Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
IBM

IBM's New Linux Advertising 587

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the big-blue's-big-bucks dept.
Amit Shah writes "IBM is airing a commercial featuring Linux as reported on Economic Times. This could be the first major way to reach out to normal users and explain the benefits of open source and Linux. The ad says, "Collecting data is only the first step toward wisdom, but sharing data is the first step toward community""
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

IBM's New Linux Advertising

Comments Filter:
  • Mirror (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:44PM (#6872841)
    In case the site is slow, here [martin-studio.com] is a mirror.

    Martin Studio Slashdot Policy [martin-studio.com]
    • Want to see the AD ? (Score:5, Informative)

      by ramzak2k (596734) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:00PM (#6873075)
      Check this out [adage.com]
      • by Aadain2001 (684036) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:18PM (#6873288) Journal
        Damn, that gave me goose bumps :)

        Does that make me weird, sad, or both?
        • by mahdi13 (660205)
          Both...it reminded me of the ending to Tron for some reason.
          The old bad guy is dead, let the the young guys take over type of feeling
      • by protohiro1 (590732) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:20PM (#6873302) Homepage Journal
        See it in what ever format you prefer [ibm.com]...the future is open people.
      • or is it ironic that a linux ad is in windows media format?

    • Re:Mirror (Score:3, Informative)

      by Andrewkov (140579)
      Check out IBM's new page, which is referenced by the TV ad: ibm.com/open [ibm.com]. Here is a quote from the page, and this is good marketing:

      On demand business

      Linux is like nothing else in the history of computing--the most unique innovation operating systems have ever seen. It's unprecedented integration. It's an open source operating system. Owned by no single company or private enterprise. Constantly improved by thousands of programmers. And it's getting bigger. Last year, according to the IDC, shipments o

    • Transcript (Score:5, Interesting)

      by The Monster (227884) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @06:56PM (#6874751) Homepage
      Here's the transcript [ibm.com] on IBM's site. My favorite bit is the Latin teacher:

      Res publica non dominetur.
      I think that last word is misspelled, (dominatur) but the gist of the translation is something like
      The commonwealth is not owned/dominated
      which sounds like an in your FACE to the Smoking Crack Oraganization and their shadow overlords in Redmond.
  • by FileNotFound (85933) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:45PM (#6872855) Homepage Journal
    Where's Tux?! Bah! It's not Linux without the penguin...
    • Penguin! (Score:5, Funny)

      by MrHanky (141717) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:55PM (#6873672) Homepage Journal
      It's just a beta! The real text (voiceover) is as follows:

      If Linux were a penguin, it would be growing, fast. Taught by the best. Gaining wisdom between its ears. And sharing. It would be in business, education, government and homes. It would be a nine-year-old penguin chasing the world. So be afraid. Be very afraid.

      The video will be showing the little kid getting slapped around the head by a 2 meter tall penguin.
  • by Thinkit3 (671998) * on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:45PM (#6872861)
    That's the future. This is a great move by IBM, just to get the mindset to the masses. Eventually we'll get beyond copyright and patent, but this is a start--even if it's by a huge corporation.
    • Quite so! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Faust7 (314817) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:02PM (#6873105) Homepage
      "Makes life simpler". Right.

      This is valid point; in fact, it's actually oozing validity. If Linux is going to be presented in mass advertising as a device for simplification, it had better damn well live up to that description.

      Like as not, many people already consider things plenty simple with Windows, especially XP and Server 2003. If Linux is going to simplify that, there must be some readily demonstrable ways in which it does so. Disillusionment is typically quick to take hold in folks, and once it's settled, it's monolithic to overcome.
      • Re:Quite so! (Score:5, Informative)

        by tomhudson (43916) < ... <nosduh.arabrab>> on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:09PM (#6873201) Journal
        Siplifications in favour of linux (some just in the last week or so):
        1. no linux msblaster worms
        2. no linux visual basic for applications cracks
        3. no trains, planes or automobiles stopped by linux viruses, worms or trojans
        4. no linux DRM media players
        5. no linux license fees
        6. no linux authorization codes when you change hardware
        7. no forced upgrade cycle
        8. no having to hunt down 50 cds when trying to rebuild a machine
        If it sounds simpler, it's because it is.
        • All right (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Faust7 (314817)
          no linux msblaster worms
          no linux visual basic for applications cracks
          no trains, planes or automobiles stopped by linux viruses, worms or trojans
          no linux DRM media players
          no linux license fees
          no linux authorization codes when you change hardware
          no forced upgrade cycle
          no having to hunt down 50 cds when trying to rebuild a machine


          Fine. Get the masses to understand, and, more importantly, care about all that and then there's a shot.
      • Re:Quite so! (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Bob9113 (14996)
        Server 2003. If Linux is going to simplify that, there must be some readily demonstrable ways in which it does so.

