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The Almighty Buck Software

MoneyDance 2003 Reviewed 254

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the free-money-programs-but-no-free-money dept.
TheMadPenguin writes "For those of you who may not have heard, MoneyDance 2003 was released on March 28th, 2003 for general public consumption. It is available for Linux, MacOS X, and also Windows. Geared toward current Intuit Quicken and Microsoft Money users, MoneyDance 2003 is packed full of features. It's reviewed at MadPenguin.org."
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MoneyDance 2003 Reviewed

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:02AM (#5807217)
    I'm just curious when MoneyDinner, MoneyMovie, and MoneyGoBackToMyPlace are scheduled for release!
  • Moneydance (Score:5, Informative)

    by lostchicken (226656) on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:05AM (#5807230)
    It's not free. See Here. [moneydance.com]
    However, GNUCash [gnucash.org] will run on all the platforms listed, and is free.
    • Re:Moneydance (Score:3, Insightful)

      by override11 (516715)
      I dont believe the article said ANYWHERE it was free.

      Because it will run on Linux, you assume it is? You know,, Linux will never become the de-facto OS if people are not willing to PAY for developers to make software for it.
      • ... but it was from the free-money-programs-but-no-free-money dept.
      • I dont believe the article said ANYWHERE it was free. Because it will run on Linux, you assume it is? You know,, Linux will never become the de-facto OS if people are not willing to PAY for developers to make software for it.

        Who ever said they wanted Linux to become the de-facto OS?

        I know I sure as hell don't. I just want to use it, and not have anyone try to prevent me from using it.

      • I've had a few problems with Quickbooks in recent times so I have moved over to GnuCash. It isn't perfect, but I have the source code and the price is right and it can be easily tailored.

        I don't object to a product that costs money, but it should, at least, work!!!

      • I dont believe the article said ANYWHERE it was free.

        I can forgive someone for thinking that the product might be free. This forum is not typically thought of as an advertising medium for commercial products; it's common for the topic to run in the vein of how to expand (or reclaim) dwindling rights, or to discuss a new technology (like a chip) that doesn't imply an immediate point of sale transaction between a company and a reader. It may not be illegitimate to have PR for a paid product here, but k

      • True, but this is slashdot. Its barely news if it is free, but if it isn't free this is just an advertisement. Why is a random commercial application getting released news?
      • However, if you read the write up at the top of the page and what the moderator said ("from the free-money-programs-but-no-free-money dept.") then you would get the idea that it was free.

        Not to mention that if you read the article it never gives a price. In fact, it states "I filled out the information on their free download link and that took me to the instruction page." It was not until I read the comments of the review that I first learned it was not a free product. I can easily forgive this person f
    • However, GNUCash will run on all the platforms listed

      How can you sleep at night when you tell us such lies? No where on the site do I see anything about running on Windows. If you are trying to move people from away from MS software, you have to do it slowly to give them a chance to cope.
    • However, GNUCash will run on all the platforms listed, and is free. Actually, GNUcash doesn't run on windows, the third 'platform' listed. Unless you're using a more narrow definition of platform than most.
      • by pmz (462998) on Friday April 25, 2003 @09:04AM (#5807829) Homepage
        Actually, GNUcash doesn't run on windows, the third 'platform' listed.

        True. Actually, it isn't portable beyond systems that have GNOME 1.4 and a plethora of other libraries installed. It's also GTK-based. The huge number of dependencies in GNUCash are its greatest portability weakness, IMO. I doubt it would ever run on Windows without substantial re-engineering.

        • Actually, GNUcash doesn't run on windows, the third 'platform' listed.


          True. Actually, it isn't portable beyond systems that have GNOME 1.4 and a plethora of other libraries installed. It's also GTK-based. The huge number of dependencies in GNUCash are its greatest portability weakness, IMO. I doubt it would ever run on Windows without substantial re-engineering.

          About the GTK base. If I remember correctly the GIMP is also GTK based. And it has been ported [gimp.org] to Windows. Not to say that this would make

    • Re:Moneydance (Score:5, Insightful)

      by jdreed1024 (443938) on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:54AM (#5807444)
      However, GNUCash [gnucash.org] will run on all the platforms listed, and is free.

      First of all, GNUcash does not run on Windows without much frobbing. Yes, I know we don't like Windows 'round these parts, but there are plenty of folks who do. Secondly, GNUcash is not designed to be a drop-in replacement for Quicken. This program clearly is. I just downloaded the Windows version, and I'm happy with it. I'll never use MS Money or Quicken again.

      If we want Linux to succeed, we have to acknowledge that there is room for proprietary software. (Linus has the right idea - leave it up to the users to decide what they want to use it for). If you don't like proprietary software, don't use it. But Free Software is about Freedom. Kind of like the Freedom to run whatever programs you want. If GNUcash is a better program than Moneydance, then Moneydance will die, without any assistance from the zealots. If, OTOH, Moneydance fills another niche, then both will survive.

