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Linux Grows 27.1% in China 224

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the thats-a-lotta-installs dept.
prostoalex writes "Boosted by government purchases and SCO UNIX replacements, Linux grew by 27.1% in China in 2005 and generated $11.8 mln for the companies involved."
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Linux Grows 27.1% in China

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  • piracy (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday April 09, 2006 @09:13AM (#15094675)
    The adoption rate should be higher, but it's not taking into account the people in China who pirate Linux.
  • by IamGarageGuy 2 (687655) on Sunday April 09, 2006 @09:20AM (#15094688) Journal
    But I thought that SCO has a new line of software. If China went exclusivly SCO they would have the potential to rule (sue) the world.
    • ::Cringes::

      Do you really want the Chinese Government conducting economic warfare by proxy?

      It would be a trivial excercise for them to pump a billion U.S. dollars (Thank you China for servicing the National Debt) back into the country in the form of annual licensing fees to patent trolls.

      That much money could fund a small army of lawyers... who could then go about wreaking having by suing everyone in sight. And it wouldn't necessarily be an overt act of warfare, just a license check and a whisper to keep sui
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Wow, that sure is.... underwhelming. China is supposed to be a rather large market.
  • in comparison to.... (Score:5, Informative)

    by eggoeater (704775) on Sunday April 09, 2006 @09:21AM (#15094692) Journal
    I'd like to see the growth stats for pretty much everything else in China....

    I'm willing to bet that MS products grew a lot more than 27%.
    My brother has to go there for business on a regular business. He says they're building the equivalent of New York City every year.

    This is also why we in the US will be paying $5/gallon for gas soon... not because of our demand but because of Asia's demand.

    • "I'm willing to bet that MS products grew a lot more than 27%. [My brother] says they're building the equivalent of New York City every year." What makes you think the chinese build on sand?
    • This is also why we in the US will be paying $5/gallon for gas soon...
      Finally! Time to get real and think about the most wasteful civilization in history ...
      • Time to get real and think about the most wasteful civilization in history ...

        And which would that be, the West which began industrialization in the eighteenth century or the East which began in the twentieth?

    • This is also why we in the US will be paying $5/gallon for gas soon...

      See if I care: I *already* pay $5/gallon *now*...

      • See if I care: I *already* pay $5/gallon *now*...
        It's different. Most places in America, you can't live normally without driving. Sad, perhaps, but true.
        • Well, with my current job I have to do 100km/day too... That adds up, especially because I was dumb enought to buy a sports car six years ago. (When prices were still acceptable and I only had to do 60km/day) With the fuel efficiency of about 25MPG my car has, it hurts... badly... (I manage to get it up to 27.6MPG by driving like a grampa)

          In the US, there seems to be a myth that in Europe one can rely on public transportation all the time. This is true in the big metropolitan areas, but most people sti

          • Well, with my current job I have to do 100km/day too... That adds up, especially because I was dumb enought to buy a sports car six years ago. (When prices were still acceptable and I only had to do 60km/day) With the fuel efficiency of about 25MPG my car has, it hurts... badly... (I manage to get it up to 27.6MPG by driving like a grampa)

            so you've never considered trading it in for something more fuel efficient then??? or getting a job closer to home, or moving closer to your existing job...

            • 1. a point about more efficient car is a good one andi fully agree;
              2. most europeans have VERY different view on a term "house" than americans. for americans, moving to new are isn't something extraordinary - probably the fact that most of families at one point immigrated anyway helps somehow. and the "love for the land" might be even stronger in latvia than in most of the europe.

              here, settling in one place is the goal of most people. families have houses over hundred years old, that have been built by thei
          • This depends what country in Europe you live in. They all do not have uniformly good public transport.

            I lived in Germany, which is head and shoulders above most countries - and even in suburban areas, I could get to a train station on bike within 0-15 minutes. Only the most rural areas had problems (which may contain quite a bit of area but the minority of population).

