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United States The Internet

Internet Plays A Large Role For U.S. Citizens 170

Homework Help writes "The latest U.S. Census Bureau report suggests that the Internet has become an integral part of the American lifestyle and economy." From the article: "It shows 40 percent of U.S. adults used the Web to obtain news, weather or sports information, a dramatic increase from the 7 percent who surfed in 1997, when the bureau conducted a similar study. The report also found that nearly half of adults, 47 percent, used the Internet to find information on products or services. About one-third reported purchasing a product or service online, compared with only 2 percent who did so in 1997."
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Internet Plays A Large Role For U.S. Citizens

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 28, 2005 @09:58AM (#13896198)
    TV also popular.
    Radio popular, but not as popular as it was in the 1930s.
    NFL football quite popular as a spectator sport.
  • WTF? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by suso (153703) * on Friday October 28, 2005 @10:00AM (#13896210) Homepage Journal
    What the hell? The last time they conducted a simular study was 1997? 96-97 was when the Internet really started to take off. How can they expect to show any kind of useful information if they don't do a study like that every year or every other year. Its like saying that in 1905 only 7% of people used cars and now in 2005 99% of people use them, so cars play a big role in people's lives.

    I thought our government was gathering more useful statistics, but I guess not.
    • Why not? If that time was when businesses began the land rush to the web and at the same time was when people began realizing the power of being able to purchase online, why not start there?

      The U.S. census is only done every 10 years yet it shows vital statistics and patterns.

      I realize you were hoping for a once a year survey but all that would have shown is the gradual climb in user statistics. A ten year survey is fine for this purpose.
      • From TFA, the information released was actually from data collected in 2003, so the interval was more like six years. The information is likely of even less "use" since things have probably changed a bit even since then.

        Not sure the information is all that useful to the public in general anyway other than as an interesting tidbit. If XYZ company wants to get useful data to develop an online strategy they can pay for their own study.

        • Not sure the information is all that useful to the public in general anyway other than as an interesting tidbit.
          If only it were just an interesting tidbit. Give it a few days and someone will make a big deal out if it.

          "Not only is Mississippi crapped on by hurricanes, the Bush administration and racism, they also don't have enough internet!"

    • Re:WTF? (Score:3, Insightful)

      by eobanb (823187)
      It's the US Census, what did you expect? I concede that a study like this isn't really that interesting, but it's still nice to have official numbers instead of just random speculation. If an ISP conducted this study, they might be more able to do it yearly, but would their numbers be as trustworthy as the US Census, which has no commercial motivations for saying the Internet now plays a large role in citizens' lives?

      And to digress slightly from the topic, I would bet in 1905, far fewer than 7% of people u
      • Oh, and on that same note, I think a follow-up study that correlated internet usage with both age and income level would be far more interesting. The US Census already has that data, after all!
      • by suso (153703) *
        And to digress slightly from the topic, I would bet in 1905, far fewer than 7% of people used cars. Same with your 2005 99% figure. I'd expect it's only about 70%. The same reason for that is the same reason only 40-some percent of Americans use the Internet; they're elderly, or very young, but most of all, many of them are just too poor.

        It will be a great day when I can make a comment on slashdot without one person dissecting information in it.

        Learn to let things go.
        • It will be a great day when I can make a comment on slashdot without one person dissecting information in it.

          Yeah, don't hold your breath- that day is never gonna come. The greater day (and certainly more plausible one) will be the day you accept that people will dissect whatever you post on slashdot. Let things go, indeed.
          • "It will be a great day when I can make a comment on slashdot without one person dissecting information in it."

            It would also be quite an occasion to see someone admit they didn't think something through before posting.
      • Well said, a govt. census is supposed to be about collecting mundane statistics for use in the public domain (eg: how big a shit pipe will we need in 10 years time for suburb X if current trends continue). It has nothing to do with "spectacular revelations".
    • Re:WTF? (Score:1, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Please, let's NOT advocate that government "gather more useful statistics", which necessarily increases the overall cost of government, both in dollars and liberty. The power elite in this country already have many orders of magnitude more power and tax revenue than a fair and ethical government would need to keep the peace.

