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The Internet

Internet Turns 35 Today 244

Posted by michael
from the all-downhill-from-here dept.
shadowspar writes "The CBC is reporting that the Internet turned 35 today. The story talks about the less-than-prophetic beginnings of the net: 'In order to log in to the two-computer network, which was then called ARPANET, programmers at UCLA were to type in 'log', and Stanford would reply 'in'. The UCLA programmers only got as far as 'lo' before the Stanford machine crashed.'"
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Internet Turns 35 Today

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  • Man (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:11PM (#10668081)
    I'd swear it only looked 29!
    • Re:Man (Score:2, Informative)

      by Flashbck (739237)
      Considering this monumentous occasion. I suggest everyone head on over to ebaumsworld and check out the 70's/80's video [ebaumsworld.com] about "Internet" and how great it is!
  • Which? (Score:5, Funny)

    by datGSguy (820433) <telnix@gmail.com> on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:12PM (#10668085) Homepage
    Which Internet?
  • 21 (Score:5, Funny)

    by happyfrogcow (708359) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:12PM (#10668087)
    I think that means Al Gore was only 21 when he invented it
    • Re:21 (Score:4, Informative)

      by Alric (58756) <slashdot@tenhundfeld. o r g> on Saturday October 30, 2004 @11:07AM (#10672303) Homepage Journal
      I know you're joking, and I do appreciate the humor of Gore's choice of words.

      However, it should be noted that Gore's words in a CNN interview, as quoted by Wired News, were as
      follows:
      "During my service in the United States Congress, I took the
      initiative in creating the Internet."

      Gore's meaning was fairly obvious: that he was one of the critical political supporters of the Internet. This is absolutely true. Without his support in the Congress, the Internet would have matured less quickly.

      He never claimed to have "invented" anything. His efforts did help "create" the Internet though. And it is an accomplishment to be lauded...not mocked.

      I wish people would stop misrepresenting this fact.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:12PM (#10668092)
    MS must have a time machine.
    • Apparently BSD has been dying for much longer than people realize.

      Since I've been using FreeBSD, NeXT, and MacOS X, exclusively for the past 15 years this news gives me pause for thought. Each OS has been reliable, fast, low-maintenance and enjoyable. Because of this I was not terribly concerned by the sad news that BSD was dying. Honestly, it always seemed pretty healthy to me.

      Hearing that this fatal condition has persisted for much longer than I had known about, perhaps I should finally heed the warni
  • 35 years (Score:5, Funny)

    by thedogcow (694111) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:13PM (#10668096)
    and what a wonderful 35 years of porn collecting it was.
    • Re:35 years (Score:5, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:26PM (#10668234)
      ...especially considering that the for the first 20 years the porn was entirely text-based.
    • by Anonymous Coward
      reminded me of this little gem:
      "The Internet was invented by the American military back in the late '60s. It was designed to be a durable, scalable, decentralized information delivery system so that in the event of a nuclear attack, American military leaders would still have access to pornography."

      Three Dead Trolls in a Baggie [deadtroll.com] - "Keep your parents off the internet" (I'm not afiliated with them)
  • by Sneftel (15416) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:13PM (#10668098)
    From the article:
    Kleinrock said he predicted in 1969 that the small network would eventually expand across the globe, making a vast amount of information accessible at any time from anywhere in the world.


    "The part I missed... was that my 97-year-old mother would be on the internet today," he said.

    "...and man, do I ever wish those pictures hadn't gotten onto the 'net."
    • Kleinrock said he predicted in 1969 that the small network would eventually expand across the globe, making a vast amount of information accessible at any time from anywhere in the world.
      The prediction was so close!

      Modified for correctness:

      Kleinrock said he predicted in 1969 that the small network would eventually expand across the globe, making a vast amount of junk email accessible at any time from anywhere in the world.
    • by pchan- (118053) on Friday October 29, 2004 @07:32PM (#10668761) Journal
      those of you that are at UCLA can go to the engineering library (Boelter Hall, 4th? floor) and see the IMP (interface message processor). it's a green refrigerator-sized metal box with some switches on the front. it was the first node (along with the stanford machine) on what is now the internet.
      • those of you that are at UCLA can go to the engineering library (Boelter Hall, 4th? floor) and see the IMP (interface message processor). it's a green refrigerator-sized metal box with some switches on the front.

