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Hobbit Hole + World Class Fallout Shelter 179

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the hang-your-hat-under-ground dept.
ChaosMt writes "Slashdot has covered buying missile silos before, along with buying old microwave bunkers to provide the ultimate level of data protection. Making your own Hobbit hole has been covered too. Now you can have it all in the best shelter I've ever seen (even beating the Subterranean Fortress) in an undisclosed location outside of Durango, Colorado. It may not be your cup of tea, but it is very impressive to see and compare to your own disaster planning."
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Hobbit Hole + World Class Fallout Shelter

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  • by mmarlett (520340) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:17PM (#10228006)
    ... it doesn't handle Slashdotting.
  • Paranoia (Score:5, Insightful)

    by CaptainBaz (621098) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:19PM (#10228015) Homepage Journal
    Wow, these guys really are preying on your fears, aren't they? Remember all the nutjobs who ran for the hills in the middle of all the Y2K panic? That was funny enough, but pushing this kind of place, on the vague premise that 'there hasn't been a virulent epidemic for a while now', is just silly...
    • Re:Paranoia (Score:3, Informative)

      by toetagger1 (795806)

      I just RTFA, and I agree:

      "The truth is, there is a smorgasbord of infectious agents and diseases out there waiting to be released, contracted, and spread - plague, tularemia, SARS, Ebola, Marburg, West Nile virus, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, to name just a few.

      Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is suspected to be passed to humans from cattle and other animals that have Mad Cow Disease. As far as I know, they aren't even sure yet if that is true. Nor is there proof that the diesaes spreads between humans.

      • Re:Paranoia (Score:3, Funny)

        by someme2 (670523)

        Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is suspected to be passed to humans from cattle and other animals that have Mad Cow Disease. [...] Nor is there proof that the diesaes spreads between humans.

        Very true! I think we can dare to go a step further and say: Nor is there proof that spread of a disease that you get from eating cows can be prevented by hiding in an underground bunker complex.

        Also, my favorite part is the end of the article:

        Because of the owner's illness and major surgery, the house is currently bein

      • Re:Paranoia (Score:3, Informative)

        by TheMeuge (645043)
        Actually there is proof. A little while ago, I microepidemic of the Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease broke out when surgeons at a hospital (kill me, but I do not remember where exactly) operated on a person who had advanced neurological problems. They found damaged brain tissue, but the diagnosis was never made. Several years afterwards, patients with CJD started coming in. The final conslusion was that it was transmitted by the medical team who were re-using some of the equipment. The medical equipment was steril
    • but pushing this kind of place, on the vague premise that 'there hasn't been a virulent epidemic for a while now', is just silly...

      I dunno, i'm not afraid of any of that stuff, but this still seems rather appealing. The level to which he has chosen to "get away from it all" is perhaps a little extreme for my tastes, but it definately has its good points.
    • Re:Paranoia (Score:5, Interesting)

      by BoldAC (735721) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:30PM (#10228081)
      On a related subject and much more practical...

      Did you know you can get a stormproof room in your house?

      We were recently building a new house and our contractor said for $3k he could make a "safe room" for us.

      I let him do it...

      So when the next hurricane/tornado comes, the only things left in the house will be my family and my servers. :)

      AC
      • Re:Paranoia (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Solder Fumes (797270)
        Ahh...I see. Do you know what the extra features are? Was it simply doubling up the 2x4's in which case a tornado can still spear your whole family on a utility pole? Was it steel-reinforced concrete in which case it would have cost more than $3000? I've seen brick houses that were demolished by a tornado. The only way to be safe is to be underground. If a contractor is taking an extra $3000 from homebuilders and implying that you should stay above-ground in that room, I think some investigation is called f
        • Re:Paranoia (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Solder Fumes (797270)
          Unless, of course, there is no option to have a basement and go underground. In that case I guess you just have to deal with the best you can get.
        • Like many geeks with issues :) I have been idly thinking about such things for many years - 25 or so. I've come to the conclusion that it is impossible to build a self-contained building (or even a subsection of a building) for less than a lot more money than anyone here has. Of course I'm talking about survivability against earthquakes - possible even in places like New England, fact fans! - large tidal waves of the sort caused by a 10,000y impactor over ocean, NBC, *AND* such things as marauding mobs of g
        • If a contractor is taking an extra $3000 from homebuilders and implying that you should stay above-ground in that room, I think some investigation is called for.