        Have you ever tried logging into a Windows server and upgrading the operating system over a modem line? It's pretty easy with Linux.
    • by Anonvmous Coward (589068) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:21PM (#6873317)
      " This is a great move by IBM, just to get the mindset to the masses."

      It ain't that great. The ad doesn't even say what Linux is.

      Call me cynical but an 'ad' that doesn't tell you what it's advertising isn't an ad. The people who already know about Linux are the only ones who are going to get anything from it.

      (Note: I'd agree with your point if simply the commercial was better at getting the idea across.)
      • by generic-man (33649) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:33PM (#6873430) Homepage Journal
        Everyone in the IT community has heard of Linux, but most people know it as a community effort. The commercial is targeted at corporate buyers, and seeks to enhance Linux's image by associating the operating system with a well-known, respected company (IBM).

        This isn't the 1950s. Big businesses use commercials nowadays to build brands, not sell products. Consider the most well-known commercials, like Apple's "1984" ad and Coca-Cola's "Mean Joe Green" spot from the '70s. Memorable campaigns don't drill product data into your head.
      • Actually, this is a very smart way to do it. I've seen a lot of 'series' adverts do it.

        This advert is just the 'seeder'. It lays the foundation on which the other adverts with more information are going to rely on.

        No one can explain the entire 'linux' thing in 30 seconds, however, a series of 30 second adverts, with a new one each successive month - all of a sudden every person and their pet turns into an 'expert.

        Regards.
      • Well, it might at least make inroads toward legitimizing Linux in the eyes of PHBs who've heard of it, but just don't trust it.
      • It ain't that great. The ad doesn't even say what Linux is.

        That's the beauty of it - they managed to make an ad that the average PHB can understand.
      • The mpeg got my sister in law to ask me "What's Linux?". The commercial got her *asking questions*, and that's exactly what IBM wants. If I wasn't here to answer, she would've googled it - she wanted to find out more. But since I was here, I introduced her to Knoppix. What comes of it, I don't know. But it's a Very Good Thing.

        And anyway, I find THE BEST ADS, the ones people remember, are either surreal or funny.

        I like this ad. It works for me.
  • First Campaign? (Score:5, Informative)

    by CGP314 (672613) <CGPNO@SPAMColinGregoryPalmer.net> on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:46PM (#6872866) Homepage
    What about their 'Peace, love, Linux' hippy campaign they ran a while back.
  • Share the Love (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Lodragandraoidh (639696) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:46PM (#6872868) Journal
    Share the love...

    Someone gets it, or is doing a good job of pretending to, anyway.
  • not their first (Score:5, Insightful)

    by wawannem (591061) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:46PM (#6872871) Homepage
    IBM ran a good commercial a while back where some cops were walking around a vacant server room while a PHB-type was explaining that all the servers had been stolen. Then the IT guy walks in and says, that they were not stolen but replaced with one linux server. The best part was as the commercial closed, one detective looks at the other and says: "What's a server?" - Classic :)
  • You will soon be seeing a line of xSeries certified for Red Hat Linux AS/ES/WS 3.0.
  • cup holders (Score:2, Funny)

    by foobar31337 (702156)
    /me thinks IBM should also explain in the ad weather or not it will be compatible with all the built in cup holders that come with computers nowadays.
  • by grub (11606) <slashdot@grub.net> on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:47PM (#6872891) Homepage Journal

    Last 12 frames of the ad, bottom left "Linux is (C) SCO and used without permission."

    naw, I made that up.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:48PM (#6872894)
    "Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. Linux may contain intellectual property of SCO. Linux users may be liable for intellectual property infractions. Linux is not to be taken internally. If you have side effects after installing Linux, such as dryness of mouth or shortness of breath, discontinue use and consult a physician. Linux is not for all users. Not all Linux companies go up in value; some go down."
  • by Feynman (170746) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:48PM (#6872895)
    Such commercials . . . show how companies must explain the value of complex technology to consumers who may be unaware of the capabilities of their personal computers or mobile phones.