        UCLAd00d1: Dude, there's this funky green fridge thing on the 4th floor, but there's no beer inside, man!
        UCLAd00d2: No way, mon. Let me grab my uber-1337 peltier and water c00ling system and fix it up, d00d.
        UCLAd00d1: sw33t!!!

        Soko
  • 35 years on (Score:5, Funny)

    by BillsPetMonkey (654200) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:13PM (#10668101)
    and you can go and meet many of the original programmers, now working in home improvement stores up and down the land!
    • ... many of the original programmers [of the internet], now working in home improvement stores up and down the land!

      That should encourage us all: even after 35 years of internet-enabled outsourcing, really great programmers with a portfolio of original, ground-breaking work can still find a job without moving to Asia.

  • by Alien54 (180860) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:14PM (#10668109) Journal
    all alike.

    or like galaxies in the night sky, separated by vast expanses of emptines and porn

  • I am logged in for 8 years now, and wished those 8 years where earlier in time.
    more people != more fun on here.
  • by ajlitt (19055) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:15PM (#10668119)
    ...wasn't "log". It was "lol!!1! did u get my msg??"
  • 35? (Score:5, Funny)

    by daeley (126313) * on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:15PM (#10668127) Homepage
    Damn, that's old. I think it's about time for the Internet to packet in.

    Ahem.
    • Re:35? (Score:2, Funny)

      by ar1550 (544991)
      No, no, 35 is the perfect age. It's not so old that it can't attract younger users, but it has enough experience to satisfy even the most advance user.
  • by Suburbanpride (755823) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:17PM (#10668153)
    I remember on the old PBS Triumph of the Nerds documentry, they said that internet years are like dogs years, since everything changes so fast. I've been online since 1994 (mosiac and trumpet winsock), and the internet of today is very different from 10 years ago, although it still used HTTP.

    I'm not even sure its safe to called the ARPANET the internet, considering how limited it was, but it will make for some interesting debate.

    • by pixel.jonah (182967) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:21PM (#10668178)
      PLEASE Remember:

      Internet > WWW

      Thank you.

      • Road network > Cars or Postal system > Junk Mail.

        The internet is a number of inventions put together, the idea of a open protocol that any computer network could talk to the outside regardless of what it used internally. It is also the idea that it not centralized like more tradionional networks so that it could survive outage.

        Just like junkmail != Postal system, the internet != WWW. Rather just like junkmail uses the postal system to work, the WWW uses the internet. HOWEVER, the two are entirely un

      • The Internet was "born" for the public, when it came available for the public. That happens pretty much to collide with the rise of http.

        The previous existance, of some wack hackers, playing with protocols, some of them still very usefull, and smart militairy playing with communications doesnt mean its the "net".

        At least, I think thats the semantic meaning of your parent's "real"

        "/Dread"
    • Sure it was (Score:5, Insightful)

      by abb3w (696381) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:37PM (#10668334) Journal
      I'm not even sure its safe to called the ARPANET the internet, considering how limited it was

      FTP is quite old [faqs.org], and was quite useful even before gopher and later http made zipping files back and forth trivial. The genius of Berners-Lee was rather like the mythical invention of the Recees Peanut Butter Cup. He figured out a way to combine a hypertext markup scheme [wikipedia.org] with internet file transfer. The individual component ideas had been lying around for at least seven years (and possibly since the dawn of ARPANET) when he put them together in a limited whole. Active scripting was a bit more clever an idea, but only marginally.

      I will grant that it's a good thing TELNET is dying in favor of SSH-- security (network and computer alike) has made great progress since then. So has bandwidth. So has accessibility to the general public [catb.org]. But it's no more funamentally different in terms of power than modern desktop computers are compared to those of days of yore [computerhistory.org].