          There are ways to make it. FEMA outlined guidelines for a saferoom [fema.gov]. With these guidelines, a contractor could build you one which includes both above and below ground guidelines. Also you can purchase one prefabricated [texasshelters.com]. Both call for reinforced concrete as primary building material.

        • Re:Paranoia (Score:5, Informative)

          by stienman (51024) <adavis@u[ ]ics.com ['bas' in gap]> on Sunday September 12, 2004 @02:32PM (#10228642) Homepage Journal
          Typical cheap safe rooms consist of simple 2x4 frame with a layer of 1/2 plywood, then a layer of 16 guage steel.

          A 2x4 at hurricane velocity might breach both the steel and plywood, but it would generally splinter and lose any and all useful energy by the time it gets through - and that's assuming it had enough energy to even make it to the room since it has to go throgh some regular walls/windows/siding/furniture/etc to get to the safe room.

          So yes, such a room can be built cheaply and still have more than adequate protection.

          See what FEMA has to say about safe room construction. [fema.gov] In particular safe rooms cost between $3,000 and $5,000 depending on the type you build and where it is situated. It's much cheaper to build it when the house is built than later, so I can easily see a cost of $3,000 for an average safe room.

          -Adam
        • The only way to be safe is to be underground.

          Unless there's a flood, and/or an earthquake...
      • Re:Paranoia (Score:4, Funny)

        by Illserve (56215) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @04:41PM (#10229299)
        So when the next hurricane/tornado comes, the only things left in the house will be my family and my servers. :)

        You'd let your family into your server room?

        I mean, I know it's a hurricane and all but.... some things you just don't do.

    • Agreed, but I'd like something like that just for the coolness factor.
  • Right. (Score:5, Funny)

    by Zebra_X (13249) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:21PM (#10228029)
    cleverly hidden 550 cubic foot root cellar is roomy enough to hang four elk quarters in and has large shelves for other food storage

    Yes, becuase my FIRST thought was to use the room for hanging elk meat.
    • If you were one of those, yes it would be high on your list..

      Water, shelter, food.. in that order..

      Oh, and wifi access :)
  • by flycrg (801803) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:21PM (#10228030)
    ...when you can just duck and cover?
  • by Money for Nothin' (754763) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:24PM (#10228040)
    Only a few hours after a mushroom cloud was seen at the border of China and N. Korea [slashdot.org], the people of Slashdot are looking for fallout shelters.

    Considering the batshit-crazy Kim Jong Il still runs N. Korea, maybe that's not such a bad idea after all.
  • by Sponge Bath (413667) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:28PM (#10228067)

    Blech! I expect to see LaLa jump out of that hole in the ground.

  • Article text (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:30PM (#10228079)
    The Ultimate Secure Home

    Home front
    The artificial rock front blends in perfectly with the natural environment

    Some years ago, the owners of this property had a log hunting cabin in another part of Colorado. Beautiful, yes, but the wood construction posed numerous problems. Several "near-miss" incidents made the family realize how vulnerable the cabin was to any number of disasters and threats. A winter storm, which blew the front door open, might have caused the water pipes to freeze and break, flooding both the upper and lower levels, resulting in many thousands of dollars damage, had it not been discovered in time. A forest fire, which started when a tree fell on the above-ground power line leading to the cabin, came frighteningly close to the wood structure and to within just a few feet of the above-ground propane tanks. A hailstorm necessitated a new roof, a new paint job, and major repairs to the siding. The large front glass windows were spared from damage, but nevertheless were extremely vulnerable. And finally, when the cabin was broken into and many valuable antiques were stolen, the owners decided to look for a safer kind of structure for their retreat, and a better, more remote location.

    After spending 2 ½ years studying every kind of alternative home construction, everything from earthships made out of spare tires, to rammed-earth construction, to monolithic domes, they ultimately realized there was only one kind of construction that would afford them the kind of security they wanted: an earth home (made with Formwork's patented thin-shell concrete construction technique). The house they finally built is not just any earth home. It is what has come to be known in the industry as a "secure home." It is an unparalleled model of the ultimate secure home. Its many features will amaze you.

