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ThePirateBay.org Raided and Shut Down 1189

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the surprised-it-lasted-this-long dept.
An anonymous reader writes "ThePirateBay.org, a longtime fixture of the BitTorrent community, is currently under investigation. Slyck.com is reporting their servers have been seized by the Swedish police." What's really interesting about them is the strange political power that they held in their homeland. There was much discussion even of a political party. This will be interesting to watch unfold.
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ThePirateBay.org Raided and Shut Down

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  • When you're a fledgling political party [wikipedia.org] - you cannot buy this sort of publicity.

    What we probably have here is pressure (who doesn't doubt it didn't go down like this [wikipedia.org]) from a foreign organisation to shut down something that's legal under Swedish law. (The torrent files themselves contain no copyrighted information).

    Is this going to permanently shutdown thepiratebay.org? I doubt it.

    Is this going to help the Pirate Party's chances for election in the September elections and be detrimental to the content oligopolist's interests in the long run? Hell yes.

    Mildly offtopic, if TPB is shutdown, the thing I'm going to miss most is their 'legal' section (with legal threats + responses) - here's one of my favorite responses (via google cache [64.233.183.104]):
    I have the distinct pleasure of informing you that no Swedish trademark and/or coypyright law is being violated, regardless of how the situation may or may not be under UK law. I would advise you to read up on Swedish trademark law, more specifically Varumarkeslag (1960:644), as this might save you a great deal of future humiliation.

    I would also advise you to
    a) not write the subject all in UPPERCASE, as it makes spam filters go nuts
    b) not attach meaningless data from trademark registrys in PDF format and
    c) stop lying.
    (in response to a threat from Sega europe)
    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:18AM (#15434626)
      I bet it was really ninjas.
    • by extintor (826864) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @10:34AM (#15435318) Homepage
      The pirate party and thepiratebay are not affiliated in any way. They are to different movements.
  • by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohn&gmail,com> on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:15AM (#15434615) Journal
    The lauch of the Pirate Party [battleangel.org]. The Pirate Party website [piratpartiet.se] (in Swedish as far as I can tell). And the English version [piratpartiet.se]. As you can see, it's taking forever for those pages to load (if at all). I suspect this to be due to their server reduction. The Wikipedia entry on the Pirate Party [wikipedia.org]. An interview with the founder [linuxp2p.com].

    From the first link, the aims of the Pirate Party seem to be:
    • Strike out immaterial law. Every last bit of it.
    • Disregard WIPO and WTO completely. Even though the US will "go bananas" as they put it.
    • Annul any further treaties or policies that hinder the free flow of information.
    • Stand up for privacy. No data retention nonsense based on terrorism shills or failed **AA business models.
    • by Meneth (872868) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:25AM (#15434677)
      > Strike out immaterial law. Every last bit of it.
      Not every bit. They want a five-year commercial-only copyright term; allowing for non-commercial copying and use during that period.
      Also, personal information and trademarks are to retain their protection.

      > Disregard WIPO and WTO completely. Even though the US will "go bananas" as they put it.
      Again, not completely. The WTO regulates some non-IP issues, on which the Pirate Party has no opinion.
    • by Stentapp (19941) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:25AM (#15434679) Journal
      First comment from the Pirate Party: http://www2.piratpartiet.se/nyheter/the_pirate_bay _and_piratbyran_taken_down_by_police [piratpartiet.se]
      "Swedish police has today taken all the servers of The Pirate Bay into custody. Two operators of The Pirate Bay are in police custody, and can't be reached.

      Swedish police has today taken all the servers of The Pirate Bay into custody. The police chose to do this despite the fact that the services provided by the worlds largest bittorrent tracker are fully legal in Sweden.
      The servers where located in a protected area, to which the police had no legal right to enter, but this was ignored.
      Piratbyrån (the Pirate Bureau), a swedish pro-pirate lobby organisation, also got their servers seized, since they where located in the same room.
      Two operators of The Pirate Bay are in police custody, and can't be reached.
      This article will be updated as more news come in.
      14:35: 50 policemen participated in the raid."
    • by JanneM (7445) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:26AM (#15434691) Homepage
      Note that their program would invalidate Creative Commons and the GPL as well. I am Swedish, I worry a lot about the IP land grab going on, but no way will I vote for those people come september.