      • You're putting TELNET down if you think its importance was limited by security and bandwidth. TELNET was the original killer app of networking: its development led the original thinking about how much a network application should do vs. what the underlying network should do. It exposed many portability issues across different architectures and operating system environments. FTP has direct debts to TELNET, the whole concept of open protocols does. That paradigm has made the Internet the success it is. TELNE

    • I still get .arpa hits on my website, JSA.

      Besides, the place to be in 94 was newsgroups and (text-only) muds, the web was a small place back then (in comparison). Gopher, man... ahhh, gopher. Where are my old friends Archie and Veronica? I want to ask Eric about something...

  • It is not like the original ubergeeks sat around the U Berkeley lab setting up DARPANet in the 1960s and said "Hey! Let's invent an infinitely superior music distribution model that no one can make money off of!"

    But that is exactly what they did.
    • I would have modded you troll, if I had mod points.
      • Don't you have to go to iTunes, in order for them to make money off you? Speak for yourself, I've never been there.
      • Everyone seems to claim that they are not. Apple says it is breaking even and the money is on the iPods and the music screwers claim that the prices have to go up because they ain't making enough profit on it (lets see 99 per song, 15 songs per album, exactly what is the price of an american CD? and how can something wich doesn't cost money to produce but raises the same kind of money as something wich costs a lot to produce or so they claim have less profit? ARRGH MY HEAD TRYING TO UNDERSTAND RIAA DOUBLESP
    • If it were, it would have read something like this...

      it is not like the original ubergeeks sat around the u berkeley lab setting up darpanet in the 1960s

      and said hey lets invent an infinitely superior music distribution model that no one can make money off of

      but that is exactly what the did

      Of course, it would then ramble on for at least 10 more micro-paragraphs, none of which would use punctuation or capitalization.
    • by soliptic (665417) on Friday October 29, 2004 @07:48PM (#10668866) Journal
      First, let me say I agree with your key point (unintended consequences) absolutely. It's one of the things that fascinates me most about the internet. What strikes me very clearly is how undeniably Marxist the whole thing is. Now, I know most people tend towards ill-informed knee-jerks at the mention of Marx, but try and forget all that silly Soviet nonsense, which really had precious little to do with Marx at all, and essentially nothing to do with the Marx I'm talking about.

      In short (because I should be in bed already):

      Changes in the means of production (ie. technological advances, eg. the internet) will alter the relations of production and eventually have a "cascade effect" which radically alters society itself (eg. notions of intellectual property).

      But, that's not really what I wanted to pick up. Rather, I'm curious as to how a music distribution that "no one" can make money off can possibly be considered "infinitely superior".

      I'm not trying to troll, I dont think P2P is theft, blah blah. Hell, I use P2P myself - yes, to download music. Yes, to download music which I'm not supposed to.

      On the other hand, as a musician, there has to be money in there somewhere, or the consequences are potentially dire. Now you can say "real musicians will continue to make music for the love of it, even if they're not getting paid" all you like. You'd be right. They will.

      But.... lets just say, I spent five years making music while a student/unemployed. In that time I consistently averaged one track every two weeks. Eleven months ago I got a full-time temping job; since then I've made five tracks in total. Three months ago I got a full-time "proper" job; since then I've made absolutely nothing.

      It's simply a matter of time and energy. If you can earn money from your music, you can devote all your time to it. If you can't, you're faced with trying to come up with some meaningful in two or three snatched hours after work, with a head full of stress and that 7am alarm clock lurking at the back of your mind.

      If nobody makes money from music, less music gets made. Sad but true.

