Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Controller Comparison - PlayStation 3 vs. Wii 203

Posted by Zonk
from the dualshake-vs-wiimote dept.
ZiakII writes "Engadet has an article comparing the PS3 Controller to the Wii's Controller. From the article: 'The motion control, however, was another story entirely. Whereas the Wiimote seemed to produce different experiences in different games and scenarios, the only title being shown with motion on the PS3 produced one experience: laggy control.'"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Controller Comparison - PlayStation 3 vs. Wii

Comments Filter:
  • by pembo13 (770295) on Monday May 15, 2006 @07:36PM (#15338929) Homepage
    I guess this is why some companies go overboard with the whole patenting thing. Nintendo tries something risky, and somewhat innovative, and its competition tries to copy it as soon as it can. Kinda sad really.
    • by Suddenly_Dead (656421) on Monday May 15, 2006 @07:53PM (#15339037)
      What could Nintendo have patented? I'm pretty sure they have patents on the position sensor thingamajig that you place above the television, but the Sony's method seems strictly to be using accelerometers. Accelerometers are nothing new, and have been used before in game controllers.
      • Accelerometers are nothing new, and have been used before in game controllers.

        Specifically, this one [amazon.com].

        I have one of these. It's fun in some games and a pain in the butt in others. I really enjoyed Motocross Madness, but car driving games, well, drove me crazy.

        The Wiimote is a very different technology, but it suffers from the same fatal flaws as every other motion sensing controller (you can count the EyeToy in here too)... a)the body likes to push against something and b) the body likes small control mov
      • That's why it's not patented. I think the point was that when the tech is new, that's why you patent it. As in, in the hypothetical situation.
    • I actually think this could be a good thing. I mean, I'm a Nintendo fangirl through and through, but I can't deny that Microsoft and Sony are extremely good at making graphically powerful machines and pulling very talented third-party developers on board. Realistic graphics and pure Nintendo-style fun don't necessarily need to be at odds, and if the next iteration of the Xbox or Playstation can rip off some of Nintendo's good ideas, I think we'll all be better for it.
      • by Anonymous Coward on Monday May 15, 2006 @08:21PM (#15339180)
        I'm a Nintendo fangirl

        Will you marry me?
      • by DrWho520 (655973) on Tuesday May 16, 2006 @07:57AM (#15341228) Journal
        How about an exercise? Boys, pay attention, this is especially for you. What would happen if we did a little term swap here.
        ...if the next iteration of the Xbox or Playstation can rip off some of Nintendo's good ideas, I think we'll all be better for it.
        If we replace the first phrase with Windows and the second term with Linux's then we get:
        ...if the next iteration of Windows can rip off some of Linux's good ideas, I think we'll all be better for it.
        The first phrase is modded +4 interesting and the second is modded -NaN Overated Flametroll. Now, is slashdot awash in Sony fanboys or did you all start drooling so much when you read fangirl that you completely ignored that statement? Competition is good. Ripping off someone's idea is bad, because it leads to uncontrollable patenting by paranoid companies.

        Now that we have that out of the way, will you marry me?
        • Given that I already have to use Windows for gaming, if they ever copy Linux's stability, security, and command-line-driven power, I certainly won't be complaining.

          Also keep in mind that this isn't exactly the first time that Nintendo's been ripped off -- it has a history of leading gaming trends. However, if the Wii does become the leader of a trend rather than just a unique and quirky console, we're going to get more competition, and Nintendo will be forced to come up with even more interesting and fu
          • Also keep in mind that this isn't exactly the first time that Nintendo's been ripped off -- it has a history of leading gaming trends. However, if the Wii does become the leader of a trend rather than just a unique and quirky console, we're going to get more competition, and Nintendo will be forced to come up with even more interesting and fun ideas to give itself an edge.

            That's basically what nintendo has done non-stop for the past decade. Nintendo makes its money growing the market sideways, creating ne
      • Considering that Peter Moore (MS) has said that he's impressed with the Wii and that everybody will probably buy it as a 2nd console right after they buy a 360... and then Phil Harrison (Sony) said that Peter Moore was right, everywone will buy one right after they buy a PS3 ....

        Hey, wait a sec, that's not what he said....