    You mean I can make a phone call . . . from my car?!

  • by soren42 (700305) * <j.son-kay@com> on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:48PM (#6872903) Homepage Journal
    For my money, I don't know if it gets any better than the IBM Linux ads that Avery Brooks did... particularly memorable was the ad that went something like "In the early ninties, a Finnish college student named Linus Torvalds develops a new operating system, and then he does something remarkable - he gives it away."

    That and "Where the flying cars? I was promised flying cars!"
  • by aurumaeus (673863) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:48PM (#6872906) Homepage
    Letting other people collect the data, and then saying it's yours and suing everyone that has it without your permission, is the road to profitability.
  • by ArmenTanzarian (210418) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:48PM (#6872907) Homepage Journal
    He's nine years old, bright-eyed and hungry to learn. Meet Linux, or a human embodiment of the computer operating system, in a new television commercial by IBM.


    Meet SCO, Linux's molester-uncle.
  • by CGP314 (672613) <CGPNO@SPAMColinGregoryPalmer.net> on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:49PM (#6872910) Homepage
    He's nine years old, bright-eyed and hungry to learn. Meet Linux, or a human embodiment of the computer operating system

    I'm going to say it was a wise choice not to use Linus in the commercial.
  • by jmbauer (650575) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:50PM (#6872920)
    But how can he type while carrying his security blanket?
  • by Sphere1952 (231666) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:50PM (#6872921) Journal
    Big Blue was the bad guy.

    It feels kind of creepy to be cheering IBM on...

    Go IBM!!!!
    • Part of /me is afraid of the big blue behemoth; part of /me is feeling warm and fuzzy about the linux promotion. I'm so confused...
    • When I was a kid, IBM was a corporation. They're still a corporation. Now they're a corporation that's going to make a killing off of a bunch of gullible college kids' programming.
    • -- Am I downloading IP, or am I downloading free speech?

      free beer.
    • IBM ... (Score:3, Interesting)

      by j_w_d (114171)
      realized that Linux has the biggest development staff on the planet, even bigger than IBM. Someone there said, "let's drop AIX. Linux can replace our in-house OS in most areas. Our development costs go down. Support costs won't change. We'll eat the lunch of every major server player on the planet. We can join the OS community AND get a monopoly."

  • Awareness? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward
    A lot of people are already "aware" of Linux but they have no clue what it is. Just the other day one of my co-workers in a memo referred to a product that uses Linux and asked if we should "explore Linux Open-Source programming." She had no clue what Linux or Open Source is but she saw them written somewhere and thought they sounded intelligent in her memo.

    I will save final judgement for when I see the commercial during football on Sunday but based on that article the commercial doesn't do that. I thin
  • In the IBM commercial, a blond, blue-eyed boy sits mum as a stream of celebrities ply him with information on everything from plumbing to the mysteries of the universe.

    I think the image of a little boy being approached and molested by a bunch of creepy strangers sums up the Linux community and ethos to a T.

    But shouldn't it be GNU/Linux?

  • by WinDoze (52234) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:53PM (#6872960)
    In July, IBM reached a three-year sponsorship deal with the NFL.

    They're going to advertise Linux during televised NFL games? Isn't that sort of like advertising beer during Oprah?
  • by mao che minh (611166) * on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:56PM (#6873010) Journal
    I still say that IBM should have enlisted the Dell dude and the Mac gal together for an unequalled, ground breaking, paradigm changing media blitz.

    Just picture the two of them together, stoned out of their gourds, with a guy in a big penguin suit behind them.

  • by Shant3030 (414048) * on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:57PM (#6873021)
    I hope these commercials will address one simple question... Why would I need Linux? Most users (non-techies), probably don't need to learn how to use Linux because Windows provides them with everything they need. Maybe they are targeting large companies, in this campaign, and hopefully they will realize the benefits of using Linux in the business world. For regular users(non-techies), I just don't see the point of using Linux.