      • my comment was basically paraphrasing from a story i wrote a long time ago on kuro5hin

        http://www.kuro5hin.org/story/2003/1/28/31758/740 2 [kuro5hin.org]

        basically, my point is that the desire to create music is stronger than the desire to make money

        we were banging on drums on front of campfires simply for the sheer joy of it tens of thousands of years before we were exchanging metal coins

        do you love music?

        no, really... do you love music?: because if you really do, then you will understand why making money or not of
  • How did the internet grow in the early days? A bar chart of connectivity by year would be interesting.
  • Weird..... (Score:2, Funny)

    by dickeya (733264)
    my girlfriend just turned 35 also. Hmmmmmm, I've never seen them in a picture together.................
  • I suppose it's fitting that there's at least one blogging who's blogging the event here [seanbonner.com].
  • So... (Score:5, Funny)

    by Ryan Stortz (598060) <ryan0rz&gmail,com> on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:23PM (#10668200)
    So....does this mean that after they tried again, the first 3 letters the grace the internet were lol.

    (Lo [crash] Log)

    It's a scary thought....
    • Re:So... (Score:3, Funny)

      by Frogbert (589961)
      Even worse they mistyped the second attempt.

      Lo (Crash) Lomg

    • So was the first ever bit to travel over the Net a 0 or a 1??

      Assuming that the Honeywell-based IMP was a using a 7-bit ASCII-like encoding without checksum bit and transferred bit sequentially from most to least significant bit, then the first sequence was 1001100. But I guess it was perhaps rather based on a five-bit teletype scheme.

      There wasn't much info on the DDP-516's homepage about that. But I like this quote: "The Honeywell DDP-516 was chosen for its high clock speed (aprox. 1.1 MHz) and expanda

  • by Ars-Fartsica (166957) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:23PM (#10668203)
    In a 4th year networking class paper:

    "The Web will likely be a novelty while serious research will remain on Gopher."


    • I didn't see this on Compuserve in 1993, so it is false. Faker! :}
    • by RealProgrammer (723725) on Friday October 29, 2004 @07:59PM (#10668928) Homepage Journal
      In 1989 the Internet (all text : mail, telnet, ftp, news, etc) was growing at something like 8% per month. A coworker predicted that in 10 years everyone's toaster would be networked.

      I said, "No, only geeks will ever use the Internet."

      I realized how wrong that was when I saw my first URL on a billboard in about '95. I felt violated. They were taking over my network!
    • Heh. I made a bold prediction around then (probably in 1995): "Rampant piracy will make it very difficult to make money on pr0n, and since 1) nobody does pr0n for free 2) there is a stigma around pr0n that will make law enforcement down-prioritize both breakins and copyright violation, and 3) the Web will effectively replace paper for most types of communication, it will break the pr0n industry's back, and leave behind only artistic expressions of nudity".

      I guess I was wrong... :-)

      But I have been pretty

  • AOL (Score:4, Insightful)

    by frankmu (68782) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:24PM (#10668208) Homepage
    I thought AOL (internet) was alot younger than that.

    it's amazing that their current ad campaign makes AOL=Internet

  • So Al Gore (Score:3, Funny)

    by kensai (139597) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:25PM (#10668215) Homepage
    was only like 10 when he invented the Internet. The man's a freakin genius ;)
    • by Dimensio (311070)
      Al Gore is 56, which means that he would have been 21 at the time of the 'net's first incarnation, not 10.

      Thanks to his invention, I was able to look that up to correct you.
      • Al Gore is 56, which means that he would have been 21 at the time of the 'net's first incarnation, not 10.

        I grit my teeth when I here the "I invented the Internet" jokes. Mainly because he wasn't lying when he sait that. (sort of)

        Just like when GW says "nukular" or "My wife speaks much better English than me", Al made a booboo. A mistake, as it were.

        See, he dinn't invent the internet, he is in large part responsible for its creation.

        See, Al Gore saw someithin in this "Internet" and worked with a nu
  • by Satertek (708058)
    H4PPY B1R7HD4Y 1N73RN37

    thanks alot for l33t speak...
  • 1968 (Score:5, Informative)

    by Trurl's Machine (651488) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:27PM (#10668244) Journal
    1968 was an important year in world history, no doubt about it. In 1998, there was a wave of documentaries, books and essays about that year. The authors focused on yippies [colorado.edu] trashing democratic convention in Chicago, Warsaw Pact invading Czechoslovakia [globalsecurity.org], student uprising in Paris [utoronto.ca], Mexico massacre [worldpress.org], flower-power, maoism, Vietnam war, Beatles recording white album or Che Guevara in Bolivia.