        At any rate, even Sony and Microsoft seem to think that the Wii will do very well and operate largely independent of their battle of the (schoolyard) titans.
    • Sony's Movement-Sensing Controller Patent [espacenet.com]. Stolen from Nintendo, or making use of the patent at an opportune time?
    • Too bad microsoft and logitec had motion sensing controllers 7 years ago and atari had some motion sensing stick 20 years ago.

      Source [gamespot.com]

      • that was tilt sensing not motion sensing

        PS3 and Wii's controllers can detect movement along x/y/z axis.

        The Logitech Gamepad Wingman Extreme and Microsoft Freestyle controllers can only detect tilt, meaning, 3 degrees of freedom. PS3 and Wii are 6 degrees of freedom. Wii however has a sensor bar to detect position as well.
  • by demonic-halo (652519) on Monday May 15, 2006 @07:47PM (#15338997)
    With all those gesturing Nintendo players are doing with their right arm & the motion sensing controllers. It's going to look kinda suspicious on a gamer if their right arm is much more buff than their left.

    Of course, I think what's going to happen are alot of out of shaped gamers will just get tired too easily and will return to the GameCube. We know they had to remove using motion for regular attacks from Zelda because gamers got to tired.

    But we also know the PS3 advance graphics will be hard to program for, and their motion sensing isn't as robust as the Wii. So from a development standpoint, developing for the PS2 makes most sense. Everyone has it already, and it's getting dirt cheap. Whoever wins the HD format war, jsut buy a stand alone player.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday May 15, 2006 @07:47PM (#15339000)
    That's a PS3 controller? Looks just like a PS1 controller to me.

    Thanks for the great design, Sony.
    • On a Good Note..

      Perfect opportunity for 3rd party controller designers. PS2 has some innovative add-ons like the Eye-toy and the Guitar Hero controller.
      • Perfect opportunity for 3rd party controller designers. PS2 has some innovative add-ons like the Eye-toy and the Guitar Hero controller.

        which will never get used except the games that force you to buy their extra peripherals

        and every other game will use the same exact controller as the PS2.

        hope you like sequels!
        • And almost every PC game uses keyboard and mouse.

          Yet, still, I'd say there is a lot more leading innovation, both of the revolutionary new game style and the evolutionary increasing depth in existing styles, in PC games than on consoles.

          Making a new controller may enable certain kinds of innovation, or at least novelty, in game play, but isn't necessary to or all that closely related to novelty or innovation in game design. Though its a way to get novelty in game experience without advancing the design of t
    • This one goes to 11.
    • What's wrong with that? It's comfortable for a lot of people, and all the buttons are within easy reach. I personally really like the Playstation controller. Why does the controller have to be redesigned with every console release?
      • "Why does the controller have to be redesigned with every console release?"

        For the simple reason that the original PS controller wasn't built to accomodate the games being played today. I loved San Andreas, but I would have been far less frustrated with it if I had waited for the PC version.
        • Who's fault is that? Sony for sticking with a design thats comfortable for a lot of their users, or the game maker who knew what the controller was going to be like and still made the game so that it didn't work well with it.
          • "Who's fault is that? Sony for sticking with a design thats comfortable for a lot of their users, or the game maker who knew what the controller was going to be like and still made the game so that it didn't work well with it."

            Sony for sticking with a design that isn't comfortable for users playing popular games.
      • The PSX controller didn't have analog sticks and when they added the sticks they put them on in a very unobtrusive way because they were not the primary method of control. The PS dual shock controller is the only one that still puts the old D-pad in the top-left location, which is the easiest place to reach. If Sony just swapped the locations of the D-pad and left stick that would be fine, but they've decided that analog sticks should be a secondary feature while game developers want to use them as the prim
    • I concur (I'm not trying to troll). They always use the excuse "We made the perfect controller even better", but the truth is, it isn't. The n64 was the most comfortable controller to me, and until they meet or beat that, it could use improvement.
      • Interestingly, the nunchuck half of the controller looks a lot like the central handle of the n64 controller. It has a similar shape, a thumb stick, and a trigger (actually two triggers, I think).

        I've yet to hold it in my hand, of course, but I wonder if it feels the same.

    • Hey why change it when you're on to a good thing, right?