            If you choose where you live correctly, even in a relatively rural area to get cheaper rent, you should have no problem getting around with
            • In Switzerland there is a specific government policy that almost all people have to be served by public transportation. The population is very dispersed (population 8million, but largest city is only 400 thousand) in villages and small towns, but the transport system is extensive and effective. Not particularly expensive either. For EUR2k you can buy unlimited use of all the public transport in the country for one year (with exclusion of one or two mountain-railways and ski-lifts and the like!).
        • by Kjella (173770) on Sunday April 09, 2006 @10:09AM (#15094852) Homepage
          It's different. Most places in America, you can't live normally without driving. Sad, perhaps, but true.

          For two reasons. One because you're probably the most obese people on earth, which doesn't get any better by you sitting in cars and at desks all day. Getting to the public transportation is tiresome because you don't get the exercise of using public transportation. The 10 minute walk to/from public transportation actually makes a difference.

          Secondly, you don't have much of public transportation because noone would use it. Why should you, your car gets you where you want at almost no cost at all, and I admit the convienience of going exactly when you want it to go, to exactly whereever you're going is an advantage. In order to run it at any profitability, there must be people willing to use it regularly, not as a last ditch emergency when the car breaks down. If you expect public transportation to act as a taxi service on demand, it's not going to happen.

          If you tell me it can't be done, bullshit. Our population density is *half* of yours, we pay about $6/gallon already. Sure, the people in the outskirts need a car but you don't even have proper public transportation where you could. In fact, everything there seems to be designed for driving. Let me take a small detail, last time I was there we bought some stuff in a grocery, and the plastic bags were completely unsuited for carrying. They were barely usable enough to get them out to your car in the parking lot. So if you're stuck in a corner, I'd say that's because you're painting yourself in there. Other countries cope, if you can't you need to blame something else than geography.
          • So if you're stuck in a corner, I'd say that's because you're painting yourself in there.

            Granted. But it's not something individual Americans can choose not to be a part of.

            Anyways, the traditional reason some places have such high gas prices is because their governments have huge gas taxes. But the tax money collected doesn't just disappear; it's spent back into the country, including the people who paid it. High taxes are a pain, but then you figure in things like not having to pay out of pocket f

            • Granted. But it's not something individual Americans can choose not to be a part of.

              Nonsense. The majority of people could easily switch to a non auto-centric lifestyle, if they actually wanted to. Problem is they don't want to. Oh, they say we'd be better off, but they don't want to give up their car. They always have an exuse, regardless of the real necessity of their car. And then we have the folks who swear up and down that the most important right we hold as americans is that of car ownership and that
          • by dalutong (260603) <djtansey@NoSPAM.gmail.com> on Sunday April 09, 2006 @11:55AM (#15095169)
            You forget one more point -- Americans have left the cities for the suburbs (and now the "ex"urbs) over the past 50 years. American's are big on property and personal space. I grew up in China and got very used to always been within a couple of feet of someone. When I came to America in '99 I was chastised regularly for walking or standing too close to someone.

            I also noticed the envy people had with large yards -- something you can only get far away from cities (for affordable prices.) I think some of this is the "keeping up with the jones'" effect -- everyone in america feels they are middle class, and so no one accepts that they can't afford a house with a yard. so they find a place where they can.

            That and people here like bargains. They are happy to drive 20+ minutes to go to the discount shops.

            And T.V. I can't remember what the exact numbers are, but the average household has the T.V. on for something like 8 hours. But when you live in the sub/ex-urbs... what else is there to do? You can play in parks, I guess. But you can't really walk anywhere else.
            • You forget one more point -- Americans have left the cities for the suburbs (and now the "ex"urbs) over the past 50 years. American's are big on property and personal space.

              It's about getting away from the percieved increased crime of urban areas and - unfortunately for some - certain racial/ethnic groups. As those same problems/people move outwards as well (not that they are connected in any way) the people also try to move further out, generally using beuracratic or financial barriers to try and slow fol
            • Americans have left the cities for the suburbs (and now the "ex"urbs) over the past 50 years.

              The middle class began moving out of the cities as soon as soon as commuter rail service, steam and electric lines, made it feasible. 1880-1900.

              Sears, Roebuck sold suburban kit homes out of a catalog from 1911 to 1933.

              $700 for a summer cottage, $4400 for a substantial colonial style house, in 1927. Sears would finance construction at 6%, no money down. 300,000 were built and many survive.