    Almost nobody noticed that 1968 was also the year when Noyce an Moore founded Intel [computerhope.com], Douglas Engelbart demoed [stanford.edu] for the fist time GUI, mouse and word processing, UCLA and Stanford started to build their networking connection. Even today, scholars seem not to notice the relevance of these facts.
    • Re:1968 (Score:4, Interesting)

      by frank_adrian314159 (469671) on Friday October 29, 2004 @07:43PM (#10668832) Homepage
      Even today, scholars seem not to notice the relevance of these facts.

      Because today, the 60's culture of experimentation (in expansion of rights, in lifestyles, and, yes, in chemical ingestion) is decried as nothing but selfish hedonism without actually examining that it might have also been the roots of a culture that allowed technical advances to expand and flourish. Of course, in this dangerous world, we could never let anything like that happen again!

      • Re:1968 (Score:3, Interesting)

        by DerekLyons (302214)

        Because today, the 60's culture of experimentation (in expansion of rights, in lifestyles, and, yes, in chemical ingestion) is decried as nothing but selfish hedonism without actually examining that it might have also been the roots of a culture that allowed technical advances to expand and flourish.

        No need to examine it beyond the most cursory. One finds the hotbeds of psychedelic activity and the hotbeds of technical activity and finds them rather well seperated in space, and slightly seperated in time

        • by Piquan (49943)

          One finds the hotbeds of psychedelic activity and the hotbeds of technical activity and finds them rather well seperated in space, and slightly seperated in time.

          Yeah, because those mind-freaked hippies at Berkeley never did nuthin'.

  • by Lisandro (799651) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:29PM (#10668264)
    ...and thanks for all the porn! (drops a tear)
  • the less-than-prophetic beginnings of the net: ... The UCLA programmers only got as far as 'lo' before the Stanford machine crashed.
    Oh, no. The idea of a machine crashing instead of serving up the requested data is totally alien to the modern Slashdot reader!
  • by pipingguy (566974) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:37PM (#10668340) Homepage

    Dammit, I'm older than it is. Mumble ..kids...MP3...cell phones...aaargh!
  • by The-Bus (138060) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:41PM (#10668374)
    No wonder. I was heading to lunch today and I drove past Matt Sauper's Chevrolet, and there was the Internet with that new blonde girlfriend of it. I hear she's only in college. As I was parking at the sandwich place, there they went, speeding by me. The Internet apparently bought a solid gold Corvette convertible. At least I thought it was him: the license plate said HTTPIMP.
  • Didn't the internet turn 35 a few months ago? [slashdot.org]
  • Katie Hafner wrote a great book entitled "Where Wizards Stay Up Late" thats all about the creation of the arpanet. It is more focused on the work that was going on in Boston and I believe MIT at the time than the specific stanford happenings but has a ton of information on both. This is a very interesting read. http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0684 832674/qid=1099089921/sr=8-1/ref=pd_csp_1/102-7568 317-3623330?v=glance&s=books&n=507846
  • by JessLeah (625838) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:53PM (#10668475)
    Joe Beer thinks "the Internet" is around ten years old, since that's when he first heard of it. Smarter Joe-Beers would point to the date of the invention of the Web (not "the Internet" as a whole) and say "See? The Internet was invented by Tim Berners-Lee in 199x... I read it on such-and-such"...

    [cue OT rant]

    Most bozos nowadays can't distinguish between:

    * "The Internet" and "The Web"
    * "PC" and "Windows"
    * "Microsoft" and "Windows"
    * "Macintosh" and "the Mac OS" (or "Mac OS X")
    * "Apple" and "Macintosh"


    Thus, you will hear things like "Yeah, I'm on the Web" (translation: "I have a connection to the Internet"), or "Are you running Windows or Mac?" (translation: "Windows or Mac OS X"), or "This game is only available for the PC" (read: "...for Windows").