    While the term "secure home" is still relatively new to the general public, this unique segment of the home construction industry has, for the past decade, been growing steadily, albeit slowly. Presently, with the increased threat of major terrorist attacks, many more people than ever before are building secure homes. Also, more contractors and consultants have recently dedicated themselves to the concept of disaster-resistant and self-sufficient residences. It is only with a realistic understanding of the potential for terrorist attacks, and the magnitude of the problems they could cause, that one can truly recognize the value of a secure home.

    This patented steel-reinforced concrete earth sheltered structure, properly called a thin-shell dome, is built to withstand almost any natural or man-made disaster you can name. And that's not just an idle promise. These buildings have withstood tornadoes, hurricanes, and earthquakes - some measuring over 7.0 on the Richter scale - and in every case they have come away with no structural damage at all. Unlike monolithic domes, and all other types of home construction, only Formwork's concrete domes can be completely buried deep underground.

    The house has 2472 square feet, with an additional 800 square feet in the attached 24' x 36' underground garage. The main floor of the house consists of a large living room, two bedrooms, two baths, a kitchen, pantry, and laundry closet. Upstairs is a loft and two multi-purpose storage/sleeping rooms. The house currently has ten beds in seven different rooms. There is lots of additional space for other cots or bedrolls. A 22' long x 6' wide hallway leads to the garage. This hall is lined on one side with 18" deep shelf units, providing a considerable amount of quick-access storage. The other wall of this hall is a convenient place to store larger items, such as skis, bicycles, or a vacuum cleaner, that wouldn't fit on the shelves. Additionally, a large storage attic is found above the garage.

    The living room's high-domed ceiling gives the room an open, spacious feeling. A custom steel stairway leads from the loft to a cupola perched on top of the house. Light from the cupola gives the sa
  • by MacBorg (740087) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:33PM (#10228094)
    I mean, I've always liked the idea of having a bunker-house, but when it's this nuts, it's a little overboard. And the page-author is full of dung (vis. the follwing quote) "If the phone lines are ever down it will not be possible to get news via the internet." What century are they in?
    • I agree on the Bunker house, the only problem i ever had with it, though, is the lack of natural light. Every time i see an underground house description (albeit normally they are not as crazy-nutjob as this one), I always wonder if they could use mirrors and fiber-optics to give the underground section of the house alot of natural light...
      • Been out for some time. Everything from prisms attached to stovepipe-type light corridors to massive light fiber bundles.

        What I find ridiculous is the notion that this place is somehow "safe." It uses propane, and it's underground - just close up the ventilation shafts, cut the DC lines from the solar panels, and wait for the poor souls locked inside to come out... or to suffocate.

  • Overboard... (Score:3, Informative)

    by mOoZik (698544) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:38PM (#10228120) Homepage
    I really pity these people. They make the Slashdot tinhat-wearing clique look like a group of upstanding, optimistic netizens. Then again, where would these anti-disaster companies be if there weren't such nutjobs running around and confining their families and lives to isolated hobbit-like crapholes? I can see the need for a storm shelter, or a tornado shelter - but those make sense for those who live in vulnerable areas, but sheesh!

  • by jyristys (546156) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:40PM (#10228127)
    ..And live in the center of a city.

    In Finland. I for one welcome any scared slashdotters.
  • Google cache (Score:5, Informative)

    by Peter_Pork (627313) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:41PM (#10228130)
    The "best shelter" site is already down. You can try Google cache [216.239.39.104]
  • Oops (Score:2, Funny)

    by ravenspear (756059)
    best shelter I've ever seen

    Unfortunately you are the only one who will ever see it.
  • Like, as our Department of Homeland Security advised - sealing your windows and doors with duct tape and plastic sheeting. I mean, it's better to asphyxiate than glow green, right?
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:49PM (#10228160)
    Not because I think it's especially necessary, but because it's just really neat. I mean, if people insist on consuming resources for silly things you gotta admit an underground radiation proof hidden house is a lot more interesting than these thirty million dollar celebrity mansions.

    This a) doesn't label you as a target for people looking for easy money and b) let's you live out those childhood fantasies of having a fort to retreat to (and to be honest, don't we all wish we could disappear into our own basement fort and vanish from the world once in a while?) Plus, there's always that 0.0000001 chance it might actually come in handy due to an event like it was designed for. Not a war probably, but suppose some terrorist sets off a nuclear bomb nearby? Not only would such a place be useful in ducking away from fallout, but unlike a full scale nuclear war a terrorist attack is worth surviving because there's still a world left over to come out to.
    • but suppose some terrorist sets off a nuclear bomb nearby?