  • by docdude316 (836485) on Monday May 15, 2006 @07:56PM (#15339055)
    The fact that there is only one game that utilizes the motion control and the fact that Warhawk's development team only had a few weeks to put it into the game is very telling that this was a last minute addition to the console. If there's anyone out there that thinks that Sony isn't trying to copy the Wii they are in denial. I just hope that Sony's cheap rip-off doesn't cause people to overlook the Wii because they think it will be bad as well.
    • by Hannah E. Davis (870669) on Monday May 15, 2006 @08:02PM (#15339086) Journal
      I think that's one place where the Wii's oddly-shaped controller will actually help -- to the average consumer, even if both have motion sensitivity, they're clearly completely different objects. Even if people are turned off motion sensitivity by the PS3, there's still a fair chance that they'll look at the Wii and think "Hey, that looks like fun!" rather than "Oh, I tried one of those before and it sucked."
    • You can't have it both ways...

      Either the controller felt laggy because the controller sucks or because WarHawk only had a few weeks to work on it... It makes no sense to say that *both* are true.

      IMO, you're right. Sony got the controller working very late, and WarHawk only had a few weeks to work on it... and despite that many reviews have said that the controller felt quite natural. Of course, in the end it's a matter of taste.

      • I don't see why you can't. We can break it down into two parts: "controller sucks" and "short on time."

        The controller could suck with regards to that game because it was short on time to make the game.
        The controller could suck regardless of how much time was put into the game.
        The controller could not suck even if they were short on time to make the game.
        The controller could not suck regardless of time put into the game.

        I don't get how it has to be either a software or hardware problem, but not both. There's
  • by drewmca (611245) on Monday May 15, 2006 @08:31PM (#15339239)
    My first disappointment with this controller is lack of a rumble feature, but following swiftly on its heels is disappointment in the fact that they didn't take the opportunity to move the damn analog controllers into a more ergonomically friendly location.

    Every PS fanboy states that the dual-shock is the best controller out there, but when it comes to analog stick placement, it's only because it's what they're used to. Crook your thumbs into the shape necessary to work with the dualshock sticks. Then move them around a little. You'll feel a little fatigue (maybe not much, if you've played a lot with the controller). Then move your thumbs up a little, into the place where the gamecube and xbox controllers have the analog sticks. Move them around again. You'll likely feel less fatigue. That's because your thumbs are in a more relaxed place there, not having to exert any effort to hold it.

    It's no surprise that 2 different companies placed the sticks higher up than the dualshock after 2 completely separate bouts of ergonomic research. The thumbs in the dualshock position are already flexing to keep that position. Your most natural position to rest your thumb is on your index finger. If you rest your thumbs on your ring finger, you'll feel the muscles pull because they need to to reach that non-natural state. It's the same state they're in when using the dualshock. You have to exert energy just to keep them at a rest state with those sticks.

    The worst part of the design is that it's an example of lazy, "that's the way it's supposed to be" design. It's like the classic story (in software development circles) of the woman who always cut the ends off of a roast before cooking it. When her husband asked why, she said, "that's the way my mom did it; that's the way you're supposed to do it." Later, she asked her mom why she cut the ends off, and her mom told her "because my pan was too small to hold the whole roast." That's the same thing with the design of the dualshock. Those sticks aren't there because of exhaustive ergonomic studies. They're there because they're an afterthought. They were added to the original PS1 controller well after the system's original release, and they were put in the only place they fit. No one wanted to change the rest of the controller around (which is, by the way, a fine controller if you don't use the analog sticks). After they caught on, no one wanted to go back and move them around, because controllers are such an iconic part of console branding.

    So that's why I'm disappointed. They had a chance to fix a bad design. It was even more important that they do so today, since most games nowadays use the analog sticks instead of the d-pad. But they didn't, and that's just sad. So now the more frequently used controls are in a harder to reach place, but hey, you can hit that d-pad to change weapons or select from a menu just fine. Oh, and now you can tilt the thing, too....
    • by MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) on Monday May 15, 2006 @09:33PM (#15339480)
      "Every PS fanboy states that the dual-shock is the best controller out there, but when it comes to analog stick placement, it's only because it's what they're used to."