      • by arose (644256) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:33AM (#15434748)
        I am Swedish, I worry a lot about the IP land grab going on, but no way will I vote for those people come september.
        Why not? Unless they get the majority (do you think they will?) they should make a nice counterbalance.
      • by isorox (205688) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @10:35AM (#15435321) Homepage Journal
        I am Swedish, I worry a lot about the IP land grab going on

        IPv6 will sort that out
      • by bentcd (690786) <bcd@pvv.org> on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @11:22AM (#15435764) Homepage
        Note that their program would invalidate Creative Commons and the GPL as well.
        More importantly, their program would make both Creative Commons and GPL redundant. With no copyrights, everything would be in the commons, so a separate "Creative Commons" would not be necessary. The only reason we need the GPL is because commercial interests use copyright to artificially restrict their customers' freedom to do as they wish with their products.
        Abolishment of copyright would be a decisive victory both for CC and GPL.
        • by steveha (103154) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @12:00PM (#15436127) Homepage
          Abolishment of copyright would be a decisive victory both for CC and GPL.

          Not quite.

          The GPL uses the power of copyright to enforce certain goals. If copyright loses force, the GPL loses force.

          The BSD license is basically "you can do anything you want" and if copyright runs out, that's pretty much the situation. If copyright loses force, it's like everything is now BSD-licensed.

          With no copyrights, Microsoft could take FSF software, change it, and sell the result without releasing source code. RMS would not be pleased.

          The only reason we need the GPL is because commercial interests use copyright to artificially restrict their customers' freedom to do as they wish with their products.

          No, another reason for the GPL is to keep anyone from taking free software, changing it, and not releasing the changes to the world.

          steveha
        • by JavaRob (28971) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @01:23PM (#15436958) Homepage Journal
          This is incorrect on two counts -- first, the Pirate Party isn't arguing for abolishing copyright (just limiting it to something like 5 years), second (as mentioned in other posts below) the GPL is *based* on copyright law.

          GPL uses copyright protection specifically to stop commercial interests from, say, enhancing the Linux kernel and selling the result as a closed source product. Without copyright protections, the commercial company COULD do this with impunity.

          Personally, I agree that current copyright law is ridiculous, but 5 years seems way too short. I would argue for something like 40 or 50 years. There are plenty of examples of creative work that was a dud on initial release, but became a cult favorite a decade later... or creative work that was the product of decades of work, from a creator who would not be able to "just do more" to keep an income stream once copyright ended. We want to support these kinds of "master works" or "life's work" projects, not say, "sorry, but your 5 years is up -- if the word is still spreading, hey; sucks to be you".
    • The Pirate Party (Score:5, Informative)

      by Christian Engstrom (633834) <christian...engstrom@@@piratpartiet...se> on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @10:30AM (#15435271) Homepage
      Unfortunately our server has gone down right now (overload, not police raid), so I'll post the English description of our political agenda here.

      The Pirate Party

      The Pirate Party is a newly formed political party in Sweden. We want to fundamentally reform copyright law, get rid of the patent system, and ensure that citizens' rights to privacy are respected. With this agenda, and only this, we are making a bid for representation in the Swedish parliament in the upcoming national elections in September.

      Not only do we think these are worthwhile goals. We also believe they are realistically achievable on a European basis. The sentiments that led to the formation of the Pirate Party in Sweden are present throughout Europe. There are already similar political initiatives under way in several other member states. Together, we will be able to set a new course for a Europe that is currently heading in a very dangerous direction.

      The Pirate Party only has three issues on its agenda:

      Reform of copyright law
      The official aim of the copyright system has always been to find a balance between the interests of publishers and consumers, in order to promote culture being created and spread. Today that balance has been completely lost, to a point where the copyright laws severely restrict the very thing they are supposed to promote. The Pirate Party wants to restore the balance in the copyright legislation.

