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Bring Home the Biotech Bacon 216

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the probably-tastes-like-cardboard dept.
Wired is reporting that researchers may have found the key to "heart friendly bacon." From the article: "Geneticists have mixed DNA from the roundworm C. elegans and pigs to produce swine with significant amounts of omega-3 fatty acids -- the kind believed to stave off heart disease. Researchers hope they can improve the technique in pork and do the same in chickens and cows. In the process, they also want to better understand human disease."
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Bring Home the Biotech Bacon

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  • Fatty (Score:3, Insightful)

    by mr100percent (57156) * on Monday March 27, 2006 @03:37AM (#15001107) Homepage Journal
    Still, the pork has way too much fat to be healthy. You can still get trichonosis or tapeworm from infected meat, like regular pork. It's still not kosher or halal either.
    • Re:Fatty (Score:3, Funny)

      by sexylicious (679192)
      You can still get trichonosis or tapeworm from infected meat, like regular pork.

      But if that's the case, you could market it as a weight-loss program too!
    • That's what I say. I would rather throw some Salmon on my George Forman to get the omega-3 than buy pork meat from some genetic lab. I like pork but as I am getting older it is time to start eating healthy -- better later than never...
      • Salmon?

        Wild salmon as most oceanic top predators accumulates all the flame retardants, dioxins, etc we dump in the Arctic nowdays. I would seriously think twice before eating it unless it is from the North Pacific. Same for any Arctic and North Atlantic fish.

        Farmed salmon is not much better either. It is stuffed with antibiotics and has dioxin levels way above what should be considered normal.

        If you want to eat non-carcinogenic and antibiotic free omega-rich fish eat white trout (in Russian "Sig") which is
      • Aside from Salmon having elevated levels of just about everything bad (including our good friend mercury) - you can't eat it all the time anyway. Five nights a week of salmon isn't appealing to me (as much as I love salmon.)

        There's nothing wrong with some ham or pork tenderloin having some of the good stuff in it too, since occasionally I'll eat the other white meat.
      • I first ate Mahi Mahi on a trip to California. It was the catch of the day. White meat fish, delicious. It doesn't have that "fishy" taste that tuna or salmon. Grilled or baked... so very good!
    • Re:Fatty (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Duckman5 (665208)
      It's still not kosher or halal either.

      Which is exactly why I've been saying the next step should be to genetically engineer a pig with multiple stomachs so it can chew it's cud. Mmmm...kosher bacon.
    • by mrjb (547783)
      You can still get trichonosis or tapeworm from infected meat
      Then cook it (the meat, not the tapeworm. Then again, cooked tapeworm should make for a pretty good source of protein).
    • sigh... apparently, this is one of those government and business promulgated myths that is going to take years to undo, if even undoable. There are a ton of "scientists" out there who are emotionally and economically dependent on the current established "truth". Bad science is killing us all. But, here's the pointer. Read it.

      Study Finds Low-Fat Diet Won't Stop Cancer or Heart Disease [nytimes.com]

      Returning natural amounts of fat to our diet is essential for getting our weight back under control. As we've reduced o

    • "You can still get trichonosis or tapeworm from infected meat, like regular pork."

      Both trichinosis and tapeworm are now extremely rare in commercial hogs, which is why many restaurants will serve pork at a 'medium' doneness if asked.

      Even if you purchase meat from an infected hog, cooking thoroughly will prevent infection by parasites.

      Not that I'd advocate eating pork sushi, but pork is much safer than people believe.
  • Risks? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mtenhagen (450608) on Monday March 27, 2006 @03:38AM (#15001111) Homepage
    And then in 20 years we will discover that this 'adjusted' meat will cause cancer or 'mad-human disease'
  • by BadAnalogyGuy (945258) <BadAnalogyGuy@gmail.com> on Monday March 27, 2006 @03:38AM (#15001112)
    Good for us... Not so good for the pig or the rabbit.