      I've seen enough Twilight Zone episodes to know that when the fit hits the shan and a nuke goes off, it's not the nuke or even the terrorists that are the enemy... but ourselves!
    • If "peak oil" is truth, then the people who've built these shelters will be sitting pretty assuming they've also got a couple-years supply of freeze-dried food, potable water, and an energy source.

      Seriously, my #1 fear is the economic collapse that will happen once the free ride of cheap oil is over, but I don't have a survival plan. My plan is essentially starvation suicide (I'll let the assholes and paranoids in the bunkers continue the human race while I sleep the long sleep.)

      --

  • Score... (Score:3, Funny)

    by EvilGoodGuy (811015) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:54PM (#10228180)
    If that doesn't scream either hobbit or smurf to you, then you are crazy. If only I weren't a poor college student.
  • the price... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by bbdd (733681) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:56PM (#10228191)
    frankly, i was surprised at the low price, currently offered at $ 495,000. maybe that's high for the area, but for everything you get, that seems like a pretty good deal.
  • I've always liked this one.

    http://survivalring.org/nuclearsurvival/arktwo/i nd ex.htm
  • by FooAtWFU (699187) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @12:59PM (#10228202) Homepage
    ... that's pretty cool. Hobbit-hole, indeed! I say back down on the "imminent plague" bit and promote it to some environmentalist/Nature-loving types: doesn't have too big of a footprint, "energy-optimized"... you can imagine the little chipmunks and squirrels bounding about on top of the roof. Heck, you could make a small development.. and maybe make it a gated community to boot. Winding roads through wooded hills, no more evidence of human habitation than the driveway will provide...
    • You can imagine the little chipmunks and squirrels bounding about on top of the roof.

      I don't have to imagine it. A squirrel runs across my roof almost every morning and makes enough noise to wake me up, especially when he/she slips and tumbles down into my yard.

      My backyard is a heavily wooded "greenbelt". The squirrels frequently use my house as a thoroughfare (jumping from fence to roof to fence) because it's apparently easier than jumping from tree to tree.

  • Wow, the authour sure mixes things up a bit.

    I'm trying to imagine missiles and microwaves in a Hobbit Hole, best thing I can think of is Bilbo's farts after drinking too much of the old Wine laid down by his father ...

    Hobbit Holes and High Tech - what would Frodo think ?

  • A copy of the Bible, a copy of the Koran, tarot cards, a large pentacle, a feng shui chart, and several dozen pairs of underwear.
  • Sure, they have the solar panels and the propane tanks, and it they can survive a nuclear attack, but can they last through a nuclear winter?
  • by Mr Europe (657225) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @01:12PM (#10228249)
    I feel strongly that it would be more worthwhile to try to remove the cause for a nuclear holocaust than building shelters like this.

    But in US: act in the peace movement and youll probably be judged as a terrorist/communist or something antiamerican.
    • I feel strongly that it would be more worthwhile to try to remove the cause for a nuclear holocaust than building shelters like this.

      Well, that's nice. But while you go talk to Kim Ding Dong, what should we do in the meantime?

      Using your same logic, you don't believe in wearing a condom, because you believe it would be more worthwhile to eradicate all STDs?

      Don't wear a seatbelt because it would be more worthwhile to eliminate all auto accidents?

      Don't cook pork and chicken because you are working to eliminat

      • If we got rid of our own nuclear weapons then we would actually have a leg to stand on, and world support, when we try to prevent others from having them.

        Our current policy of, "Do as I say, not as I do." has not worked very well.

        If we managed to have a worldwide ban rather than the weak non-proliferation treaty, then countries trying to develop nuclear weapons would be under threat of actions similar to Israel's bombing of Osirak to prevent Iraq gaining nuclear weapons; but backed by the UN and the world

      • Well, that's nice. But while you go talk to Kim Ding Dong, what should we do in the meantime?