      All non-commercial copying and use should be completely free. File sharing and p2p networking should be encouraged rather than criminalized. Culture and knowledge are good things, that increase in value the more they are shared. The Internet could become the greatest public library ever created.

      The monopoly for the copyright holder to exploit an aesthetic work commercially should be limited to five years after publication. Today's copyright terms are simply absurd. Nobody needs to make money seventy years after he is dead. No film studio or record company bases its investment decisions on the off-chance that the product would be of interest to anyone a hundred years in the future. The commercial life of cultural works is staggeringly short in today's world. If you haven't made your money back in the first one or two years, you never will. A five years copyright term for commercial use is more than enough. Non-commercial use should be free from day one.

      We also want a complete ban on DRM technologies, and on contract clauses that aim to restrict the consumers' legal rights in this area. There is no point in restoring balance and reason to the legislation, if at the same time we continue to allow the big media companies to both write and enforce their own arbitrary laws.

      An abolished patent system
      Pharmaceutical patents kill people in third world countries every day. They hamper possibly life saving research by forcing scientists to lock up their findings pending patent application, instead of sharing them with the rest of the scientific community. The latest example of this is the bird flu virus, where not even the threat of a global pandemic can make research institutions forgo their chance to make a killing on patents.

      The Pirate Party has a constructive and reasoned proposal for an alternative to pharmaceutical patents. It would not only solve these problems, but also give more money to pharmaceutical research, while still cutting public spending on medicines in half. This is something we would like to discuss on a European level.

      Patents in other areas range from the morally repulsive (like patents on living organisms) through the seriously harmful (patents on software and business methods) to the merely pointless (patents in the mature manufacturing industries).

      Europe has all to gain and nothing to lose by abolishing patents outright. If we lead, the rest of the world will eventually follow.

      Respect for the right to privacy
      Following the 9/11 event in the US, Europe has

  • odd (Score:5, Interesting)

    by jflash (591249) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:19AM (#15434632)
    Odd that they did this one year ago, when they went down for maintenance.

    (coralized link)
    http://www.btflux.com.nyud.net:8080/archives/news/ 000159.php?coral-no-redirect [nyud.net]

  • Legal? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by nbannerman (974715) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:19AM (#15434634)
    So, from TFA;

    According to The Pirate Party, a Swedish copyright reform organization, the raid also seized Piratbyrån's (the Pirate Bureau) servers. In addition, The Pirate Party reports "...the servers where located in a protected area, to which the police had no legal right to enter..." Approximately 50 police participated in the raid, which placed into custody two PirateBay.org personnel.

    Now I remember reading the legal threats page, and the phrase normally went along the lines of "US Copyrights Mean Nothing Here".

    What changed? Sending letters is one thing, but something pretty heavy must be going on to warrant that kind of response.

    Can any of our swedish friends fill in the gaps here? I'm sure we're missing something.
    • Microsoft willing to give away free licences for the govt. computers in exchange for the piratebay sMicrosoft willing to give away free licences for the govt. computers in exchange for the piratebay shutdown would do it, for example...

      With any legal system there are a million of loopholes, that his how the lawyers make their big bucks. It seems like one of those MPAA/RIAA/Microsoft/Adobe lawyers found a loophole in the Swedish law after all.

      It seems the like the guys at the piratebay.org has fun with the

    • Re:Legal? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Eudial (590661) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:38AM (#15434799)

      What changed? Sending letters is one thing, but something pretty heavy must be going on to warrant that kind of response.


      Nothing as I can see it. It's still perfectly legal to link to copyright violating material in Sweden. The police probably hopes that they store some violating material on the servers. Which, hopefully, they don't.

      That, or they're after the logs so that they can do it the American Way (tm) and start suing blind 90 year olds and quadriplegics.
    • Re:Legal? (Score:5, Funny)

      by Asphalt (529464) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:45AM (#15434859)
      Now I remember reading the legal threats page, and the phrase normally went along the lines of "US Copyrights Mean Nothing Here".

      What changed? Sending letters is one thing, but something pretty heavy must be going on to warrant that kind of response.