              Gas and rubber rationi

              • You can view information on those homes and some images of all the styles and prices here [searsarchives.com]. It's pretty fascinating, but keep in mind the prices may have increased since 1940.
          • For two reasons. One because you're probably the most obese people on earth, which doesn't get any better by you sitting in cars and at desks all day. Getting to the public transportation is tiresome because you don't get the exercise of using public transportation. The 10 minute walk to/from public transportation actually makes a difference.

            Kjella, I think we have spoken before, you are Norwegian right? I recently got back from a trip to Europe, so I would like to point out a few things. One, Americans are

          • It's different. Most places in America, you can't live normally without driving. Sad, perhaps, but true.

            First of all, I totally disagree with the premise of this post. Cars are a good thing. They allow people to travel and get a broader perspective, enjoy time with their families, communte to work, be more productive, etc. But enough of stating the obvious. It's true that they emit CO2, but were quickly solving this problem as we speak and hybrids cut the emissions down by a lot. I would not be surprised
            • I'm not sure it's fair to say gasoline is taxed excessively (outside America); automobile use, and indirectly gasoline consumption, is tied to a lot of negative side effects, not least the development of sprawl in the built environment. Sprawl is massively inefficient and unsustainable beyond a certain point. "Massively inefficient" not only because of the costs of transportation, but also because urban living simply conserves more energy in terms of heating and cooling (think surface area to volume ratio)
          • by Knuckles (8964) <`gro.naitnad' `ta' `selkcunk'> on Sunday April 09, 2006 @01:10PM (#15095405)
            In fact, everything there seems to be designed for driving.

            The car culture creates a pull towards car-friendlyness. If people have cars, distances grow. Studies at the Technical University Vienna have shown that the average time we spend for transportation is pretty much constant. If you can go faster, you go farther.

            Therefor in a car culture, the shops move to the outskirts where they have less costs, and get away with it because people can drive there for the cheaper prices. The shops offer bigger and bigger packages of household goods, to be chearper, and because people drive there as rarely as possible. The parking lots are huge. The local shops go bankrupt. Suddenly you can't go shopping without a car.

            Other example: cars make streets deserted. If people use cars a lot in a city, it gets lonely on the streets. Instead of walking together, people drive by each other. In addition, the noise makes the residents turn away from the street. They close windows, try to be in rooms away from the street. Given time, the architecture will change and turn inwards, presenting cold walls to the outside, with only bathroom and hallway windows. The bed and living room windows face to a courtyard or similar.
            These changes slowly make the streets uncomfortable and possibly dangerous, and gradually more people switch to cars. Soon there is no space for pedestrians any more, let alone a sidewalk, or anything to walk to.
            • Part of it is a zoning problem. For some reason, many communities for many years have designated specific "commercial" zones or "residential" zones, and never the twain did meet. Obviously, it makes more sense to create mixed zones to allow shops to spring up in walking distance of the houses. In fact, this is starting to become in vogue again, albeit in upscale condo communities, but that's still progress, right?
            • Except if the government does something about it. Where I live, entering the city with a car costs 2$. Cars are really heavily taxed. There are strict parking rules: e.g. park in an unauthorized space costs 100$. On the other side, public transportation.is good. I take the underground to the ski station during winter and the bus (or bike) to the beach in the summer. I bike to my office in the summer, and sometimes walk (45 min) when the weather allows it. And yet I live in a capital.

              The result: I, like many
              • Very much agreed. I have lived most of my life in Vienna, Austria, and only ca. 50% of households own a car there. And guess what, you don't need one either :) Now I'm in Berlin. The city is so big area-wise, still by far not finished after the big changes in the 90ies, and the municipality more or less bankrupt. I couldn't get anything done here without a car, and the company pays for it anyway, so ...

                One of the reasons why US cities are so bad in terms of public transport is in my other post [slashdot.org]
          • The 10 minute walk to/from public transportation actually makes a difference.

            For me it's probably more like a 2 hour walk, because -- like the vast majority of Americans -- I live in the suburbs (and I'm a college student living with my parents, so I have no choice in the matter, thankyouverymuch!). The nearest bus station is something like 8 miles away.

            I am not overweight at all, let alone obese, but public transportation is still not a reasonable option for me. In fact, because of the particular side

        • If only bicycles would be legalised in the U.S
      • See if I care: I *already* pay $5/gallon *now*...