    Vincent: Want some bacon?
    Jules: No man, I don't eat pork.
    Vincent: Are you Jewish?
    Jules: Nah, I ain't Jewish, I just don't dig on swine, that's all.
    Vincent: Why not?
    Jules: Pigs are filthy animals. I don't eat filthy animals.
    Vincent: Bacon tastes gooood. Pork chops taste gooood.
    Jules: Hey, sewer rat may taste like pumpkin pie, but I'd never know 'cause I wouldn't eat the filthy motherfucker. Pigs sleep and root in shit. That's a filthy animal. I ain't eat nothin' that ain't got enough sense enough to disregard its own faeces.
    Vincent: How about a dog? Dogs eats its own feces.
    Jules: I don't eat dog either.
    Vincent: Yeah, but do you consider a dog to be a filthy animal?
    Jules: I wouldn't go so far as to call a dog filthy but they're definitely dirty. But, a dog's got personality. Personality goes a long way.
    Vincent: Ah, so by that rationale, if a pig had a better personality, he would cease to be a filthy animal. Is that true?
    Jules: Well we'd have to be talkin' about one charmin' motherfuckin' pig. I mean he'd have to be ten times more charmin' than that Arnold on Green Acres, you know what I'm sayin'?
    • by dalroth5 (63007) on Monday March 27, 2006 @05:01AM (#15001341)
      Hello folks.
      I really can't let this one go by.

      "Pigs sleep and root in shit. That's a filthy animal."

      No. When humans are confined without the means to stay clean (think gaol) they too sleep in shit. Does that make humans filthy animals? Clearly not. Equally clearly, when pigs live out in the wild they shun excrement just like you and I do.

      "I wouldn't go so far as to call a dog filthy but they're definitely dirty."

      No. A dog is merely doing what other animals do with a food which is difficult to digest: they re-digest it. Cattle do the same; but they don't have to shit it out first because they have multiple stomachs. It's called 'cud'. Do you drink milk? Do you eat butter and cheese?

      If freshly dropped shit was harmful, you'd be ill already, wouldn't you? Please remember that your own, personal, filthy shit just came out of the middle of your nicely-clean-on-the-outside body. You and I are both literally full of shit. :) So is everybody else. In fact, the only humans who aren't full of shit are the starving millions in the Third World. Do you want to cleanse yourself? Stop eating for about a week. OK? No, I thought not.

      Special thought for the day just for you: "I am glad and grateful to be full of shit."

      Thanks for your time.
      • > Do you drink milk? Do you eat butter and cheese?

        No, they are disgusting.
      • One objection to your statement: e. coli. It's used in later portions of the human intestine to aid digestion. It's fine if it stays in the intestine, but it can kill if it's allowed into the upper digestive tract (just ask Jack-in-the-Box!)

        Freshly dropped human shit is in fact pretty bad for you.

        All your other points are spot on.
      • Live until you're 50, then get ready for The Camera.

        Go home from work 24 hours ahead, and take your Fleet's Phospho-Soda. Then enjoy jello, Gatorade, etc for the next 24 hours, but NEVER let yourself get very far from the toilet. You'll get cleaned out.

        Then go into Ambulatory Care for the Grand Finale.

        However, there quite a bit of peace of mind in being told, "Everything looks good, come back in 8 to 10 years."
      • by Liam Slider (908600) on Monday March 27, 2006 @10:25AM (#15002448)
        A dog is merely doing what other animals do with a food which is difficult to digest: they re-digest it
        Uh-huh....now explain to me their whole cat shit fetish Mr. Wizard. They'll snarf that shit down like it was candy.
    • And, you know that nice thing called 'fertilizer' that gets put on all the veggies that you buy at the supermarket? A lot of that came in bags marked 'manure'.

      And for your piece of mind, I seriously suggest that you don't look that one up in the dictionary.
  • Doh ! (Score:5, Informative)

    by sane? (179855) on Monday March 27, 2006 @03:39AM (#15001115)
    You can just imagine all those marketeers and press people who were planning to use Omega-3 as a marketing tool when they read this recent article [bbc.co.uk].

    As they say in the marketing rulebook: Timing is everything

    • That won't stop them.

      They're still marketing it as 'super brain food' based on one study that found if you fed children decent food in the morning instead of crap they did slightly better at school.

      If you were to believe the marketing the only thing this stuff doesn't do is raise the dead... and I suspect they're working on that.
    • That article that you and many of the other people here are linking to is largely irrelevant. It's true that there have been many people making wild-ass claims about how Omega-3 fatty acids can stave off heart disease without enough clinical data to correlate that claim. Recent work like that you cite suggests that those claims are -1 overrated.

      Regardless, it's still true that the average diet in countries like the US is lacking in O-3 fatty acids, and that there are other health problems that can result
      • You can just buy Omega-3 vegetable oil and use it as a you would use other oils for cooking.

        Then you don't have to kill anything or mutate the poor fuckers.