        The possibility of nuclear (or other) missile hitting US soil is really minimal. And USA is big. Even with ten large explosions most US citizens would be perfectly safe. The possibility to get any benefit of use ones own bomb shelter is zero (with several decimals).
        N-Korea does not have a working nuclear bomb, but it's probably developing it. They still don't have long range missile. And they have a lot of enemies
  • From Ultimate Secure Home [ultimatesecurehome.com]

    "The Big One" will be a genetically-engineered mutant of influenza and para-influenza viruses recombined with acute lymphocytic leukemia viruses. In other words, it will be a strain of the flu that spreads quick killing cancer by sneezing. One can only wonder what the results of Dark Winter would have been if it was done with such a killer virus, instead of just smallpox.

    A little paranoid? The only thing missing is Ned Flanders singing "We'll be safe inside our fortress when th [nyud.net]

    • Adding... (Score:2, Insightful)

      by thrill12 (711899) *
      ... the more quickly-lethal a virus is, the less likely it is to spread far out.
      Ofcourse, the reverse also holds ground.
      Right now, the most lethal *virus* would still be HIV IMHO (IANAM):
      - long incubation time
      - terrible outcome without treatment

      And even with treatment, the toll on healthcare is quite big.
      The only thing making it less dangerous is that it is spread through very distinct ways, and not by air, I guess.
  • by spiritgreywolf (683532) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @01:28PM (#10228335) Homepage Journal
    Many of the sites I read about this talks about how state-of-the art protection can be out in the middle of nowhere, but _getting_ there during a national crisis is another.

    The worst kind of biological exposure is one that has a decent incubation period then nails you later in the blink of an eye.

    You're either already exposed getting there, in which case you bring it with you, or include pointers and tips on how to cover yourself by getting to the safehouse without being exposed - something missed by most pundits on this issue.

    When CNN screams, "We're being bio-attacked!", you get to jam yourself amongst the thralling masses trying to get away? Not good...
  • by Riggs E. (628638) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @01:35PM (#10228362)
    For a truly awesome construction alternative, check out http://www.monolithic.com/gallery/homes/ [monolithic.com] Energy efficeint, structurely superior, and highly affordable. Not to mention one helluva conversation piece!
    • Here's another pretty cool design. I used to live near things guy. He consistently comes up with weird and wonderful things.
      http://www.williamlishman.com/underground.htm

      He also happens to be the "real" person behind the Fly Away Home story.
      http://www.canoe.ca/JamMoviesToronto96/sep8_flyawa y.html

  • by gardyloo (512791) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @01:57PM (#10228450)
    What people have to remember is this:
    Denver, CO is set up to be the next Washington, D.C., in case the latter ever gets wiped out. Norad is based in Colorado Springs. Both of these potential targets are quite far to the northeast of Durango. The closest strategic targets I can think of are really Denver, Colorado Springs, Kirkland AFB in Albuquerque, and Los Alamos, White Sands, etc. in NM, and maybe some proving grounds and bases in Utah and Nevada. Durango is NOT a target, but it's kind of in the middle of these other, good targets. You'd expect to get a bit of fallout there from a large-scale attack. Having a fallout shelter is GOOD, I suppose, if you're worried about that.

    In addition, Durango is one of these "new Aspens", where college students hang out, there are a lot of older locals (ranchers, Navajo, people who showed up before the '70's, mainly), and so forth, but there are a LOT of VERY rich people around (WalMart heir rich; 4th richest in the US rich), who can afford these kind of eccentric houses (and seem to get off on living in this gorgeous place, and ruin the whole atmosphere at the same time because then no one else can afford to live there ).
    Finally, a lot of people hunt in Durango (and all over the mountain West). It's the kind of thing where you get a few days off in the fall to bag an elk or bear. So the guy's comment about elk hindquarters, although strange to a lot of people, are very common to people from the Rockies.
    • In addition, Durango is one of these "new Aspens", where college students hang out, there are a lot of older locals (ranchers, Navajo, people who showed up before the '70's, mainly), and so forth, but there are a LOT of VERY rich people around (WalMart heir rich; 4th richest in the US rich), who can afford these kind of eccentric houses (and seem to get off on living in this gorgeous place, and ruin the whole atmosphere at the same time because then no one else can afford to live there ).


      Yeah, you ar
  • by gricholson75 (563000) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @02:04PM (#10228487) Homepage
    Really, if I had a huge underground complex under my house, I wouldn't tell a soul. I mean, haven't they seen that episode of Twilight Zone.
    • Well, err... Wasn't the guy locked in his underground shelter, because noone knew he was in there ?
      Eventually they did try to get him back, but he was too scared to come out.