    Until it becomes easier to use, more compatible with hardware and less nerdy, the majority of computer users will just not use it. Look at MAC's. People are reluctant to use MAC's because in their eyes, its something that they are not used to.

    Its great that IBM is marketing Linux, I'd certainly love to see my family and friends use it, but they are totally shut off to the idea.
    They are comfortable with using Windows because they just dont have the interest in the learning curve Linux presents.

  • by Faust7 (314817) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:57PM (#6873022) Homepage
    Perhaps it's just that I don't have cable (3 channels that I'd watch out of 60 doesn't justify $45/month) but this is the first I've heard of real Linux commercials. Things in print are fine, but everyone knows TV advertising is as kingly effective as it's always been in getting stuff to sell.

    Any information on whether there have been mass Linux commercials before this? We may be witnessing the beginning of a new era of Linux advertising. Marketing, marketing, marketing--we make fun of the people that major in it, and even more fun of the people that work in it, but it's certainly one of the biggest factors that helped propel Microsoft to the very top of the software heap. With a someday-equivalent force of marketing behind it, could Linux perhaps finally obtain the financial and spiritual backing it needs?
  • Sharks (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Alizarin Erythrosin (457981) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:57PM (#6873036)
    The esteemed P.J. over at Groklaw [weblogs.com] had an interesting analogy related to this IBM campaign:

    AntiFUD is an important part of this battle, which is why IBM is launching an advertising campaign about Linux. But legally they're like circling sharks. Not a sound. Just water rippling ever so slightly on the surface, a brief glimpse of a fin, as they slowly circle. Until it's time to lunge.

    I'd like to add to it by saying that SCO is that loud mouthed kid who's splashing around in the water yelling obscenities and other unpleasantries at the sharks, almost daring them to attack.
  • by tds67 (670584) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @03:58PM (#6873042)
    "Collecting data is only the first step toward wisdom, but sharing data is the first step toward community," Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr advises the boy in the ad...

    ...who later grew up and, upon reaching manhood, was promptly sued by the RIAA, MPAA and SCO for sharing data with the rest of the community.

    • ...who later grew up and, upon reaching manhood, was promptly sued by the RIAA, MPAA and SCO for sharing data with the rest of the community.

      No kidding. Any parent that teaches their children that sharing is a good thing these days needs to have their head examined. Sharing should be revealed to be the evil deceitful thing that it is: stealing. Whether it's sharing music or sharing answers to homework, children should definitely be discouraged from any kind of sharing. Remember kids, sharing = stealin

  • by Bingo Foo (179380) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:00PM (#6873073)
    The ad says, "Collecting data is only the first step toward wisdom, but sharing data is the first step toward community"

    Are you sure that's not: Collecting data is only the first step toward wisdom, but re-theming your desktop a dozen times while your kernel compiles is the death of productivity."

  • by Greyfox (87712) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:01PM (#6873093) Homepage Journal
    I want another round of IBM Advertising with Dennis Leary! Let him go wild on the topic of the SCO lawsuit! Nothing like Leary's special brand of scorn to set the stage for the legal proceedings!
  • by ihatesco (682485) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:01PM (#6873100)
    "Collecting data is only the first step toward wisdom, but sharing data is the first step toward community," Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr advises the boy in the ad, recalling the ethos of the programming community behind Linux.

    The ad closes with the slogan "Linux. The Future is Open. IBM."

    My jaw is wide open.
    Ok, IBM wants to capitalize on Linux, IBM is a company, in the past IBM has been a corrupt monopoly trying to stranglehold their clients with the proprietary ties after fscking them in the first place.

    But the memes passed by this particular advertisement are something radically different than those teached by conventional advertisements and pro-capitalist ethos (consume! consume! don't think about tomorrow! spend now!).

    Really, this stuff is jaw-dropping.
    It's not like the cluetrain stopping in front of IBM (now we only need an express train passing in Darl McBride's office like that Athlon vs Pentium III commercial), but it's like someone saying that the time is mature for an economy based on Free Software to be born and TRY to impose herself on a wide-open scale.
    Not Eazel Gnome Nautilus and crap like that, not the dotcomboom of 121 different Linux distros, but a wide world collaborating on making better, documented, free, opensource and secure systems with minor tweakings among them just to make sure that they suit individual needs. (2414 different Gnu/Linux distros!!! ;D)

    Hell, also Microsoft is committed to a large-scale opensource initiative [globus.org].