    However, these same functional computer illiterates (read: 99% of the US population) manage to think that "Linux", "Unix", "Red Hat" and "Solaris" (to give four examples) are completely different skillsets (talk to any typical "tech recruiter" and you'll see what I mean. I've met guys who have twenty years of experience in half a dozen commercial Unices, but can't get a job dealing with the one major flavor they've never touched... 'cuz as we all know, they don't all share 99% of the same stuff.... Oh, wait, they do...)
    • Heck, I was just told by our office manager that "Some people's internets are down." Careful probing revealed that, to her, internet==networkDrop. Who knew?
    • However, these same functional computer illiterates (read: 99% of the US population) manage to think that "Linux", "Unix", "Red Hat" and "Solaris" (to give four examples) are completely different skillsets

      Oh, it's much worse than you think...

      "What's a mozilla? I don't want mozilla, I want the internet" -- My Mother.
    • Most bozos nowadays can't distinguish between:

      * "The Internet" and "The Web"
      * "PC" and "Windows"
      * "Microsoft" and "Windows"
      * "Macintosh" and "the Mac OS" (or "Mac OS X")
      * "Apple" and "Macintosh"

      Not to mention IBM compatible PCs running Windows, IBM compatible PCs regardless of what they're running, or PCs in general, or for that matter the roman numeral for ten or the letter X (let alone how to pronounce TeX).

    • by gr0k (113968)
      * "The Internet" and "The Web"

      I found it kinda funny that on your website in your sig about UnixKit contains the following:

      • Built from Unix programs already ported to Windows by coders around the Web

  • by mbrewthx (693182) on Friday October 29, 2004 @06:54PM (#10668480)
    Only yesterday The Internet hosted it's firt pRon site...
  • So does this mean that the whole damn Internet will be down now -- as it gets slashdoted?
  • UCLA: bud
    Stanford: weis
    Slashdot: e...NO CARRIER
  • by TiggertheMad (556308) on Friday October 29, 2004 @07:41PM (#10668818) Homepage Journal
    A president of the United States must be 35 years old and a native US citicizen. So, who is with me?

    INTERNET for PRESIDENT, 2004!

    It is a pretty good choice. Internet is socially liberal, and fiscially conservative, very accepting of others, and it is willing to let you look at it's massive pr0n collection for free.

    Now, all it needs is a phone switch for VP, and it's the ultimate ticket.
  • by Tom7 (102298)
    No no no, it's supposed to go

    LI

    and then crash. LO comes second.
  • WRONG! (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Madwand (79821)
    The Internet turned 21 on January 1, 2004. The Internet was born on January 1, 1983 when the ARPANET converted from NCP to TCP/IP. The ARPANET was Network 10. The ARPANET is dead. Long live the ARPANET!
  • Since I turn 33 today, and until now I never knew I shared a birthday with something so big! It's the geek equivalent to being born on christmas day.

    Guess I'm not an old fart, I'm in fact younger than the internet!
  • Those who have seen the Anime series "Serial Experiments: Lain" will know what I am talking about. Those who haven't, should.
  • by Ctrl-Z (28806)
    Funny, if it was a Linux system it would have crashed at LI.
  • it'd be 'YO!/SUP?' instead" - Thinkgeek

    Seems fitting, though.

    192.168.1.2: 'Lo.
    192.168.1.1: Hey.
    192.168.1.2: 'n I get a shell?
    192.168.1.1: Sure.
  • I don't remember where I had heard that the Internet was born on 9/1/1969, now I find it was 10/29? what's up?
    Why do I care? Because I was born on precisely that date, and it's always been cool to say that the Internet is exactly as old as I am.
  • Darpanet, HEARD OF IT?

    Funded by the government. Precursor of the internet.

    Government handout.

    IS THAT A HAMMER AND SICKLE ON YOUR FOREHEAD?

    DONT LIKE IT? LOG OFF.

    Use a commercial network like X.25. Apply to Tymnet, Inc. and hope they'll accept your website.

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