        > In the process, they also want to better understand human disease.
        So they can invent more pointless "hey it's got chemical X in it" foods when all it takes is a balanced diet and not "new Health Coke".
    • It seems to me that the recent study, which was a review of other studies, largely concluded that most studies were not robust enough to be useful, and also that they did not take into account the fact that people that eat oily fish, probably have a better diet anyway.

      All that said there seems to be a growing view (and one that seems reasonable to me) that suggests that taking the apparently beneficial component of a food in isolation may simply not work. In this context eating Omega-3 when it occurs in Oil
  • by hobotron (891379) on Monday March 27, 2006 @03:40AM (#15001119)

    We get bacon with worms?

    I think someone didn't run this by marketing.

  • by Threni (635302) on Monday March 27, 2006 @03:43AM (#15001123)
    > omega-3 fatty acids -- the kind believed to stave off heart disease.

    Er...no it's not:

    http://society.guardian.co.uk/health/story/0,,1738 599,00.html [guardian.co.uk]
    • Man, it's crazy reading these health stories. The reports flip-flop back and forth and nobody seems to agree. You can find a study or expert to support completely conflicting theories. What are we to think? I certainly wouldn't dismiss Omega 3 based on this latest study... we've got data going both ways now. Which is wrong? Which is right?

      The pattern I usually see in these studies is that after controlling for and isolating a particular dietary component, they find it has no benefit, and that the orig
      • We're a "silver bullet" society, I fear.

        As for our family, we tried to eat a varied diet, keep up with the 5 servings of fruits/vegetables a day, and get exercise. We also cook mostly from scratch, so most of what we eat has 3 or fewer syllables.

        None of us are fat, and we're all pretty healthy.
      • You know you're old when you remember when bacon, eggs, and sunshine were good for you
        And incidentally, they're already back to saying that eggs are good for you...

        I too find the flip-flopping of nutrition to be vexing. Myself, I manage by eating whatever I'm craving and I try to eat in large quantities and with variety. *wry grin* That said, I only pull off the large quantities because my family has a metabolism more in line for a mongoose, but eh...

        I'm a personal believer in that if you eat what yo

    • And nevermind the fact that the whole idea that Omega-3 fatty acids reduce the risk of heart attack has always been a poor assumption based on poor science, the result of going on a, well, fishing expedition, for a correlation and stopping when they found one in the fat, with no particular justification for the fat being where the relevant correlation was to be found in the first place.

      And, repeat after me: Correlation is not causation.

      The most obvious difference to me between Greek and Inuit cultures (the
  • by Elessar (8997)
    This may not be so great. This recent story http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4838086.stm/ [bbc.co.uk] casts doubts on the benefits of omega-3.
  • good for us (Score:5, Insightful)

    by pintomp3 (882811) on Monday March 27, 2006 @03:49AM (#15001143)
    not to sound like some peta activist (i'm carniverous to a fault) but how does it effect the life of the animal? i guess it's kind of like veil where not do you live to be slaughtered, but perhaps also live bad life too.
    • Re:good for us (Score:3, Insightful)

      by tpgp (48001)
      not to sound like some peta activist (i'm carniverous to a fault) but how does it effect the life of the animal?

      You're going to get a million people replying to you saying variations of "what does it matter? The pig is going to die"

      It's a question that society has to start thinking about - many people (like the parent poster) have no problem eating meat, but are concerned about the life of the animal prior to it being butchured.

      Its a valid concern, and not hypocritical at all - there's an enormous gap betwe
    • So, as a carnivore, you eat NO vegetables, fruit, seeds, nuts, pulses or grains ?

    • i guess it's kind of like veil where not do you live to be slaughtered, but perhaps also live bad life too.
      Anybody else flashing back to the Dish of the Day [wikipedia.org] from HHGttG?
    • Re:good for us (Score:3, Informative)

      by porcupine8 (816071)
      You don't sound like a PeTA activist at all. You sound like someone concerned about animal welfare - a movement totally separate from the animal rights philosophies that PeTA et al are espousing. Animal rights activists say humans have no right to use other animals in any way, shape, or form (including food, research, fur, pets) - animal welfare activists say we have the right to use animals, but that right comes with the responsibility to minimize their suffering whenever possible.