      In the end they simply locked the whole place up in a giant dome.
      Impressed me somewhat - proves one thing: even the best disaster planning doesn't take into account that the disaster is not that which you planned for :)
      • Umm... Wrong one. Sorry I don't no of the one you speak of. I was thinking of the one where the whole neighborhood breaks the guys door down on his shelter, arguing he should let other people in.
        • by phillymjs (234426) <slashdot@nosPaM.stango.org> on Sunday September 12, 2004 @02:27PM (#10228625) Homepage Journal
          You're thinking of "The Shelter," [tvtome.com] from the 3rd season of the original Twilight Zone.

          The other poster apparently has in mind "Shelter Skelter," [tvtome.com] from the new Twilight Zone series that aired in the 80's.

          In "The Shelter," everyone knew about the guy's shelter. In "Shelter Skelter," only the guy's wife and small children knew, plus a friend he happened to tell the day the accident happened (who he locked in with him). His wife didn't tell anyone because the guy had become such a survivalist nut that she felt the children were better off growing up without him.

          Both were great episodes.

          ~Philly
        • Re:Twilight Zone ? (Score:2, Insightful)

          by anubi (640541)
          Yeh, I remember that one.

          Just two weeks ago, a similar thing happened to a young teenage girl two houses down from me.

          This is a little offtopic, but the principle is the same. Its what happens when you have something others can take.

          Her parents had to leave on business. It was her first time. Alone. She was frightened and lonely. She called *one* friend to come over and share the evening with her.

          No sooner than her friend got there, could she call a friend over too?

          Out comes the cellphone. Boop

  • ... to run a grow-op.
  • by Ikn (712788) * <{rsmith29} {at} {alumni.nd.edu}> on Sunday September 12, 2004 @02:45PM (#10228709) Homepage
    I for one do NOT welcome our new dominating Overlords, and will be hiding from them in my subterannean lair.
  • by maxpublic (450413) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @04:22PM (#10229213) Homepage
    And that means that if you want to buy an underground shelter you have every right to do so, and fuck the people who insist that you should do other things with your money.

    It's *your* money, not the money of these socialist-wannabes. Screw them and the horse they rode in on.

    Besides, the idea of a fortified home seems pretty neat, even if relatively useless. If I had the money I'd certain do something along these lines. Talk about the ultimate in toys....

    Max
  • by Sloosh13 (812845) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @04:40PM (#10229295)
    Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole, filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell, nor yet a dry, bare, sandy hole with nothing in it to sit down on or to eat: it was a hobbit-hole, and that means...uh...concrete.
  • Woah :p (Score:2, Informative)

    by Southpaw018 (793465)
    Man, /. REALLY hammered this page. It's been completely taken offline. Check the Google cache by going to Google and entering "cache:www.ultimatesecurehome.com" in the search box, or go to The Internet Archive [archive.org] and use their Wayback Machine to pull up the page. Interesting stuff, though it takes some effort to pull up thanks to us geeks ^_^
  • by mnewton32 (613590) on Sunday September 12, 2004 @06:23PM (#10230071) Homepage
    ...compare to your own disaster planning...

    Yes, of course. My own disaster planning...
    I must be missing out on something there. Perhaps because I'm not an American? I don't know, but the only disaster planning I do involves wondering how I'm going to explain my latest eBay purchase to my wife.
  • I'd like a house like this but not because it is so secure (these people seem paranoid to me). I'd like it for a couple of reasons. First, I think that a house designed like this is really capable of expressing the owner. In my case, I'd opt for a very non showy exterior (probably facing the enterances away from any visible road) and have a bright interior with lots of birch, white oak, and ash. Probably not many right angles either.

    Secondly, I think I'd like it because it uses technology to answer a f
  • it is on highway 550 just north of the NM border. ironically, the guy bought it to weather Y2k ;-) it is fairly impressive though, has two diesel generators with enough battery to last a good week without sun... in case you are worried about the end of the world but think it won't reach DGO. BTW, it would be no good for flooding as it is right next to a river in the mouth of a canyon and wouldn't be safe from roving banditos as it is right next to a major highway that connects western CO to ABQ NM. but then

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