      Are you aware that the average US citizen pays nearly 50% of his earnings to government through federal, state, and local taxes combined? You already spend half the year working exclusiv
    • Re:WTF? (Score:3, Informative)

      by hackstraw (262471) *
      I thought our government was gathering more useful statistics, but I guess not.

      http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/compu ter.html [census.gov]

      I really like reading the census data. Sometimes the numbers do not at all meet perception, so I try to calibrate my perception from time to time.

      Also, another excellent data site for raw data is http://www.nationmaster.com/ [nationmaster.com] and another is http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/index .html [cia.gov].

      Its like saying that in 1905 only 7% of people used cars and now in 2005 99%
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 28, 2005 @10:00AM (#13896211)
    And she totally disagrees. She's gonna go post about it on her livejournal, then I'll submit it to Slashdot.
  • Comparison (Score:4, Interesting)

    by eobanb (823187) on Friday October 28, 2005 @10:02AM (#13896218) Homepage
    I'd like to see how this compares with other developed countries, especially ones in which broadband penetration is much higher, like in South Korea, Japan, most of Scandinavia, and to a bit less extent, most of Western Europe. If the US has 40%, what nation probably has the highest percentage? Sweden?
    • Easy. Just rate how loud the DB is when jackasses call into the call center screaming bloody murder with rage all pissed off that they cannot get online. Be it PC, or cable modem issue. I mean, you can take someones TV away. But you be DAMNED if they lose internet connection.

      Ya, I say the Internet is very important.
      • I mean, you can take someones TV away. But you be DAMNED if they lose internet connection.

        Here in the UK, the TV is on the list of things that debt collectors cannot collect, alongside fridges, heating etc. I wonder how long it will be before computers are added to that list; especially with the personal data on the drive.

        • I really don't lose internet connections anymore. I remember being the 1st on my street to have MediaOne, the cable guy was happy to see someone interested in broadband in my area. Back in those days I would file a downed-network complain every fucking week, the support people knew me by name. TV connections is always very reliable.

    • As a guess I think you may find that even though they have more penetration there is actually LESS use for the items in this article. Everyone I know in the US who has put up the cash for broadband wants to see a "return" on that "investment". And honestly it does not take long before you can easily justify the 30-50$ a month (I probably save that much JUST from the comparison shopping/rebate searches I can do online).

      None of this may apply when the broadband access is heavily subsidized by the governm
    • Can't remeber the exact numbers off hand but the most penetrated countries are:

      South Korea, Canada, Sweden, Norway & Japan

      (in that order too I think)
    • Re:Comparison (Score:3, Informative)

      by Vicsun (812730)
      I'm not sure what the percentage is in Sweden, but just south in the little province of Denmark, the internet penetration percentage is around 80%.
    • Re:Comparison (Score:3, Informative)

      by hackstraw (262471) *
      Linky:

      http://www.nationmaster.com/cat/Internet [nationmaster.com]

      Click away...
  • internet? (Score:4, Funny)

    by BushCheney08 (917605) on Friday October 28, 2005 @10:02AM (#13896220)
    Can someone tell me where I can get a copy of this internet thing? I don't wanna be left out...
    • Sure. Just bite down on your nearest power cord. You should see it then.
    • ...apparently it comes on computers these days...
    • Can someone tell me where I can get a copy of this internet thing? I don't wanna be left out...

      You work for a computer company? You know...I bet if you could just find some 'product', you could put it up for sale on the internet...then, you'd make some serious money. You could then just sell this product to millions of people around the world, and have very little overhead. You'd probably be able to retire in a couple of years.