      Like it or not, software like this is vital to getting Linux on the desktop. If people want to pay, let them pay. But let them decide which they like better - don't presume to dictate their software choice to them. GNUcash takes effort to set up, especially on some MacOS X and Windows. Sure, it's not a _LOT_ of effort, but it's more than the standard "double click install.exe" that folks are used to.

      I'm getting tired of seeing responses to every non-free Linux program mentioned on /. along the lines of "Boo, it's proprietary, use $bar instead". If you know of and use a better, l33ter program to accomplish the same task, then maybe, just maybe, you're not the intended audience of the new piece of software. In that case, don't use it. But why disparage it in front of potential users? Sure, there are some things to be worried about. Like when MS releases Office and Windows Media Player for Linux, I'll start to get nervous, and recommened OpenOffice and Mplayer instead. But when a company comes along with a good product, and sells it for a reasonable price, don't bitch just for the sake of bitching.

      Lastly, let's not forget the goal of this program. A drop in replacement for Quicken, available for Linux, OS X, and Windows. The last platform is perhaps the MOST important. The installation on Windows is as easy as any other Windows program. And it reads QIF files. And it has most Quicken features. But it's not Quicken. And this is excellent. Because guess who makes Quicken? Our good friends at Intuit, makers of the wonderful TurboTax with activiation that we were all bitching about a while back. If Intuit can lose some market share because of this program, it's still a good thing. Because it's taking people away from a company that treats their customers like criminals.

    • Free != good.
      GNUCash is a wonderful program to use, IF you can get it running. Unfortunately, installing it, due to RPM dependancy hell, is a nightmare - I don't know if it still says this, but their website used to say "Unless version 1.6 came with your distribution, it's most likely better to use 1.4 since there's so many dependancies."

      I'm willing to pay the $40 or whatever Moneydance costs in return for a program that actually works. GNUcash worked great for me, for awhile, but they keep coming out w
  • by Renegade Lisp (315687) on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:05AM (#5807232)
    A user's comment on this review at madpenguin.org states the obvious: What about GnuCash [gnucash.org]? It turns out that GnuCash is very comparable to this product in terms of features, and for somebody who'd rather stick with free software, there should be no rational need to buy MoneyDance.

    I've been using GnuCash for my personal accounting for a year and a half now, and I must say that it's absolutely enough for all that I need (I'm a freelance consultant), and lots of interesting new features are on the horizon.

    • conrad on gnucash (Score:5, Informative)

      by Renegade Lisp (315687) on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:11AM (#5807256)
      More interesting than the review itself, here is conrad's comment from madpenguin.org (I'm including it below because the server is already slashdotted):
      For those of you who would be prepared to pay money for Moneydance, can I recommend that you look at Gnucash and save your money. MadJudu waves his hand at Gnucash and dismisses it, and then goes on to praise MoneyDance for now doing what Gnucash has mostly been able to do for several years.

      The Gnucash interface mightn't have the "lean and mean" look that MadJudu favours, but it is fairly simple and after a small amount of aclimatization (it is very different from quicken), you will (in my opinion) find it far more useful.

      Gnucash does most of the other things MoneyDance does, plus a few extras. Gnucash can interface with HBCI (the German online computer banking standard). Gnucash doesn't have the budgeting features (yet), but does have simple Accounts Payable/Accounts Receivable functionality for people with slightly more complicated accounting requirements.

      Most of the complaints and comments MadJudu makes about MoneyDance also apply to Gnucash. In fact, I almost wondered if MadJudu was reviewing Gnucash at times.

      So, whats the biggest selling point for Gnucash over MoneyDance? Price! Why spend US$30, when the Gnucash developers charge you the princely sum of NOTHING in whatever currency you prefer. Same low price, always!

      The biggest disadvantage (for those so afflicted) is that Gnucash does not run on any Microsoft OS. Linux, MacOS-X, and FreeBSD are available. Probably others too.

      Get Gnucash from your favourite Linux distribution (its packaged by all major distributions), or visit http://www.gnucash.org/ for more details.

      • Re:conrad on gnucash (Score:2, Interesting)

        by tdvaughan (582870)
        I agree - GNUCash has been great for my fairly basic needs (once I got it installed that is - that really epitomised dependency hell for me and I still haven't installed Finance::Check properly). Since I'd never used a personal accounting package before the biggest hurdle was getting to grips with the concepts of double entry accounting. That was a really useful skill for me to pick up. And it isn't entirely bug-free (some of the reporting functions didn't work properly but in day-to-day use it's been fi
    • Gnucash is a good program, but you better know how to use your ldd command to get the bastard installed. It relies on so many libraries that a newbie would get fed up with it and run quicken.