        Offtopic, but its sunday and not much action is going on here.

        Yes, Americans do pay less for gas than probably anywhere else in the world, but like everything else, things are relative. Here are the differences between your gas price and ours:

        1) We use more, we get volume discount.

        2) We essentially own much of the oil in either owning companies like Exxon, and we do produce 40% of our own oil.

        3) We drive more. Its a cultural thing. Public transportation is
    • This is also why we in the US will be paying $5/gallon for gas soon... not because of our demand but because of Asia's demand.

      Yeah, if the restof the world would just stick to bicycles and donkeys, Americans could carry on driving 10 mile/gallon SUVs practically for free. It's so unfair that the rest of the world thinks they should have cars too.
      • Americans could carry on driving 10 mile/gallon SUVs practically for free. It's so unfair that the rest of the world thinks they should have cars too.

        You may or may not realize this, but a large number of motor vehicles in Asia and Africa are either big trucks or passenger cars w/tiny 1~2 liter engines.

        What they lack in engine size, they make up for in quantity. I'm not even sure you could find a car in the U.S. that has a motor less than 1.8 liters. Almost everywhere but America, you'll get a huge number o

        • I'm not even sure you could find a car in the U.S. that has a motor less than 1.8 liters.

          • Chevrolet Aveo: 1.6L
          • Dodge Caliber: 1.8L
          • Honda Civic: 1.8L
          • Honda Civic Hybrid: 1.3L
          • Honda Fit: 1.5L
          • Honda Insight: 1.0L
          • Hyundai Accent: 1.6L (I drive one of these)
          • Kia Rio: 1.6L
          • Lotus Elise: 1.8L
          • Mini Cooper: 1.6L
          • Nissan Sentra: 1.8L
          • Nissan Versa: 1.8L
          • Scion xA: 1.5L
          • Scion xB: 1.5L (my dad drives one of these)
          • Toyota Yaris: 1.5L
          • Toyota Corolla: 1.8L
          • Toyota Prius: 1.5L

          Note that these are all current-model cars; there's even a wider

      • I didn't make the $5/gallon remark as a complaint although that's obviously how it came across. I was just using it as an example of the amount of growth there and it's impacts.

        If I had my way, there'd be more tax on gas, a luxury tax on any vehicle that got less than 25 mpg, and a LOT more rules that force the oil companies to also provide alternative fuels to gas stations for hybrid fuel cars.

        Yes, Asia will impact our economy by both driving up gas prices and providing goods at dirt cheap prices.
        • On the other hand, a lot of foreign investment in the United States maufacturing sector was driven by comparatively cheap energy costs. People seem to focus solely on passenger vehicles when discussing energy use: sure, go back to the 70's during the original "energy crisis" and it's true ... high prices encourage the manufacture and sale of smaller, more efficient passenger vehicles. Duh. However, there's a lot more to a major industrial economy than cars. A lot more. And I don't think you realize the impa
          • However, there's a lot more to a major industrial economy than cars. A lot more. And I don't think you realize the impact upon your lifestyle that higher energy cost is going to have. Virtually everything you buy involves power and petroleum products (plastics, for example) somewhere in the manufacturing chain.

            Not to mention the distribution chain, where the vast majority of goods are shipped via truck (because even though trains are more efficient, and could be made even more so by electrifying the rails

            • Not to mention the distribution chain

              No, let's mention it, and you're right. Transportation costs are going up. I know the vending machines at the company where I work are getting more expensive. The dude who refills them twice a week said it's because they're passing on increased fuel costs to their customers. Of course, all of their suppliers are doing the same thing, and so on up the line.

              I dunno if converting the rail system to electric would be any more efficient than the diesel-electrics we have
    • This is also why we in the US will be paying $5/gallon for gas soon... not because of our demand but because of Asia's demand.

      Speak for yourself. True, Asia has a high demand, but very low demand per person, Asia has a lot more people.