      The sad part about that quote above is that, in the year 2002, I had a real

    • Check you mailbox, AOL are sending the Internet out on CD.
  • the figs.... (Score:2, Interesting)

    by shrewd (830067)
    t shows 40 percent of U.S. adults used the Web to obtain news, weather or sports information, a dramatic increase from the 7 percent who surfed in 1997, when the bureau conducted a similar study. The report also found that nearly half of adults, 47 percent, used the Internet to find information on products or services. About one-third reported purchasing a product or service online, compared with only 2 percent who did so in 1997


    when it says a third reported purchasing products or services online compa
    • About one-third reported purchasing a product or service online, compared with only 2 percent who did so in 1997

      More telling would be knowing how many people are getting things for free (to put it gently) online.

      Eric
  • Paper maps (Score:2, Offtopic)

    by $RANDOMLUSER (804576)
    Does anybody make (or buy) maps of small towns anymore?
    • Re:Paper maps (Score:4, Insightful)

      by LordEd (840443) on Friday October 28, 2005 @10:21AM (#13896344)
      Does anybody make (or buy) maps of small towns anymore?

      Yes, paper maps do exist for both large and small cities. In my area, these maps are mostly free because they are supported by advertising local businesses.

      As nice as google maps or other software packages are, its a lot lighter to carry a real map than a laptop, or a lot less expensive than buying a portable GPS map unit.
    • Re:Paper maps (Score:3, Insightful)

      by hal9000(jr) (316943)

      Not of small towns necessarily, but of regions and states, sure. I have been using a Garmin GPSMap 76 [garmin.com] with thier Mapsource software and while it is good for trip planning and the occasional re-routing, it take fore thought to load the maps and really doens't give a good overview of where you are, where you are going, and where you will be.

      Paper maps are exremely useful if your lost and trying to figure out how to get back to where you need to be. Now you can say with a GPS, you never get lost because yo

    • All over, in auto parts stores, and in most gas stations which have a quickie mart setup. I still buy them ocassionally, as sometimes Yahoo Maps, MapQuest, etc sometimes are slightly off the mark.
  • by jpellino (202698) on Friday October 28, 2005 @10:04AM (#13896236)
    I got the pages from the 1930 census - the first one my father was on - there is a category for whether they had a radio in the house or not. He didn't but the Camarco family next door did. Yes, I teased him about it.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    that 80 percent of U.S. adults used the Web to obtain porn.

    As an administrator for a large ISP, I can see who's really downloading the porn.

    The most popular newsgroup? alt.binaries.pictures.erotica.teen.female.

    • The most popular newsgroup? alt.binaries.pictures.erotica.teen.female.

      Possibly, but aren't you confusing 'most popular' with 'generating the most traffic'? I suspect there's plenty newsgroups that are just as popular (or more so), but simply lighter on the data pipes.

      Same with other types of internet usage. Things like e-mail and IM can take a small share of all bandwidth, but still be among the most popular applications.
  • by Big Nothing (229456) <big.nothing@bigger.com> on Friday October 28, 2005 @10:06AM (#13896246)
    The actual report can be found here (PDF warning) [census.gov].

  • Could the same not be said about any emerging technology? I bet it took things like television, cars, and telephones a few years to gain traction in the American household, but thereafter became an integral part of our lifestyle. I don't see why anyone would think the Internet would be any different.
    • by bcattwoo (737354) on Friday October 28, 2005 @10:59AM (#13896565)
      Could the same not be said about any emerging technology? I bet it took things like television, cars, and telephones a few years to gain traction in the American household, but thereafter became an integral part of our lifestyle. I don't see why anyone would think the Internet would be any different.

      Not necessarily. There are plenty of "mature" technologies that are not a part of the average household (own any small planes?). Whether a technology gains widespread adoption depends on the cost and appeal to consumers. The internet could have easily remained just a geeky way of exchanging research information if it had not been adopted for commercial use.