    And I also think that this particular advertisement is what we waited in order to say that GNU and Linux have won.

    + + + +
    BSD, on the other hand, is dead... :D (ok, that was a joke)

  • A Good Move (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Urantian (263132) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:05PM (#6873149)
    I appreciate what IBM is doing. The average computer user seems to think that Microsoft is all there is, when it come to an OS.

    The general public needs to be informed that there ARE choice. Imagine if Microsoft were to actually start feeling the sting of lost sales. They might: Lower prices, improve customer service, and wow... focus on stablizing their software!
  • by dasmegabyte (267018) <das@OHNOWHATSTHISdasmegabyte.org> on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:07PM (#6873170) Homepage Journal
    Collecting data is only the first step toward wisdom, but sharing data is the first step toward community.

    Nice slogan. Makes me want to put my hand over my heart and stare knowingly toward the horizon.

    What's it got to do with Linux though? Data sharing seems to have more to do with databases and web services, neither of which are explicitly Linux oriented traits. It seems to me it's not data, but functionality that's shared in the Linux community.

    It's something like this: we both need to build a house. I'm going to need a ladder and a saw, you're going to need a ladder and a saw. If you build the ladder, and share it with me, I'll build the saw and share it with you. It doesn't mean we're going to tell each other what's inside the house, what's going on with the house, etc. No data is shared, just the tools for organizing and arranging it. Sharing the TOOLS makes a community. Sharing data makes, I dunno, an RIAA lawsuit?

    I know, I know. The slogan is meant to strike at executives who make snap decisions and watch golf on the weekends. After all, they're the only ones not using OSS already ;). Doesn't foregive IBM from coming up with a slogan that muddys the already murky question of "What is up with the GNU community?"
    • The word data should've been changed to knowledge, but since this commercial is targeted at the golf-playing executives, data has a more tech-like ring to it.

      Collecting knowledge is only the first step toward wisdom, but sharing knowledge is the first step toward community.

      Sounds better to me.
    • by The Cydonian (603441) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @05:00PM (#6873715) Homepage Journal
      You should have watched the ad before posting. :-)

      The slogan, folks, is not this Zen-like dialogue that Reuters has quoted; the real slogan "The Future is open" and is a great soundbite for OSS/Software Libre.

      Indeed, it is, but one of the many other dialogues on teamwork, G chords, Spanish, aircraft, soccer, bla bla bla... the idea seems to be that folks somehow teach this 9 year old kid, Linux, everything, and that the kid absorbs everything. Which is a great statement to make; next time Joe Superbowlfan reads that, say, they're using Linux while making aircraft, he'll make the connection and hopefully say, "Yeah, it's that intellectual (ie, not just "geek") thing that IBM is advertising".

      In effect, IBM seems to be trying to change the perception of Linux from a geek's plaything to being something that's intellectually all-encompassing in its reach. Haven't seen the earlier IBM Linux ads, but it's an interesting brand strategy; wonder how the other Linux companies will advertise now (if they do, that is; I don't quite watch television, but something tells me that IBM is a first-mover here).

      None of this, of course, tarnishes your point; the distinction between data and functionality is well-taken.


    • What's it got to do with Linux though? Data sharing seems to have more to do with databases and web services, neither of which are explicitly Linux oriented traits. It seems to me it's not data, but functionality that's shared in the Linux community.


      Depends what you define as data. MP3s? Major Applications? Utilities? Protocols? File formats? Expertise? Source Code?
      All of those I consider to be types of data. I think it goes without saying that it won't be buisness data but to the fact that a lot of t
    • Programs are data (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Per Abrahamsen (1397)
      Just ask any Lisp programmer.

      I think it is clear that data is used in a broad sense, where it includes information, knowledge and skills, a lot of which is embedded in the Linux kernal.
  • NFL.com (Score:3, Interesting)

    by leviramsey (248057) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:12PM (#6873238) Journal

    So IBM has entered into a sponsorship deal with the NFL... lessee what the League's webservers are running:

    yep, NFL.com runs Linux [netcraft.com].