      Can any of our swedish friends fill in the gaps here? I'm sure we're missing something.

      It's really quite simple.

      Terrorists can download .torrent files. And if terrorists can download .torrent files, then terrorists can obtain unlimited copies of material by Britney Spears, Kelly Clarkson, etc.

      This will (obviously) lead to a greater hatred of America, and western culture in general.

      This will impact the safety of all of our children as terrorists with big boners from watching Britney in that video with the short skirt will erupt into testosterone-fueled rages ... and this will greatly impact our war on terror.

      This has nothing to do with copyright law, and everything to do with the safety of the free world.

      I don't understand what you don't get about it?

      • Re:Legal? (Score:4, Funny)

        by MrNougat (927651) <`ckratsch' `at' `gmail.com'> on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @11:24AM (#15435789)
        Terrorists can download .torrent files. And if terrorists can download .torrent files, then terrorists can obtain unlimited copies of material by Britney Spears, Kelly Clarkson, etc.

        This will (obviously) lead to a greater hatred of America, and western culture in general.


        Following this logic (terrorists acquire torrents of mass-produced crap which leads to greater hatred of the West) -- I side with the terrorists in their hatred.

        (Note to NSA - not with the blowing up of things, just with the hatred.)
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:20AM (#15434640)
    Yarr! Imagine all the booty those law enforcement agents got their hands on!
  • TEXT if slashdotted (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:23AM (#15434659)
    In their native Sweden, ThePirateBay.org enjoyed a level of immunity from copyright prosecution rarely seen in the file-sharing world. Often defiant in the face of those wishing to enforce their intellectual property rights, ThePirateBay.org would go on to become one of the premier BitTorrent indexing and tracking sites.

    As one of the largest trackers, ThePirateBay.org largely replaced the demise of the SuprNova.org search engine. SuprNova.org met its demise in late 2004, when it was under pressure from the entertainment industry to shut it operation down. Conversely, such pressure has been ineffective against ThePiratebay.org.

    When such political pressure fails, the use of force is typically the next course of action. In a move that many thought would never come, Slyck.com learned this morning that ThePirateBay.org was raided by Swedish police.

    "...The police right now is taking all of our servers, to check if there is a crime there or not (they are actually not sure)," ThePirateBay.org spokesperson "brokep" told Slyck.com.

    The seizure of ThePirateBay.org's entire server farm will guarantee this BitTorrent tracker will remain offline until the police complete their investigation. Whether this will keep ThePirateBay.org offline indefinitely is another matter.

    "We are not sure when it will return, but we are moving it to another country if necessary," brokep said.

    According to The Pirate Party, a Swedish copyright reform organization, the raid also seized Piratbyrån's (the Pirate Bureau) servers. In addition, The Pirate Party reports "...the servers where located in a protected area, to which the police had no legal right to enter..." Approximately 50 police participated in the raid, which placed into custody two PirateBay.org personnel.

    The premature departure of ThePirateBay.org marks a significant turning point in the BitTorrent community. Although it's not currently known what, if any, entertainment entity is behind this raid, failure to secure ThePirateBay.org's permanent removal will only bolster this tracker's position of defiance.
    • The premature departure of ThePirateBay.org marks a significant turning point in the BitTorrent community.

      Well, it's a web site taken down in a battle against a movement in modern society. Yes, it was a popular web site, but are we really calling the Suprnova take down the same in retrospect? All good that did was spawning many others.
  • by Funkcikle (630170) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:25AM (#15434673)
    Please let me finish freeing the flow of information, specifically Season 4 of Family Guy. Thank you.
  • 24 (Score:5, Funny)

    by fluxindamix (804999) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:25AM (#15434680)
    thank god, 24 is finished !!
  • They were too cocky (Score:3, Interesting)

    by gasmonso (929871) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:26AM (#15434682) Homepage

    The should have stopped taunting the MPAA, RIAA, and just about every Hollywood movie house. Those entities combined have an enormous amount of influence and power. It was just a matter of time unfortunately.