      There are things about the PS2 controller that I like, it is fairly comfortable, but I agree with everything you've said. Only I want to add a couple of complaints:

      1.) The L3 and R3 buttons. Oh, thanks a lot for that. I understand where they're coming from on them. It's great that you can just press 'down' and get another click there. On paper, this sounds great. San Andreas, for example, used this to honk the horn. Very intuitive. Except... I didn't know about it at first! My first clue to it came from making extreme turns in the game. Every time I whipped around the corner, HOOOOOOONNNNNNNKKKKKKKKKKK. WTF? Worse, the game would give me clues to it. "Press the R3 button.." I looked all over the damn controller, couldn't find anything labeled R3. Eventually I figured it out. But.. yeesh. It took me a long time to get to where I could use the controller without accidently hitting that button. Even then, I'm not perfect at it. In my humble opinion, it's not good UI design when you tie features to buttons that could be hit easily. At least in San Andreas's case, it wasn't a big deal.

      2.) This isn't really the fault of the Dual Shock controller, but Sony's choice in particular. Why on Earth did they think it was a good idea to use heiroglyphics for the symbols of the buttons? Nintendo (and every other console company out there...) had the right idea. A, B, X, Y, L, R. Easy enough to commit to memory. Sony, argh. Normally, this isn't a big issue. Typically with Playstation games, the buttons are fairly intuitively laid out. San Andreas, though, used these shapes to play a DDR'esque game. They'd show you the symbols you need to hit, and you've got to press the correct button at the right time to get the score. This means you have to memorize the button for each symbol. This is attainable, but thoroughly unnecessary. If this were on the Game Cube, this wouldn't have been a problem.

      Yeesh. Sad thing is, they have a legacy to follow. They're not going to address either of my complaints, now. Thanks to backwards compatibility, the symbols are here to stay, and they cannot remove the 3 buttons. I can imagine my complaints wouldn't ever be Sony's #1 concern, but I still find it pretty pathetic. I cannot believe they didn't address the whole "analog sticks suck for FPS games" problem. A built in 'light zapper' sensor on the controller would have been better than nothing, cheap too. I'm honestly shocked that niether MS nor Sony tried this. I think Phil Harrison and Peter Moore should be locked in a room and forced to play a version of San Andreas without the auto-targetting feature.

      • I agree with the click-stick button. It's not just a problem with PS, though. I'm playing a lot of oblivion these days and constantly find myself going into crouch mode when things get frantic. I'm trying to zap monsters and run away, and all of a sudden I'm crouched down and move slower (right stick). Or I find myself in third person view (left stick) and get awfully confused. Though click-sticks do work nicely for sniper zoom, I find. Very intuitive there.

        As for the symbols, they're a pretty key part of t
      • While I do enjoy the overall complaint, I must point out that A, B, X, Y, L, R only makes reasonable sense in English (or maybe general european) langauges. For the rest of the world, they're just wierd english letters. Like if they used Cyrillic for the keys, really. Of course, many people world over know English. But Triangle works about as well. The only benefit is for those of us who speak english, ABXYLR is eaiser to type than XOSTLR.

        Mostly, I think it was a marketing gimmick to differentiate themselve
      • This isn't really the fault of the Dual Shock controller, but Sony's choice in particular. Why on Earth did they think it was a good idea to use heiroglyphics for the symbols of the buttons? Nintendo (and every other console company out there...) had the right idea. A, B, X, Y, L, R. Easy enough to commit to memory. Sony, argh.

        I have the opposite problem. I can never remember which GameCube button is X, which is Y, and which is Z.

        On the PS2, on the other hand, three of the shapes relate naturally to the

        • "I have the opposite problem. I can never remember which GameCube button is X, which is Y, and which is Z."

          Can't say I've ever had a problem with that. X is on the left side, Y is on the right side, Z is on the under side. (I do, however, confuse Z for R sometimes. That point I'll concede.) The extra bonus with the X and the Y is that they have the distinctive kidney bean shape.

          "The square is to the left near the square-shaped center of the controller; the circle is to the right near the rounded outer e
        • ### I have the opposite problem. I can never remember which GameCube button is X, which is Y, and which is Z.

          For most games you don't need to know the label of the button, since the buttons have distinctive shapes (which also give very good hints at their position) and colors and games use those shapes and colors often in documentation, both in-game and in the manual.

          PS2 on the other side has just shapes, which except the triangle don't give much hint on their position. The situation with the PS2 however ge
      • IMHO symbols are much easier to remember than letters. I don't own a PS2 and yet I will forever remember that Triangle is Up etc. Its much easier to remember symbols than letters and systems which just use A,B,C,D are IMHO making it harder on their users.
      • Why on Earth did they think it was a good idea to use heiroglyphics for the symbols of the buttons?