  • by Junks Jerzey (54586) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:21PM (#6873316)
    This could be the first major way to reach out to normal users and explain the benefits of open source and Linux

    This is a very tough sell, IMO. I'll also add that lumping the two together--"open source" and "Linux"--maybe isn't a good idea.

    With perfect honesty, as someone who has used and programmed various OSes and hardware, the differences between Linux and Windows are few. Both are hugely complex from the user's point of view, and both are arguably incomprehensible on the source level. (Remember, you can't just talk about the Linux kernel, but the entire package including XFree86, drivers, the window manager, KDE, etc.) So it's not like either one is a clear winner in terms of ease-of-use or architectural cleanliness. It used to be that Linux was more stable, but with Windows 2000 that's no longer true. UNIX-alikes are generally more virus resistant than Windows, but that's a tough reason to insist that someone change all of his or her work habits and software. Remember, too, that patches for the recent Windows virii were available before infections started. Proper system administration (sadly!) plays a big role in security.

    On the "open source" angle, I think that too much of an association with Linux is hurting the term. The Linux kernel is open source, yes, but we need to stop acting like you have to have one in order to have the other. There is a lot of open source software for Windows, for example. The "Chandler" email program, which is attempting to replace Outlook and Exchange, is going to run under Windows. Heck, Emacs and gcc both run under Windows. So do all of the GNU utilities. And Perl. And Python. And Tk.

    As much as we all like to think we have the inside track on the superior OS--and, indeed, it may still be slightly superior--it's a case of it not being so far and away superior that it's clearly so.
    • by tjwhaynes (114792) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:55PM (#6873661)

      With perfect honesty, as someone who has used and programmed various OSes and hardware, the differences between Linux and Windows are few. Both are hugely complex from the user's point of view, and both are arguably incomprehensible on the source level. (Remember, you can't just talk about the Linux kernel, but the entire package including XFree86, drivers, the window manager, KDE, etc.) So it's not like either one is a clear winner in terms of ease-of-use or architectural cleanliness. It used to be that Linux was more stable, but with Windows 2000 that's no longer true.

      Well, my system uptimes tell a different story. But you don't have to trust my figures - take a look at Netcraft uptimes [netcraft.com]. These aren't the highest uptimes of all - almost without exception, the best uptimes are held by BSD derivatives (around 5 years). For the most popular sites, Linux tends to knock in around 100+ days. Windows 2000 knocks around in the high-20's, low 30's.

      Have a nice day.
      Toby Haynes

  • by aliens (90441) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:25PM (#6873364) Homepage Journal
    Well, not really commercials, but some weird lil cartoons. Enjoy.

    http://www-1.ibm.com/servers/eserver/linux/fun/i nd ex.html?c=eserver&n=linuxfun_callout_servershome&t =advertise#
  • by NanoGator (522640) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:30PM (#6873405) Homepage Journal
    .... can you really envision somebody who's uninformed about Linux watching this commercial and making anything of it?

    Me personally, I'd have at least mentioned that it's free or that it isn't held by a single corporation. This commercial looks more like the sequel to A.I. or D.A.R.Y.L..
  • by Jerk City Troll (661616) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:48PM (#6873597) Homepage

    You can go straight to IBM's site [ibm.com] and download Real Media (high [rbn.com] | low [rbn.com]), QuickTime (high [rbn.com] | low [rbn.com]), or MPEG (high [rbn.com] | low [rbn.com]) versions of it.

    And of course, if you use MPlayer [mplayerhq.hu], you can watch the movie from the Windows Media stream simply with:

    mplayer mms://windowsmedia.dvlabs.com/adcritic/ibm-linux-p rodigy.asf

    Enjoy.

    Side note: does anyone else get the impression of Nazi era propaganda in this? It's an awesome ad, but come on: a blond-haired, blue-eyed kid? Why would such a child be the pinnacle of humanity? Just a thought, please don't moderate me for it.

