crap and enable country wide user selectable blocking lists you will see how they buy those Ironport, eSafe etc. devices by paying 1% of their revenue.

    What about commercial communications? Well you will tell your business partner to find a better managed ISP.
  • so is MII supposed to be pronounced "me" or "my?"

It's not so hard to lift yourself by your bootstraps once you're off the ground. -- Daniel B. Luten

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