        I hate the heiroglyphs too.. but there actually is a logic behind them.

        They're actually numbered 1-4.

        Circle = 1 Line
        X = Two Lines
        Triangle = Three Lines
        Square = Four Lines.

        Retarded I know.
    • It's like the classic story (in software development circles) of the woman who always cut the ends off of a roast before cooking it.
      This can also be called the onion in the varnish -- see google.
    • The Dual Shock was originally seen as a competitor to the N64's analog control. Originally Sony was going to just tack one joystick onto the controller (the left one), but tests with prototypes showed this arrangement was terribly unbalanced, so they added another stick to balance it out. Wah. That's why it looks the way it does today.

      You seem to be forgetting about the fact that during the PS2's lifetime an increaing number of titles depended on the symmetical positioning of the sticks, Katamari Damachi co
    • Crook your thumbs into the shape necessary to work with the dualshock sticks. Then move them around a little. You'll feel a little fatigue (maybe not much, if you've played a lot with the controller).

      I first got a DualShock, the one with the analouge sticks, way back when it came out in a dual pack with MediEvil, one of the first dual shock games. MediEvil was designed to promote use of the sticks, both of them, and I ended up using them both a lot. It was the first game to show the power of two analouge s
      • The controller for the 360 gives me problems if I play too long. The
        problem is that there's only one way to hold the controller that lets
        you use the trigger buttons and the analog stick at the same time (I
        suppose this might depend on hand size).

        At least with the PS2 controller, I can adjust my grip on the controller
        without having problems using the buttons. This lets me play all night
        without any hand fatigue. I start getting tired with the 360 controller
        in less than an hour.
    • The analog stick placement always annoyed me on the PS2 controller. The last time I griped about it, someone told me I was holding the controller wrong, and that I should hold it so that my fingers just barely reach the shoulder buttons. My question ... then how do I reach the face buttons? That was met with dead silence.
    • that nintendo has placed both analog sticks in the center for their Wii controller for non-motion-sensor games. It looks like the bastard offspring of an overweight SNES controller and the DualShock.

      It will be great for the vintage games with the d-pad in the comfy spot, but they've sure made it ugly for the 3D platformers we're used to.
  • Ergonomics (Score:5, Insightful)

    by A Brand of Fire (640320) on Monday May 15, 2006 @08:58PM (#15339358) Homepage

    The Wii's control scheme has a significant advantage over that of its rivals' with regard to ergonomics. Holding the Wii-mote and the nunchaku device in the opposing hand (doesn't seem to make a difference if you're a righty or a lefty, either) at an adequate distance can reduce the strain on the wrists, elbows, and shoulders of the player's arms, allowing for a much more relaxed, more natural positioning of limbs. The human hands weren't meant to be held so close together for extended periods of time, which is why gaming with a keyboard and mouse has always been more comfortable (though not completely) than gaming with just the keyboard or with a controller.

    And I'm guessing many of the functions with the Wii-mote and the nunchaku won't have to be motion-centric per se, at least not on the level of play that is shown in demonstrations--I think this is more of a basic human reaction amidst adaptation to the control scheme. i.e. The brain thinks, "Hey, I'm moving!" and the body gradually reacts more naturally to the movement on the screen and its interface through the controller. For many veterans (and some newcomers), I'm sure great sweeping movements in repetition won't be necessary, which would further reinforce its ergonomic benefits.

  • Katamari (Score:3, Insightful)

    by gEvil (beta) (945888) on Monday May 15, 2006 @09:18PM (#15339423)
    All I can say is that it's sad that the Katamari series is dead [slashdot.org] (for now at least). That's probably the one game where I can really see using the PS3's tilt-controller. Well, that and Monkey Ball.
  • What has me thinking is, how long before someone hacks the wiimote to use as a mouse? And then, think of the possibilities - an internet (or file explorer if you like) that you navigate with a 3d interface, using the wiimote?

    I know SOMEONE is going to come up with some pretty amazing implementation of something like this. At least some gestures...

    slight flick to the left, go back a page - slight flick to the right, forward a page... forward and you "zoom in" one level of heirarchy, back and you zoom back ou

    • I'm not sure exactly how it works, but Gyration, Inc. [gyration.com] (which Nintendo has a majority stake in) has had an "air mouse" [gyration.com] out for a while now.
    • Apple did this several years ago (back in the pre-OS X days) with a browser/plug-in called "HotSauce". It worked, somewhat, but wasn't nearly as cool or as useful as one might have hoped for. There are probably far better ones out there now that are more like the 3D file browsers available today. But, like most of these types of browsers, they are mostly a gimmick and don't really offer any real benefit over traditional 2D interfaces.