      • The telephone is still used to call emergency help(police, medical, fire). The internet needs to be a device to automatically call help when needed. It will than be looked at as a necessity and will be subsidised so everyone will have it.
  • Tell me more about these mystical creatures who don't spend their time on the internet, and who still play that game called "First Life"... Do they ride unicorns? Do they know Santa Claus?
  • I'm too lazy to find related /. article, it was a few weeks ago, some of you may remember. USA has fallen from 4th (previous year) to 16th (this year) place among countries that have broadband internet.

    So USA is not using internet that much in fact. Another PR stunt just on time when EU wants to takeover.
    • USA has fallen from 4th (previous year) to 16th (this year) place among countries that have broadband internet.

      The US is a large place geographically. There are many, many places that still don't have access to broadband, yet do have phone access. Dial-up is quite alive and kicking in the US.

    • I think it's important to make the distinction between broadband penetration and the actual use of broadband in people's daily lives. As has been pointed out elsewhere in these comments, countries which subsidise high speed connections will have a higher percentage of people with access to the internet, but not necessarily of internet use.
      Rather than a 'PR' stunt this is a different look at internet use. I don't thinki the Census Bureau really has an agenda to promote the US over other nations.
      Anecdot
  • by ScentCone (795499) on Friday October 28, 2005 @10:08AM (#13896259)
    The internet plays a large role in every US citizen's life. Virtually every bank, insurance company, restaurant, factory, school or other organization relies on the the net in one form or another to function productively (or function at all in some cases). Just because not everyone making use of those pieces of our culture and economy directly use the web doesn't mean that they're un-impacted by the internet.

    To the extent that we have all sorts of just-in-time deliveries to factories, package tracking, widely accessible databases, and all sorts of other efficiency-enabling goodies that rely on internetworking, the thrust of the summary sells it very short. Sure, web/e-mail/IM use by individuals is way, way up from 5 or 10 years ago - but the country's use of the internet, down at the economic and government plumbing level, affects everyone, and in ways that most people don't appreciate until it breaks.
    • That's very true about the internet not being limited to what we personally use in our homes, but I think an important thing to note here is that just-in-time is not unique to the internet. It's not even unique to long-distance communications. [rant] People have always wanted to minimize storage time. Then some people started focusing on it and it had a better return than improving in other areas. Then some genius decided that "hey, I've invented a new concept: just-in-time manufacturing and delivery!"
      • Well, your point is correct, and I appreciate your saying that you weren't countering anything I said, but I hope I was clear in implying that things like JIT-manufacturing as we currently enjoy them, and the economic efficiencies they produce, depend utterly on the interconnectivity of large companies. Good old EDI was taking care of that before SOAP and all the new stuff - but without the network, now, we'd be several percentage points more sluggish (probably muce more) in our manufacturing and financial
        • One thing I notice is that the benefit that the internet offers to capitalism, as taught in Econ 101, is often overlooked. One of the ASSumptions when studying pure capitalism is Perfect Information. Basically it means everyone knows everything (yeah, oversimplified but my cytokines are spiking). The internet, and networking/databases/realtime/tech/etc took up a huge step toward that unreachable goal. The 80s and 90s and the tech bubble rode a wave that brought the entire world much closer to one of the
      • I respectfully disagree. JIT by itself it just an optimization, but it is a core a component of lean manufacturing, which was in many respects a novel concept, at least as compared with classic mass manufacturing. I know this viscerally because in my job we try to teach lean concepts to many of our clients, and some Just Don't Get It. It seems so counter-intuitive to them ("Why would I want small batch sizes? That takes more set-up time!")

        Of course, it's a matter of semantics, what is truly "new" vs. wh
  • Money! (Score:3, Insightful)

    by garcia (6573) on Friday October 28, 2005 @10:08AM (#13896263)
    In 2004, 39.5 million U.S. households shopped online, Forrester said, 3.5 million more than in 2003. The company predicts broadband, laptop and home networking adoption will help drive online research and purchasing to more than 55 million households by 2010.