      Great program when running, but horrible to get it there.
      • by xiaix (247688)
        I remember those days. However the install has gotten much easier (at least for the lazy.) The Red Hat RPM installs fine through up2date, and the gentoo install also works without a hitch. Not a single dependency / library problem, although if you want to use the stock updates you may need to add some things via cpan.

        I used to dual boot solely for Quicken, but that stopped years ago when they made internet explorer an integrated part of their product. I have been using Gnucash since, and with the new feat

      • Hmmm...

        > emerge gnucash

        Gotta love Gentoo [gentoo.org] ;-)

      • Seems pretty easy to me.
      • Gnucash is a good program, but you better know how to use your ldd command to get the bastard installed. It relies on so many libraries that a newbie would get fed up with it and run quicken.

        Great program when running, but horrible to get it there.

        Hmmm... Maybe its time for you to try a new Linux distribution. Or you can continue to suffer if you prefer. As some others have pointed out:

        In Gentoo:

        emerge gnucash

        In Debian:

        apt-get install gnucash

        Furthermore, in Gentoo (and possibly in Debian as well), you

      • by pmz (462998)
        Great program when running, but horrible to get it there.

        All the other responses to this post say "just use apt-get" or "up2date" or "emerge this or that". That's all nice and dandy, but part of the freedom of Open Source is being able to compile from the source from the authors! Getting GNUCash to compile on Solaris, for example, is absolute torture. I don't want to know how much pain and suffering the people at Debian, Red Hat, and Gentoo had to go through to make their one-shot commands actually wor
    • by pongo000 (97357)
      Imagine a world where all those people who would otherwise shell out $30 for MoneyDance would be willing to donate half of that to support "free" comparable software such as Gnucash.

      Just imagine.
      • I'm imagining it... It would mean that the GnuCash people would be making barely enough money to pay for their network connection and server costs. Desktop Linux applications aren't making anyone rich... just ask Ximian, or that game porting company that just went out of business (I forget the name).

  • Delete protection (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mccalli (323026) on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:11AM (#5807260) Homepage
    From the review: Deleting a transaction is quick and painless by selecting the transaction you want to delete and pressing the Delete Button. And as an added delight it doesn't ask you the obnoxious question "Are you sure?"

    But these are my accounts! I want to be protected against accidently deleting things. To take a random example, suppose I think I've clicked into a text field to start typing, whereas what I've really done is just highlighted the whole transation. I press delete and...

    Oops. Hope I still have the bank statements for that one. I'll enjoy tracking the discrepency down, I'm sure...

    Sometimes, it's good to have confirmation required before performing a destructive task. Imagine a similar review saying "And better still, no pesky usage screen or prompt - just typing the command name instantly low-level formats your SCSI RAID array...".

    Cheers,
    Ian

    • by BiAthlon (91360) on Friday April 25, 2003 @08:42AM (#5807696)
      Rather than keep me from doing something how about having a robust undo function.

      You just deleted a transaction. Oops, didn't mean to do that. Undo. Viola! Everything is back the way it was and no stupid "Are you really sure you want to do what you just said you wanted to do" prompts.
  • The money dance looks a bit too similar to the hokey-pokey!
  • by quebeck (652245) on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:12AM (#5807262)
    Did anyone else read this as "MonkeyDance 2003" and think it was some Steve Ballmer rave event?
  • Warning - (Score:5, Funny)

    by vasqzr (619165) <vasqzr@netscaDEGASpe.net minus painter> on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:16AM (#5807274)

    This site is NOTHING like Hampster Dance [hampsterdance2.com]!!

  • by Rinikusu (28164) on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:17AM (#5807282)
    Maybe they don't like the /. referral tags?

    Again for all the "free software people" and the million and one "JUST USE GNUCASH!" folks, here is something for you:

    Free software may be fine and dandy, but some of us don't actually mind *paying* for software if said software does the job well. Shocking, isn't it? Free is not the end all, all encompassing criteria for a great majority of computer users out there. I know, you're trying to change that, but face it: Commercial software is not inherently evil, Proprietary software is not evil, RMS be damned.

    Here's something to ponder: With OpenSource software, I get the source and I can tweak the software any which way I want! Yay! So, after I spend a few weeks poking my way around the source code and finally figuring out where and how to make the changes I need, I could've just gone down to BestBuy and bought another copy of Money or Quicken and have been done with it. What I'm buying is *convenience*. Ever notice that the QuickEMart on the corner sells stuff at quite a premium over the grocery store down the street? Convenience. Sometimes convenience costs money, and I'm willing to pay the "tax" to get something now, not 3 weeks from now.

    • by sultanoslack (320583) on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:33AM (#5807349)

      Sadly you've missed the point of Free Software.