      In other words, welcome

  • Wait 20 years (Score:5, Insightful)

    by CosmeticLobotamy (155360) on Monday March 27, 2006 @03:52AM (#15001149)
    I doubt regular bacon would disappear overnight or anything, but virtually every time someone comes out and says, "X-inol in corn prevents fin rot," five years later it's common knowledge that X-inol just makes food taste funny. If in twenty years, Omega-3 is still thought to make people healthy, then go adding it to things. For now, odds are you'll just end up with birth defects and adult acne.
  • Trade-offs (Score:5, Insightful)

    by quokkapox (847798) <quokkapox@gmail.com> on Monday March 27, 2006 @03:56AM (#15001158)
    Is it just me, or are we trying to over-optimize our diets? Why not just try to eat what we evolved to eat, what you in particular tolerate well, whatever makes your body run reasonably well.

    You can devote a silly amount of time trying to eat an optimal, low-calorie, lowfat, high-protein, perfectly-whatever sort of diet.

    What does that gain you? Is all that time and energy worth it, when, if you get it right, you'll probably just die of something else instead? Sheesh, live a little. Have some bacon once in awhile, have some ice cream for dessert now and then. If you eat too much of something, your body will let you know anyway.

    Respect your body's intuition, and get some exercise. There's millions of years of research to back that up.

    • this isn't about optimized diets, it's about being able to eat for pleasure and not suffering the consequences. our bodies seek out fatty foods and stores the extra energy because it was needed a long time ago. with the current level of abundance (in some parts of the world), we no longer eat for just sustianance. we eat for pleasure also. just look at the types of things we eat and the quantiy we eat. the body doesn't really say "enough of this particular food".
      • this isn't about optimized diets, it's about being able to eat for pleasure and not suffering the consequences. our bodies seek out fatty foods and stores the extra energy because it was needed a long time ago. with the current level of abundance (in some parts of the world), we no longer eat for just sustianance. we eat for pleasure also. just look at the types of things we eat and the quantiy we eat. the body doesn't really say "enough of this particular food".

        "Eating for pleasure"? If you eat a quart

        • "I love caffeinated soda but if I chug two liters of Code Red, I know I'll get sick from the excess caffeine or sugar. So I drink a couple ounces and stop. Having more is just stupid."

          I won't drink caffeine. That doesn't mean scientists were wasting their time for making caffeine free sodas like Sprite. If my only choice was cola or water, I would choose water. If given the between traditional red meat, and red meat whose fat content was replaced with Omega-3 fatty acids, I would choose the latter. Healt

    • Re:Trade-offs (Score:3, Insightful)

      by bozho (676988)
      I agree.

      It's amusing to observe what was considered healthy throughout history. "Drinking donkey urine/bathing in virgin blood will grant you eternal youth!", "High-fiber diet reduces colon cancer risk!"

      One of the recent ones was sent to me by a dentist friend - a radioactive toothpaste (1940ies):
      http://www.orau.org/ptp/collection/quackcures/toot hpaste.htm [orau.org]

      From the advertisment sample that I have:
      "RADIOACTIVE TOOTHPASTE - CREATES NATURAL FRESHNESS"

      "Gentle rays of Radium are active for 4 hours after applicat
    • The problem is that those millions of years were in another environment - we didn't use to live in the enormous year round abundance of food we have now.

      Our body's intuition says to stock up on fat for the harsh times, it says sweet = always good, fat = always good. Eat the food you can get before the next famine strikes.

      We know what the ideal diet is - eat with the season, in tremendous variety, use meats in moderation, eat lots of fruit and vegetables, prefer wholewheat grains over processed flour, vege

    • Optimization of my diet makes my body run much better.

      And eating what I am evolved to eat isn't an option: I'm evolved to eat a mixture of things that grow up in a totally mixed environment (no farming, other types of plants next to it), nuts, occasionally game, occasionally fish.

      The trouble is that the earth can only support about 100 million people living this way. Which 98% do we kill off?

      Eivind.

  • Can anyone else smell a marketing stunt behind it?

    I mean, let's face it, considering the average person in so called "developed countries", there's no such thing as healthy fat. We simply eat too much of it, no matter how healty it is. You can create "high fructose" stuff as much as you like, it still is sugar. Yes, probably better than "ordinary" beet sugar, but still sugar.

    Same with Omega-3 fat. It's not like you get more healthy by eating more of it. Yeah, it's better than eating that saturated grease, b
    • You can create "high fructose" stuff as much as you like, it still is sugar. Yes, probably better than "ordinary" beet sugar, but still sugar.

      high fructose corn syrup [wikipedia.org] is markedly worse for you than any natural sugar. The main reason HFCS exists is that it's cheaper than real sugar and it doesn't spoil as fast.