  • by Tsu Dho Nimh (663417) <abacaxi@NoSpaM.hotmail.com> on Thursday September 04, 2003 @04:55PM (#6873668)
    This is a good idea to preced desctop migration shove. First they have to get the name in front of Joe Sixpack-per-game, then they can start teaching what it can do for Joe, his wife, the kids and the granny.
  • Spooky Ad (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Quietti (257725) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @05:05PM (#6873774) Journal
    Anybody else thought "Joe 90" and the Aryan Race, while looking at that commercial? IMHO, not the kind of publicity Linux needs.

    I'd rather see the idea that other poster mentioned (show a bunch of geeks with glee in their eyes, each in a different country, and state "They are working on your future; for free. Linux: the future is open.") be implemented, that would give the right message. One of the geeks should be Linus himself, others could be e.g. Andrew Trigell, Brian Behlendorf, etc. and the names could be printed onscreen, to introduce each of them.

  • by Shane (3950) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @05:21PM (#6873932) Homepage
    Which in this context I believe means:

    Thing belonging to the common public, no one person may rule over it.
  • by overshoot (39700) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @05:27PM (#6873989)
    I found a copy of "The Heist" but all of the other (I'm told great) IBM/Linux ads don't seem to be available. Anyone know where MPEGs of them can be obtained?
  • by PinkX (607183) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @05:28PM (#6873998) Homepage
    High quality version here [rbn.com]. And there is also a text-only version of the script here [ibm.com].
  • IBM Linux Stories (Score:3, Interesting)

    by ffatTony (63354) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @05:42PM (#6874092)

    I'd like to hear stories from anyone concerning linux use within IBM. The contractors who are working with me (large credit card company producing banking software) were moaning to me the other day that even though IBM is gung-ho about linux they are still primarily a windows shop (e.g. sales people and even developers [those not doing linux development at least]) are all on windows or aix boxes and not linux. His words (somewhat paraphrased) were "Linux... good enough for our customers, but not us..."

    Does anyone have info to the contrary? I love free software and linux (although I'd jump ship the second something "cooler" comes along :) and I appreciate IBMs current posturing, I'm just a little worried by the above sentiments.

    • Re:IBM Linux Stories (Score:3, Interesting)

      by ciphertext (633581)

      There is a large majority of business productivity applications that work on require you to use a windows platform. Nearly everyone in the world uses MS Office on an Intel platform. I know that AIX will no longer be supported by IBM in the not so distant future, and they are in the process of porting the AIX apps to linux. However, their consulting branch nearly without exception uses windows and tools designed for windows. They have to for nearly all of their clients use windows at the desktop level.

  • by stanwirth (621074) on Thursday September 04, 2003 @06:53PM (#6874731)

    The need to reach a diverse audience is growing, as studies show that technology buying is more frequently decided by business managers rather than technical specialists.

    Correct. Which is also why the PHBs frown on use of Open Source in general, even when the company's directors have decided to go in an Open Source direction, unfortunately.

    The PHBs can more effectively control the technical specialists when every time the technical specialist turns around to solve a simple problem or do something new, it requires purchasing something .

    Purchasing something, in turn, requires providing lenghly explanations to these weasels in middle IT management who have never written a line of code in their lives, but who desperately need to keep justifying their existence by throwing around new buzzwords in *their* management meetings. Take away their purchasing power by using Open Source, and the poor dears will flounder -- and founder.

    Also, the way these PHB's get to feel important, is by the sheer number of staff and dollars in their command. Fewer dollars for software that can be supported by fewer people, means the PHB is less important--in both his own eyes, and in the eyes of his peers -- other PHB's.

    If the techo can be the hero just on the basis of having acquired, modified, fully tested and deployed something before PHB even gets wind of it, good-bye PHB.

    Open Source threatens to take away a whole layer of IT "management" which, in the interest of the company's productivity and profitability is a GOOD thing. But not in the interests of the smarmy layer of IT "management" that is so clearly undermined by the Open Source process.

    So IBM has to market to company directors and senior management, because their interest is in the company's productivity and profitability.

    Perhaps IBM needs to air a commercial which features a lowly techo and a company director violently agreeing on an Open Source deployment that has saved the company millions, with a PHB middle management drone making increasingly weak arguments against it, while the PHB is taking back-handers and getting his latest round of meaningless buzzwords and lame, losing anti-linux rhetoric from some MicroSlut PR drone.

To restore a sense of reality, I think Walt Disney should have a Hardluckland. -- Jack Paar

Working...