      China has the most stringent automobile fuel economy standard in the world. For large countries, the US is the #1 energy consumer in the world per capita. Next highest is Japan at one third the energy consumed per person as the US. The fewy countries that consume more ener
    • China's Linux policy is part of their strategic growth plan. A nationally funded company develops a flavor of Linux that's very suitable for Chinese gov't use. Microsoft is an American Company, and there's no reason not to believe that they will never help the American government to spy on Chinese government. Linus provides a level-plane playing field for the Chinese government to have control over their own software. Given that Chinese state controlled companies and governments are the largest buyer of leg
  • Hmmm interesting (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Spy der Mann (805235)
    In a country where megacorporations cannot lobby or pressure the government to make certain choices, the natural result is that the government chooses the cheapest product. In the case of Linux, this also turns to be a much safer product than the one most used (Windows). I'm afraid this will give chinese hackers and spammers an advantage over the US.

    I wonder now if choosing the right OS is becoming a matter of national security. In any case, I really hope this news gives a nudge to the US, saying "see? The
    • In any case, I really hope this news gives a nudge to the US, saying "see? The chinese use it, why shouldn't we?"

      Not really. If anything, this could give Microsoft more ammo to tell the government Linux is wrong.
      "China uses Linux, and China is oppressive, therefore, Linux is helping oppress people. That's why we should use Windows instead."
      I'm not saying that Microsoft would directly say that, but I'm betting Microsoft will at least try to use this news to their advantage.
    • Oh yea, USA loves to think like that. "China's doing it so it must be a good idea."
    • by Jetekus (909605)
      True, but at least megacorporations don't randomly throw people in prison (e.g. Thet Win Aung)...

      And when megacorps behave badly at least there are people trying to do something about it - most of the Chinese people at my university (Cambridge, UK) don't seem to be aware / care about the terrible human rights breaches that go on back home.

      I know where I'd rather live.

    • "If you value your National, Corporate, or Personal Security, you WILL get of off ms windoze (the USA's backdoor into your nation, corporation, or home) and use something the USA cannot demand the overseas backdoor encryption access to (ostensibly in the name of hunting criminals...)"

      Now, for China, Australia, Japan, Korea... ANY place where there IS or CAN be potential for the US to "wage battlespace war" on these people, they MUST, as a right to national sovereignty and dignity and national, corporate and
  • Chump change (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward
    IDC forecasts China's Linux market will grow at a CAGR of 34.0% from 2006 to 2010, and reach $51.1 mln by 2010

    Imressive growth numbers, but a 51.1 million dollar market is puny. ( Especially, if you consider that there's 1.2 Billion people in China. ) Hopefully, it'll grow large enough to warrant the large investment needed to market over there.

    You see, for a small company such as mine, I don't have the resources to park there until the market is large enough to support my operations - unlike IBM, MS, SA

    • Remember young padawan, necessity is the mother of innovation.

      That's kind of the whole falacy with the globalization raising everyone'sstandard of living.

      Wrong again young padawan! There's something called a local economy. Every nation has one.
    • Also, if we in the US are using 25% of the resources (inputs) and we're only 5% of the world's population, how can 100% of the world live like US? They can't. everyone's standard of living will have to be reduced (I'm trying - I'm using much less fuel and food!)

      I agree with the reduction in standard of living. Less fuel, food (and reduced power usage) will help out a lot.

      As for the work thing, the best resource I can suggest is opening up an Indian office and hiring a few people here. Now, if the Indian gov
      • I agree with the reduction in standard of living. Less fuel, food (and reduced power usage) will help out a lot.

        Capitalism resolves these kinds of issues with efficancy. Look at the recent popularity of hybrids in the U.S. Combine hybrids with expensive (but very light) composite materials, not to mention smaller engines, and you've got SUVs that get 40 MPG (the lexus hybrid SUV gets low 30s, IIRC).

        In the intermediate term, it looks like the American solution to fuel constraints is going to be BioFuel (no,
        • Global warming. Using _less_ energy will help a lot more.
          • Huh?

            Why is that?

            Mankind's heat output in the forseeable future is neglible, including extreme possibilities like global nuclear war.

            What you mean is to discontinue the use of fossil fuels. A more refined way of looking at is to insure that our energy sources are carbon neutral.

            BioFuel is carbon neutral, and doesn't require us to replace our existing energy infrastructure. In the long run, nuclear (fission/fusion) and solar can provide unlimited amounts of energy.