      Yes, we need fat in our diet, of course, but it's similar to salt in our diet: In "modern" food, you simply cannot eat too little of it, no matter what you do.

      Essential Fatty Acids are called that bec
      • But I hope we can agree on replacing (almost) all fat in your diet with Omega-3 would still result in too much fat.

        I was also not refering to hfcs, but currently here the marketing goons of various kid food chains are riding the "full of healthy fructose" fad. Which makes me cringe every time I hear it. Fructose is still sugar.

        And O3FS fat is still fat. Yes, it is essential (so is fat, actually), but we already eat far more than enough of the stuff. Yes, we need HDL, but just pumping more of it into you won
    • Those who care about Omega-3 vs. whatever fats are not very likely to eat too much fat. People who actually care enough to know anything about different kinds of fat fal into two different groups - those who know what they're doing and eat very well balanced diets and those who try to eat "healthy food" without seeing the big picture. The former group has no problem whatsoever. The latter group gets half the calories they should and less than a tenth of the fat.

      I've seen newbies on bodybuilding boards who
    • You need to read up a lot more on modern knowledge of nutrition if you think that high fructose corn syrup is healthier than regular sugar and that omega-3 and other polyunsaturated fats are just as unhealthy as saturated fats and should be avoided at all costs.
    • In "modern" food, you simply cannot eat too little of it, no matter what you do.

      I would definitely have to argue with this. In the 90s, when Low Fat was the craze instead of Low Carb, there were plenty of women who were not getting enough fat in their diets. You could get fat-free versions of just about everything, just like you can get low-carb versions now.

      The difference is, in most low-carb breads, pastas, etc, the starches and sugars are replaced by fiber or protein, both of which are at least usefu

  • by melted (227442) on Monday March 27, 2006 @03:59AM (#15001169) Homepage
    I'm afraid of this shit. I love bacon and eggs every now and then, and the same shit could happen with this as with corn - you can't buy non-GM corn flakes anymore unless you shop at an "organic" store and pay twice the price. Leave bacon alone, I say. Or at least clearly mark the non-GM variety so that I'd know which one to buy.
    • All corn is genetically modified. Maize [wikipedia.org] was domesticated thousands of years ago in a process of natural genetic modification. I'm not convinced that our recent addition of resistance to specific herbicides or insect pests is more significant than 10,000 years of gradual change by artificial selection. And all sorts of crazy genetic modifications (via viruses, cross-species pollination, etc.) take place naturally under the radar of our current understanding and observation. It's still corn.
  • by adisakp (705706) on Monday March 27, 2006 @04:07AM (#15001188) Journal
    Now all we need to do is biologically engineer boneless chickens for those tasty "boneless" chicken wings :-)
  • Recently there have been articles that state there is no conclusive evidence that Omega 3 Fatty Acids are beneficial.

    Omega 3 might not be a lifesaver [icnetwork.co.uk]
    Mar 24 2006
    Madeleine Brindley, Western Mail
    SCIENTISTS have cast doubt on whether fish oils can really help protect against heart disease.

    It's interesting that they're using genes from C. elegans [wikipedia.org] which along with the fruit fly, yeast and the mouse make up some of the most throughly studied organisms. I wonder if it's a case of looking for the lost keys u

    • Recently there have been articles that state there is no conclusive evidence that Omega 3 Fatty Acids are beneficial.

      *BZZZZTTT* This is only for heart disease and is slightly inconclusive.

      From the aritcle itself:

      Despite the findings, leading dieticians said the public should not stop eating oily fish as omega 3 is associated with a huge range of health benefits.

      It also states that:
      More research is needed to establish why some studies have shown a slightly increased risk associated with eating very high amo
  • by aepervius (535155) on Monday March 27, 2006 @04:45AM (#15001297)
    This remind me of those nice tomatoe which stay red a lot longer. And taste like water. Methink people concentrate too much on "not dying", and not enough on "living".
  • by canuck57 (662392) on Monday March 27, 2006 @04:48AM (#15001306)

    Far too much is made of these improvements, if they are in fact improvements.

    My grandfather lived to be 92, and died 2 days after playing and dancing to fiddle at a wedding. After having 2 wives and 15 children it is not hard to see why he had a large farm. Being monetarily poor, everything was used and everything made from the farm and without chemicals or bio agents. He was a mixed farmer raising cattle, pigs, chickens and wheat.