      What may make the difference though with regards to web browsing on a Wii,
    • Well, Wii will reportedly come with Opera, the web browser that pioneered mouse gestures.

      So not all that much hacking left to do...
  • by jjustice (158891) on Tuesday May 16, 2006 @02:45AM (#15340490) Homepage
    Well, I tried both Wii and PS3/Warhawk at E3, and while I was predisposed to like the Wii and skeptical of Sony's 'last minute' addition, I was disappointed with the Wii and impressed with the PS3 controller.

    First off, I really like the PS2/Dual-Analog style controller, so that wasn't going to be a problem for me. I don't like the non-symmetrical layout of the Gamecube and I hated the first-party XBox controllers. The 360 controller is perhaps the best, with the 'bumpers' instead of the white/black buttons that are in different places on different controllers, and the triggers that actually allow for varying degrees of input (which is hard to get with Sony's buttons).

    My friends and I were all excited to swordfight with the Wii controller. Problem was, it didn't actually let you control the sword in 3D space, it only let you determine when to swing. Not to say that the controller couldn't do it right, but it hasn't yet. Also, I really didn't like using the Wii controller for the FPS sections of the game, although I was told that Metroid worked much better.

    The Wii controller was very sensitive and responsive, but the games just weren't using it to its potential yet. I'm hoping that if they're just afraid 'real' 3D control is too complicated, they'll have some 'advanced'/'arcade' options in there like you often see on console flight simulators. The best game I played in Nintendo's booth was the driving game, which could have been done just as well on PS3, and would have looked better. (Note that they said that 'something came up' and kicked everyone out of the booth before I got to try Zelda, Mario, or Metroid -- probably Paris Hilton showed up or something...)

    Meanwhile, after seeing what appeared to be a laggy demo at the press conference, I was pleasantly surprised by how well Warhawk worked. I'm sorry, but anyone who says it's laggy was probably wearing their Nintendo-colored glasses. I found it very easy and natural to pilot my Warhawk, which is very promising given that they had apparently only added this control mode a few weeks before E3! Meanwhile, Nintendo's betting the whole farm on this gimmick, and they still don't have it down.

    As a side note, we put in the original Warhawk when we got back, and we were amazed at how craptacular it looked. It must have been displaying like 100 polygons on screen! And at the time we thought it was awesome -- though even then we weren't fooled by the fmv...
  • The PS3 controller [e3insider.com] has 6 degrees of freedom [wikipedia.org].

    That is to say, it can sense translation in the x/y/z dimensions (3 translational axes) and it can sense rotation as roll/pitch/yaw (3 rotational axes).

    Using purely accelerometers, it would be impossible to accurately detect the rotational axes. The gravity vector would be necessary to determine the rotation of the device. You can break any algorithm relying on an accelerometer to detect the gravity vector by subjecting the controller to translational accelerati
    • The PS3 controller has 6 degrees of freedom.

      No it doesn't. That's more Sony marketing bullshit.

      The accelerometer portion has 2 axises.. up/down and left/right
      then they count the two analog sticks (2 axises each)!

      6 degrees of freedom... but 2/3 of those axises are the analog sticks.
  • by sm4kxd (683513) on Tuesday May 16, 2006 @12:57PM (#15343388)
    The PS3 is only TILT sensitive. All of the 'movement' that makes the Wii attractive to the people who like it (the tennis game, for example), is NOT POSSIBLE with the PS3. It's NOT motion sensitive, and I wish the media would quit misreporting it. Engadget should be highlighting this difference and they aren't. They way they present the article, it seems they don't even understand the difference themselves.
  • With all this talk of the Wii's motion sensing controller it looks like people have neglected the fact that the console will also have a conventional control pad.

    And what's interesting is how closely that control pad mirrors the layout of the Playstation controller, except that it seems to be a bit more compact and certainly faithful to the look of the Wii.

    One thing I've noticed about the wand is how it seems to be a bit small and some of those buttons are placed so far back on the handle that they certainl

I am the wandering glitch -- catch me if you can.

Working...