    Well, it depends on how much the bandwidth charges cost. In their equation, bandwidth is the only thing that isn't going down in price. Home networking gear, laptops, mobile devices with wireless/GPRS, etc, are all falling rapidly. It's the network connection fees that are prohibitive.

    They are claiming that a huge percentage of households will have broadband available to them by 2010 but how many will be able to afford it with restrictions such as required CATV, local phone service, etc? Yeah, the actual Internet connection seems inexpensive until you realize that you have to bundle it w/the other services to get a reasonable rate.

    That's what needs to be ended before broadband adoption skyrockets.
  • Pffft! Porn? (Score:1, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward
    I've banged escorts I found on the web.

    You think I'm kidding, but I'm not.

    Now if only our Victorian era legal system could be dragged into the 21st century...

  • and what about the people who can't afford internet access? Should we just forget about them? They don't count? This article should be a clarion call that we need to be doing more to help minorities break the digital divide so they can get good jobs.
    • and what about the people who can't afford internet access? Should we just forget about them? They don't count?
      Where does this suggestion come from?
    • Re:Right... (Score:4, Interesting)

      by ScentCone (795499) on Friday October 28, 2005 @10:26AM (#13896382)
      and what about the people who can't afford internet access? Should we just forget about them?

      Go. To. The. Library.

      Or, are you suggesting that poor families that live too far from a library instead be provided with dial-up ISP accounts, a telephone line if they don't have one, a computer they clearly don't know how to use, and ongoing tech support such as will clearly be needed when someone who has never used these things is suddenly depending on them to "get a good job."

      Or... perhaps those parents should be encouraging their kids to pay attention in school? There are countless ways for schools to get hold of free computer hardware and net access, but most don't have the staff needed to supervise/train students in the continual use thereof. If you're posting this comment, right now, about how I should be listening to the "clarion call" that you're mentioning... first tell me how many schools you've visited with that rebuilt Ubunto P3-450 and a $9 donation to cover that month's dial-up access for the machine?

      And... minorities? Do you really think that lack of experience online, and lack of personally owned net-connected workstations is limited somehow to people of one color or another? Are you that race-fixated? Ever driven through Appalachia? Wake up, man, and talk some less myopic, skin-color-driven smack so that you can be taken seriously. And explain what you've done before telling me what I should do.
      • Re:Right... (Score:1, Interesting)

        by LeonGeeste (917243) *
        The library? Right. Conservatives have cut library funding for decades. Most of the libraries near where poor people live don't have internet access because they can't afford it. So they have to go to faraway libraries (whilst paying bus fair!) and then pay out-of-zone fees for a library card that you have to get to be allowed to use their internet there. Plus, all of the libraries I know require you to show photo ID to get on, which a lot of people don't want to reveal because they may have a criminal
        • on richer neighborhoods like San Fran

          you haven't a clue what you're talking about. if you think a city of 1.x million, which happens to be at the center of a metro area with a population of ~10 million can be considered a "richer neighborhood" then my only polite response is that you are just making this shit up to try to impress people

          last week in san francisco (that "rich neighborhood") a schizophrenic 23 year old mother of 3 threw her babbies into the bay because the voices told her to feed them to th

          • you haven't a clue what you're talking about. if you think a city of 1.x million, which happens to be at the center of a metro area with a population of ~10 million can be considered a "richer neighborhood" then my only polite response is that you are just making this shit up to try to impress people

            In comparison to much of the rest of the country, it is a "rich neighborhood". If you can't figure that out by the obvious real estate prices, then please search wikipedia for per capita and household inco

            • Look, there are poor people in every major city across the country, because metro areas tend have the most resources to help poor people. But, compare SF with other metro areas, and yeah, it's a pretty rich county.

