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Inside a TFT Monitor 33

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the inside-out dept.
Keith Williams writes "Ever wondered what's inside your TFT monitor? Bit-Tech took one apart and stripped it down to the panel to find out. There's also some great explanation of the technology that goes into your desktop display."
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Inside a TFT Monitor

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  • Bugs (Score:1, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward
    ""Ever wondered what's inside your TFT monitor?"

    Exploding Caps.
  • by Bralkein (685733) on Monday March 20, 2006 @02:02PM (#14958259)
    One day I was using my computer, when I noticed something strange on the screen. It was a little grey mark, moving about on the screen in a seemingly random fashion. It was a little bug of some kind... but it was actually under the screen! I tried to shoo it out of the monitor, but I accidentally squashed it to death, because I forgot the screen of a TFT is flexible. Now there is a little stain on everything I view, thanks to the tiny insect corpse. This would never have happened if I had bought a CRT instead!
    • by the_humeister (922869) on Monday March 20, 2006 @02:04PM (#14958274)
      That's not a bug, it's a feature!
    • Quick! Someone inform PETA [peta.com] that advanced display technology poses death threats to our sweet, little and innoncent insectoid friends! This kind of development has to be stopped most immediately!
    • I wouldn't say that anything to do with a CRT is a benefit. They're blurry, hot, electricity-hungry and contain a large dangerous vacuum on your desk in front of your eyes, while sitting you right in the direction of an electron gun while firing x-rays out the back.

      No thanks. Good riddance to bad rubbish.
      • Well CRTs are cheaper for one. Secondly, I still think the picture on a typical CRT looks better than an LCD which costs twice as much. Now this may change when you go to the really expensive models but then your spending more money.
      • If the CRT's front surface were to break (you'd have to hit it pretty hard with a hammer or something), exposing the "dangerous vacuum", it would implode, not explode; the glass would get sucked inside. The vacuum is probably the least dangerous thing about a CRT.
        • The glass will experience an inward force *where it breaks*, but an outward force everywhere else as air rushes in and the tensions from the pressure differencial during the inrush "flick" the rest of the screen outward. Normally when you break glass, it shatters and falls down. A CRT is one of the few exceptions where it will fly in your face of its own accord.
          • Normally when you break glass, it shatters and falls down. A CRT is one of the few exceptions where it will fly in your face of its own accord.

            Nonsense.

            Modern CRTs include a bonded, multi-layer faceplate that prevents implosion, and also protects you from one as well.

            Besides, you need a very, very specific (and very unlikely) combination of conditions for it to violently implode. Most of the time, the force of the rushing air won't even break the glass.

      • My six-year-old Iiyama 19" CRT at home performs a lot better than my 3-year-old Iiyama 17" LCD at work. And I'm also not so sure about LCDs being less power-hungry. A friend of mine has a 19" Philips LCD that uses 125 W; just as much as my 19" Iiyama CRT.
        • And I'm also not so sure about LCDs being less power-hungry.

          Yes, LCDs generally use about 50% as much power as CRTs, though that doesn't make-up for their other serious draw-backs.

          A friend of mine has a 19" Philips LCD that uses 125 W; just as much as my 19" Iiyama CRT.

          Those numbers are absolutely insane. You aren't going off the rating on the device are you? My Cheapo 19" CRT only uses 65W. (Also: a 19" LCD is 1" larger than a 19" CRT)

          • Actually those 125 W are what is printed on the little stickers on the devices. I haven't measured the real consumptions, but usually these little stickers are pretty accurate.
            • Actually those 125 W are what is printed on the little stickers on the devices. I haven't measured the real consumptions, but usually these little stickers are pretty accurate.

              My ~65W CRT has a sticker on the back that says 2AMPS!

              In my experience, those stickers haven't been remotely accurate. Perhaps that's absolute peak-voltage at power-up...
  • LCD privacy! (Score:5, Interesting)

    by ShaniaTwain (197446) on Monday March 20, 2006 @02:08PM (#14958313) Homepage
    If you peel the polarizing filter out of a LCD display and make sunglasses out of it, you'll have a display that no one can see without wearing the 'magic glasses'.
    • But... (Score:2, Informative)

      by Sensible Clod (771142)
      if you tilt your head AT ALL, the picture goes wacked.
    • Very true. I remember doing the same with my calculator in 9th grade. Nobody could see what I was doing with it without looking throught he filter.

      Imagine the potential of your idea tho. Would have loved to have this back when the only computer around was in a public room (kinda sucks to turn the screen off every time someone comes in and your watchin porn, I'm not even talking about trying to justify it)

    • There was a luggable PC with this "feature" way back in the 1990s: an LCD screen readable only with a special pair of glasses. Problem was, you had to sit exactly right to see anything. This was a tough proposition if you were using it in the cramped spaces the privacy feature would be most useful in: the subway, airplane, airport, etc. And you couldn't turn it off when you got home, either. Ech.
  • an 'analog hole' .... quick call the MPAA
  • Coming soon in your up-to-the-minute Slashdot:

    - What's inside a floppy disk drive?

    - How magnetic core works

    - What's inside that 8 track player in your car?

    - Inside your Iomega Bernoulli Box

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