    Well, to the point. None of the food, including eggs fried in suet every day, or the grease from the cattle or pig lard in bread, pastries or what amounts to steak-fried chicken ever hurt him. By modern days standards he should have died at 22 of a massive heart attack due to cholesterol alone.

    But one truth appears to be the chemicals, the bio "enhancements" and engineering of foods is what is killing many of us. Growth hormones get passed on through the food chain and tell our bodies to "put it on". Radiation sterilizes but also kills proteins we need and thus we eat more. Nitrate preservatives... The pesticide residues in steady feed but minute ("government accepted levels") linger and pass regularly down the food chain to humans. Who knows, your cow might have been grazed down wind of a chemical processing plant or drank water downstream from another city or chemical use agro farm with god knows what in it.

    It isn't just in livestock like chickens, pork and cattle. Seafood caught after rivers carry out taconite, lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury and a host of other impurities. The shrimp from Thailand to the Cod of the shores of Newfoundland all have similar issues.

    When it comes to tinkering about the food chain, we might want to concern ourselves about a species like the Leopard Frog that is sensitive to mans pollution and bio agents. There used to be lots of them, but haven't seen one for 20 years and I have looked. Never saw tumors in fish until the last 5 years either.

    Finding clean food is increasing becoming a problem. The problem is there are few places to grow clean food.

    • Nice post, and I tend to agree with you.

      People in the past century lived pretty long because they used primarily organic farming (didn't have non-organic methods yet) and also had more physically active jobs.

      I wonder how the life span of baby-boomers and gen Xers will be comparitively. I mean, we are more likely to have desk jobs, and our food just has lots of processed crap, like unsaturated fats, hydrogenated oils, high-fructose corn syrup, remnants of growth enzymes from meat and dairy, etc. And we

      • Actually, you're both wrong: life expectancy has been increasing all along (in the western world at least), and one instance of a man eating a fatty diet and living to a ripe old age with no heart trouble is about as representitive as the smoker who smoked 40 a day and lived to 90 - it's an anomaly.

        Plastics are probably a lot better for us than bare metal, after all, you're not going to get traces of aluminium along with your food (aluminium is a cause of Altzheimer's).

        The evidence shows that progress is pu
    • >Radiation sterilizes but also kills proteins we need and thus we eat more.

      Your digestive system does a good job of "killing" proteins you eat. What, you think you absorb whole proteins from your meal and they magically start doing their thing?


  • They would need to make pork meat with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. That would be nice and healthy. Problem though: I doubt a pig can live consisting of fats that are usually mostly found in plants and vegetable oil. Would that pig have green color? ;)

    • Problem though: I doubt a pig can live consisting of fats that are usually mostly found in plants and vegetable oil.

      The best natural sources of Omega-3 fatty acids are in fish. A lesser known fact is that wild game animals have a lot of polyunsaturated fat in their meat and are actually good sources of Omega-3 fatty acids as well. There are lots of mammals with polyunsaturated fats in their bodies just as there are plants with saturated fats in their seeds. It's not purely an animal/plant divide as a lot
  • GOD BLESS SCIENCE!

    And to all you vegetarians out there, until they make a plant that tastes like bacon, I'm not switching. If God didn't want us to eat animals then why did he cover them in meat?
  • Mmmmmm, woooooooormmm baaaaaacooooon.
  • The Globe and Mail newspaper today has an article about growing meat in a jar. Test products so far taste like "jelly on fabric" ... yum ... http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM .20060327.wxmeat27/BNStory/Science/home [theglobeandmail.com]
  • Just another excuse for the meat and dairy industry to perpetuate the senseless slaughter of these innocent beings; just so you can have your fucking eggs and sausage. It amazes me to no end that most people don't have the intellectual capacity to catch even half a clue. It isn't bad enough that I have to foot the medical bills of people with health problems from eating this shit. Now we have 'science' making flesh that's 'better for you'.

    I could go on, but no one will listen anyway.

  • Or we can just eat bacon and tofu or fish [americanheart.org], maybe in separate dishes the same day or week. That way we'll get the O3FA along with other nutrients, but without the genomic pollution roulette game.

    What does bacon fried in fish oil taste like?
  • What do the religious autorities have to say about this? If I put pig genes in a cow, does it make the cow treyf?

    I think they are putting worm genes in pork. Now the answer to that one is easy.

Thufir's a Harkonnen now.

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