              while you're right, i don't think its an entirely fair approach. if we distributed support based on mean income, or on mean real estate prices, then a lot of very needy people are getting screwed. while the bay area does have some of the highest real estate, it also has a much more pronounced we

        • Re:Right... (Score:3, Insightful)

          by ScentCone (795499)
          Conservatives have cut library funding for decades

          Except that most libraries are, and should be, extensions of the local educational framework. Those are administered, and typically funded by local taxes (usually property taxes) overseen by state legislatures and county councils. The most impoverished, under-educated, high-unemployment areas of the country aren't run by conservatives, they're run - at the city, county, and state levels - by liberals. You'd think that areas (take, say, New Orleans as an e
          • >> Yeah, see, most people of color tend to prefer to spend that on, I don't know, diapers and baby formula.

            Also, as someone planning on having a child and doing the research, i'm compelled to point out that for most people, diapers are the only necessary portion of that spending (and reusable ones are cheaper). Most women who become mothers have a natural limited supply of baby food that's FREE, and don't need to buy formula. In actuality formula is less healthy than breast milk anyway.

            Also, so
    • wasn't that what NetZero was all about? but that didn't go too far.....

      Ira
    • One thing to consider is that the Internet is becoming so much a part of life, not only with the minor stuff like website URLs for movies, but being able to apply for benefits from natural disasters like Katrina. As soon as the government makes it so that you have to use the Internet for getting benefits, it is now (here comes the fun part) up to the government to make sure that everyone has access.

      Now whether that means that it will fall on the libraries to have public terminals (and if so, they need to

    • and what about the people who can't afford internet access? Should we just forget about them? They don't count? This article should be a clarion call that we need to be doing more to help minorities break the digital divide so they can get good jobs.

      You DO understand irony!
  • And a lot of people are using the Internet? Woah, what was that? I think I just saw Captain Obvious fly by!
  • Seriously, the Internet makes it almost too easy to access information. If I want pizza, I go online and order it. If I want a movie, I go online and order it. To submit homework, I go online to submit it. To get a job, I email applications and lookup company profiles on the internet. I guess the Internet is the new opiate for the masses.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 28, 2005 @10:30AM (#13896402)
      I guess the Internet is the new opiate for the masses.

      I love it when people toss about references with no understanding of their origin or meaning. When Marx initially wrote about religion being the opiate, he was actually paying it a (albeit backhanded) compliment, that awareness of a religious idea can steer people toward a more noble life. It makes the oppressed fell better about their condition.

      Marx figured religion would become obsolete anyway after the Revolution[tm].

      Now even if we take the fully negative context that has been imposed on the quote over the years, your previous statement does not add up:

      Seriously, the Internet makes it almost too easy to access information. If I want pizza, I go online and order it. If I want a movie, I go online and order it. To submit homework, I go online to submit it. To get a job, I email applications and lookup company profiles on the internet.

      And where's the downside you are seeing? The Marx quote is sometimes applied to television and other mediums that tend to make people passive and distracted. What you describe is a handy and practical tool, and somehow this offends you.

      So what's really interesting here is that the Marx quote, in its original context, might actually apply to some extent to the Internet, but not for the reasons you think.

      • When Marx initially wrote about religion being the opiate, he was actually paying it a (albeit backhanded) compliment, that awareness of a religious idea can steer people toward a more noble life. It makes the oppressed fell better about their condition.

        Yes. Here's the real full quote, from Wikipedia [wikipedia.org]:

        "Religion is the sign of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people."

        Religion is the "heart of a heartless world?" The "sou

    • Your post seems to boil down to this: "I do a convenient thing with the internet. I do another convenient thing with the internet. I do yet another convenient thing with the internet. Therefore, it makes people stupid." I don't get it.

      Please elaborate a bit. How does having to walk across campus in the freezing rain to turn in homework make one smarter, or at least maintains your current level of intelligence? How does calling a pizza place and ordering pizza for delivery do the same thing?
      • I guess I really should put more thought into my posts...