    http://religiousfreaks.com/ [religiousfreaks.com]
  • by Rob T Firefly (844560) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:27AM (#15434696) Homepage Journal
    IANA(.se)L, but I wonder.. let's say I was using TPB's tracker to share some stuff I had full legal right to. Public Domain, Creative Commons, original material, and such. With TPB shut down, would people like me be able to file some sort of legal grudge against the Swedish police?
    • I can't imagine why. The fact that you were using the free resource for a legitimate use doesn't have any bearing on their ability to sieze it due to illegal activity.
  • by Honken (665599) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:28AM (#15434704)
    Have a look at http://stats.autonomica.se/mrtg/sums/Stockholm_GE. html [autonomica.se]. The fact that the pirate bay clearly affected the total bandwidth of the entire city of Stockholm says something of how big the site is.
  • Oh shit (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:29AM (#15434712)
    If file-sharing friendly Sweden can go down, what could happen for other countries? This doesn't bode well for private trackers. Some are hosted in the Netherlands (Demonoid, Empornium, Pure TnA) or Canada (BitMeTV). Sweden-based TvTorrents might be next. Maybe its time to stop donating funds to the private trackers lest one gets accused of funding piracy...
  • by Garabito (720521) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:39AM (#15434813)
    but swedish police officers might have not liked when they were told to "sodomize themselves with retractable batons".
  • Story unfolds... (Score:5, Informative)

    by Jarlsberg (643324) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:40AM (#15434821) Journal
    http://www.aftonbladet.se/vss/nyheter/story/0,2789 ,834356,00.html [aftonbladet.se]
    For the benefit of those who don't speak swedish, here's a short summary:
    3 people have been arrested, age 22, 24 and 28. They have not been charged, but are taken in because they the police suspect they have violated copyright laws. The persons are directly connected to TPB.org. They are as of an hour ago still under interrogation. 50 police men have worked on the case.
  • by CrtxReavr (62039) <`moc.mumitpoirt' `ta' `rvaerxtrc'> on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:45AM (#15434854)
    Now I feel guilty about ad-blocking the banners on there. . .

    -CR

  • by entoke (933113) <kristoffer.ritenius@gmail.com> on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:47AM (#15434873)
    http://www.antipiratbyran.com/index.htm?id=news&p= p19#19 [antipiratbyran.com]

    "The Pirate Bay nedstängd

    Polisen genomförde idag en rad husrannsakningar mot lokaler där The Pirate Bay bedriver sin verksamhet. Klockan 12 30 stängdes sidan thepiratebay.org ned.

    The Pirate Bay var fram tills igår knutpunkten för en stor del av världens illegala fildelning. Enligt egna uppgifter fanns det en dryg miljon användare som kunde laddade upp och ned främst filmer, spel och musik. Genom sin storlek och uttalade målsättning att hänga ut och håna berörda upphovsmän gjorde man The Pirate Bay känd över hela världen. Sverige blev internationellt känt som en fristad för dem som begick upphovsrättsbrott på Internet. Detta utnyttjades ekonomiskt för en omfattande försäljning av annonser, porreklam och insamling av donationer.

    Det är bra att den svenska polisen nu prioriterar denna typ av brottslighet. Det är upphovsrätten som finansierar nyskapandet inom film, datorspel, musik och övrig kultur. Den som bryter mot upphovsrättslagen stjäl från framtidens kreatörer och biopublik. Därför är stängningen av The Pirate Bay bra för alla oss som uppskattar ny film och underhållning säger Henrik Pontén, jurist på Antipiratbyrån.

    Svenska produktioner drabbas i hög grad av den illegala nedladdningen, säger Per-Erik Wallin, Föreningen Sveriges Filmproducenter. Om svenska filmer finns tillgängliga på nätet före premiären innebär det minskade chanser att filmerna ska spela hem produktionskostnaden och mindre medel för att göra nästa film. Det drabbar både manusförfattare, regissörer, skådespelare och filmarbetare."

    Roughly translated

    "The pirate bay closed

    Today the police raided multiple places were The Pirate Bay conducts its operations. At 12.30 the site thepiratebay.org was closed.