            The path of utilizing less energy is a dead e
    • I'm all ears for anyone who says the a small company can survive in this environment - please post solution.

      *shrug* We do....

      We're a small company. [yahoo.com] Very small. We manufacture "green" surfactants, organic fertilizer, energy drinks, and license/develop our proprietary remediation technology.

      Our website is crapped up at the moment, and we have a very small marketing staff. Strangely, however, 80%+ of our business is overseas, either in terms of sourcing materials or actually selling product. Our primary custom
  • heh (Score:5, Funny)

    by popeguilty (961923) <popeguilty@NoSPAM.gmail.com> on Sunday April 09, 2006 @09:29AM (#15094712)
    [obligatory joke about how Free Software == communism]
    • Darl McBride is right, and Linux is a Communist Plot!
    • Ruthless corporate exploitation of "cheap labor" could also seem to make "current US-style capitalism" seem like "communism in capitalist clothes".

      What I mean is this: in the old day, much of US production was IN the US. Little made for use HERE was manufactured outside, until we got Mego and Hasbro products cheaply made in Taiwan, or Hong Kong, or a FEW other places. Even b4 the 70's, it seems LITTLE was made outside the US to be shipped back here.

      Now, with "globalization" (nothing new, it's just more perv
  • Server or Desktop (Score:5, Insightful)

    by CSHARP123 (904951) on Sunday April 09, 2006 @09:30AM (#15094717)
    This article do not have much information. Is the server software or the desktop software that is gaining hold there? Linux has always grown in server market. IMHO, Growth in Desktop market will be a great deal as that helps the growth of the Linux much faster than server growth.
  • by rg3 (858575) on Sunday April 09, 2006 @09:32AM (#15094723) Homepage
    I'm curious to know, since I have no idea about the topic, what does market revenue (which is what grew 27.1% according to TFA) exactly mean and how does it relate to the number of people or computers using or running Linux.
  • by Mr2001 (90979) on Sunday April 09, 2006 @09:38AM (#15094742) Homepage Journal
    I don't read Chinese, so I can only respond to the email advertisements I get in English, but I've tried them all and *I* sure haven't grown 27.1%... maybe I should hire a translator.
  • These revenue reports just say "Some geezer made some money off of selling Linux this year". Who cares about that? I want to know how much the number of installed computers increased by.
  • It is obvious the money sum is not impressive even for slashdotters here, however the strategic gain is somewhere else: by using Linux, China already spared some billions of dollars need not be payed for Microsoft Windows. That's another small drop helping to keep up the huge trade deficit of the opponent empire with them.
    • the money sum is not impressive even for slashdotters here, however the strategic gain is somewhere else: by using Linux, China already spared some billions of dollars need not be payed for Microsoft Windows

      There is no great gain if Linux running on commodity hardware is simply replacing Unix and big iron in the back office.

      Windows generates a lot of employment and export dollars for China. Don't be surprised if the government's commitment to Linux is something less than total.

  • by suv4x4 (956391) on Sunday April 09, 2006 @09:58AM (#15094810)
    After long, exhausting and expensive research, China has found out how to buy a free product.
  • Rinux (Score:2, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward
    is the distro they run in China.
  • Linux grew on my computer 100% two years ago, but than it stagnated.

  • I am trying to collect some Chinese resources about Linux with laptops, PDAs and mobile phones [tuxmobil.cn]. But I didn't get much submissions yet.
  • Okay 11 Mil? Really? (Score:2, Informative)

    by benbranch (930283)
    I live in China. Seriously. 11 Million is like peanuts around here, this country is exploding at a phenomenal rate and to be honest the adoption of 3 ply toilet paper is higher than 27% and it makes a lot more than 11 Million a year. I don't beleive this can be right.
    • We were talking about this at coffee today. $11.8 million is probably the lunch budget for Dell execs. I guess in a way it's a good thing, but getting excited about it does seem a bit premature.
  • this is just the growth rate of linux and not the market share. i would like to see a full analysis of market share compared to other systems.

    frankly speaking, 27.1% growth is pretty small for me. in absolute terms, it may be even measly in terms of numbers compared to the adoption of other countries. given the $11.8 million, i believe it should be way bigger than that given china's size.

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