        What I mean is, the internet makes it too easy to do certain things. It makes it almost too easy to do research, shopping, and even education. I guess my title wasn't quite appropriate, but I figure somebody might appreciate the "Something Awful reference." In a way, I wanted to almost tie this post to the IDE (rottign the brain) article the other day. The internet allows you to do things very quickly, not necessarily smartly. Don't get me wron

    • Seriously, the Internet makes it almost too easy to access information. If I want pizza, I go online and order it. If I want a movie, I go online and order it. To submit homework, I go online to submit it. To get a job, I email applications and lookup company profiles on the internet. I guess the Internet is the new opiate for the masses.

      Seriously, shops make it almost too easy to get products. If I want pizza, I go to the pizza shop and buy it. If I want a movie, I go to a shop and buy it on DVD. I guess s

  • by vivekg (795441) on Friday October 28, 2005 @10:15AM (#13896305) Homepage Journal
    The average person spends about nine hours a day using some type of media, which is arguably in excess of anything we would have envisioned 10 years ago. It includes television, books, magazines, cell phones, the Internet, instant messaging, e-mail and radio ... full report is here [bsu.edu]
  • "Alaska ranked the highest, with nearly 70 percent having access to the Web."

    .... must be all that eskimo pr0n!

    • That's fairly easy to explain.

      For most people, the Web is the best, and in many cases, the ONLY connection to the rest of the country/world.

      In a state where many locations aren't even connected with roads, an information media like the Internet is invaluable.
  • Air has been found to be important.

    Seriously, slow Friday?

  • And yet we're still way behind in adopting broadband compared to other countries.
    • Yeah, we're behind some other countries in broadband adoption. Oh look...we're way ahead of some other countries.

      Broadband is not the only way to access the Internet.

  • by robca2 (843072)
    WTF is the internet?
  • Forrester Research, for example, predicted in August that broadband Internet access alone will more than double this decade, reaching 71 million U.S. households in 2010.

    This seems pretty conservative. With technologies like Wi-Max and Wi-Fi, and google rolling this out for free, I would imagine that almost everyone would have broadband access by 2010.
  • by certel (849946)
    Could anyone imagine not using the internet? It has been a way of life. Although it has been very beneficial, I think it has increased the speed in our lifestyles because information is so readily available.
  • Increasing importance of the internet to the average person is, in many respects, a good thing. It means a growing market, which attracts money, which drives innovation forward and prices downward (yes, you can argue that broadband is overpriced, but consider what you bay per Mbit down today as compared to what you would have paid per Mbit down 10 years ago). This is true for anything, of course, but it's more true for the internet: many of the advantages that can be provided by connectivity become more eff
  • Maybe it's just me, but 40% don't make it an "integral part" of the "American lifestyle" IMO. Outside of the fact that "America" is a bit bigger than you might think, anyway (what you probably mean is "US-American lifestyle"), 40%, well, just isn't that much, even if it's considerably more than in 1997. Once you go beyond 90%, we can start to talk about whether it's an "integral part".
  • NOW we are in a "dot-boom". But we can't get much development capital, because of the "dot-bust". Triggered in part by that 2% figure.

    Bizzare. The hype was accurate (30% of people will now buy stuff on the Internet), riches are to be made, but you can't do it anymore.

    Ratboy.
  • The job of the Census is to count the people, nothing more, nothing less. This lame ass "survey" crap has got to stop.
  • WITH factiods to help them on their way!

    Automobiles Play Large Role in American Life - The planning and layout of American cities has caused the AUTOMOBILE (sometimes also konwn as a "car") to pllay a large role in American life. Rich people drive better cars than poor people, and are less likely to take the bus from the suburbs to their jobs.

    People are Getting Older - Studies are comfirming that from the moment Americans are born, they continue to age without any slowing of getting older as time passes. ma

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