    The pirate Bay was until yesterday the center for a large part of the worlds illegal filesharing. According to piratebay itself there was over a million users who could upload or download foremost movies, games and music.

    By its size and outspoken goal of ridiculing authors The pirate Bay got known all over the world.

    Sweden got known internationally as an asylum for those who commited copyright crimes on the internet. This was use economicaly for a large scale sale of adds, pornadds and donations.

    It is good that the swedish police now priority this kind of crime. It is the copyright that finances creation in movies, computergames, music and other culture. Whoever breaks the copyright steals from future auothors and cinema audience. Therefore the closing of The Pirate Bay is good for all of us that apreciate new Movies and entertainment says Henrik Pontén, legal advisor at Antipiratbyrån.

    Swedish productions are very much affected by illegal downloading, say Per-Erik Wallin, Föreningen Sveriges Filmproducenter. If swedish movies are availible on the net before the premiere chances are smaller that the movies will get the production cost back and less means to make the next movie. It affects both scriptwriters, directors, actors and filmcrews."

    Note that this truly is a crappy translation.

  • by TheDunadan (950302) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:49AM (#15434891)
    that tommorrow last year the exact same thing "happened" and it was hoax. I haven't read the article because the server appears to be slashdotted, but it seems awefully suspicious that the same story of TPB being raided by Swedish police shows up again a year later almost to the day.
  • Damnit! (Score:5, Funny)

    by cimmer (809369) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:53AM (#15434924)
    In other news, the global warming index increased unexpectedly by 1.2% this morning.
  • by giulietta masina (881163) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @09:58AM (#15434960) Homepage

    The Pirate Bureau have set up a temporary news blog to inform the public about this whole incident: http://piratbyran.blogspot.com/ [blogspot.com]

    Shutting down The Pirate Bay can be compared to shutting down Google, by Swedish laws. Both sites supply a search engine with which you can find legal and illegal material on the internet. TPB will prevail.

  • Ahhhhhhh (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @10:03AM (#15434997)
    It's as if millions of geeks cried out at once... and were suddenly silenced.
  • The Pirate Bay (Score:5, Insightful)

    by GauteL (29207) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @10:07AM (#15435025)
    I can sort of believe that they had no illegal copies of anything in the office where The Pirate Bay was located. It makes it easier for them to wipe their hands of any wrongdoing.

    However, as the main goal of the pirate bay is to facilitate copyright infringement, I find it very hard to believe that none of these guys had any illegal copies of stuff at home, on their laptops, etc.

    Since their homes apparently also were raided, this is probably a way for the authorities to get to them, even if the Pirate Bay itself does nothing illegal. When you are involved in something like The Pirate Bay, it is too tempting to use it yourself.

    Of course, if Swedish copyright law allows for downloading copyrighted material for personal use, then this will be fine as well.

  • by andi75 (84413) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @10:28AM (#15435253) Homepage
    ...they're hoping that someone posts a link to a repacement site...
  • by Lars Arvestad (5049) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @11:00AM (#15435574) Homepage Journal
    What's really interesting about them is the strange political power that they held in their homeland.

    I am Swedish and I don't think that TPB has had much influence at all, laws and attitudes would have been just the same if this was an organization outside Sweden. My guess is that the presence of the organisation is simply reflecting current attitudes in general in Sweden today. It is notable that a minister in the socialdemocratic government downloaded mp3s, burned them to CD, and gave it to friend as a birthday present [aftonbladet.se] (Swedish article) already in 2000, without seeing any wrong with it.

    An explanation to this phenomenon could be a tradition of relatively strong consumer protection laws (and traditions), and that the "personal use" clauses in copyright have always been defended here.

  • by praps (870215) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @11:26AM (#15435813)
    Full article in English here [thelocal.se] with recent quotes direct from the Swedish police and the leader of the Pirate Party. Apparently it's a very early stage in the investigation - so maybe more arrests to come?
  • by Dot Solipsism (972171) on Wednesday May 31, 2006 @11:35AM (#15435896)
    At least they waited until after all the season finales before raiding.

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