      • Free Software isn't software that you don't pay for. You must be new here.
      • Let's say you want to integrate i.e. Quicken / GnuCash into your business. There are features in there that are valuable to you and not available in any package (i.e. things specific to your workflow). Sure, you might have to pay one of the local geeks [EUR/$]1000 to hack that feature in, but you can't do that for any price with most proprietary software.
      • See point one again. If you want stuff from Free Software, you might have to pay for it. But I assure you that people exist that will cater to your whims for a price. :-)
      • I generally don't reply to stuff like this, but take a gander at my user ID. I'm definately not new here.

        Second, Just because Free Software can be charged for, just about every post here criticizing MoneyDance will be based on "It's not Free (in beer)" and "it's java! Java sux0r5!". I chose to provide an alternative viewpoint to the first (and let someone else handle the java part).

        Third, I'm a desktop user. If I were running a business, GnuCash may or may not meet my needs. Can you tell the IRS to
        • You're pretty new here, relatively speaking, but that's not really important.

          The question of whether GnuCash *works* is important. If it doesn't do what you need it to do, you can either choose not to use it, or modify it until it does what you need. Nobody would expect you to make your business rely upon any piece of software before it works the way you need it to.

          On the other hand, relying on a proprietary product means that features you want or require depend upon the developer. If it doesn't meet your
          • You're pretty new here, relatively speaking, but that's not really important.

            Why, back when I was young first posts meant somethin'...oh well...anyway...

            Sometimes the best solution may be to use a proprietary product for awhile, while you work on a longer term free software solution.

            But let's say you pay some geek $1000 to hack GnuCash to do exactly what you need. You've basically branched out a tree for yourself. Now a new GnuCash release comes out that fixes, say, a few critical bugs and has a few
          • You're pretty new here, relatively speaking, but that's not really important.

            You're pretty new here yourself, Mr. 6869. :) Isn't everything relative?

            On the other hand, relying on a proprietary product means that features you want or require depend upon the developer. If it doesn't meet your needs today, you have no way to ensure it ever will. If your needs change over time, you don't have the ability to adapt the software to your new requirements.

            Although in the case of Moneydance, there's an open AP [moneydance.com]
      • by Necroman (61604)
        As your parent post said, you are paying for convenience. This really falls into a time is money kinda thing.

        Sometimes I want software that just works, and I need it right now. I don't want to have to download some open source program, get that working on whatever machine I have, then find out the X feature is not implemented yet or has a few bugs in it.

        For the most part, commercial software will pass this test. You can normally just read the back of the box and it will tell you the features it has, an
      • "but you can't do that for any price with most proprietary software. "

        It's called being a VAR. Most proprietary software have partnership agreements that you can enter into to build customized solutions which integrate with their products.

        "See point one again. If you want stuff from Free Software, you might have to pay for it. But I assure you that people exist that will cater to your whims for a price. :-) "

        The only difference is with the VAR, they can make the custom changes and then spread the cost o
    • by Zigg (64962) on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:35AM (#5807362)

      So, after I spend a few weeks poking my way around the source code and finally figuring out where and how to make the changes I need, I could've just gone down to BestBuy and bought another copy of Money or Quicken and have been done with it. What I'm buying is *convenience*.

      Of course you are, but you are assuming that you absolutely will be able to buy the feature you want by swinging on down to the store and buying your copy of whatever. Simply because you're in the store waving your credit card around doesn't make the feature you want magically appear.

      You see, if the vendor doesn't think the feature you want is worth implementing, it won't get implemented; proprietary software developers are generally paranoid about giving you the means to implement it or pay someone else to implement it.

    • Free software may be fine and dandy, but some of us don't actually mind *paying* for software if said software does the job well. [...] What I'm buying is *convenience*.

      What you are buying is a hostage situation for your data. What do you do if MoneyDance goes out of business? (No need to belabor all of the underhanded tactics software vendors can and do use to coerce upgrades by holding one's data hostage: MoneyDance isn't Sun Microsystems or Microsoft, but the end user's vulnerability is the same, and
    • I can't help but get the feeling that you're confusing the ability to modify the source code with some kind of necessity to do so. Most of the open source software I use does what I want without me having to change a single line of code, as does most of the equivalent closed source. The difference is that if a program doesn't do something I want and it's open source I can do something more constructive about it than submit feature requests, wait and hope not to get fobbed off.

    • Free software may be fine and dandy, but some of us don't actually mind *paying* for software if said software does the job well. Shocking, isn't it?

      I feel you should read the writings of Stallman, in particular the article about the early days of the GNU project. In particular, I'd note that Stallman made a living for many years by selling tapes with emacs on for $150 - it's free software, but people paid for it.

      The issue of free software has very little to do with "cheapness", and everything to do w

  • Mirrors (Score:5, Informative)

    by brejc8 (223089) on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:18AM (#5807283) Homepage Journal
    Mirror [man.ac.uk] here.

  • For those of you who may not have heard

    Yes, those of us who don't read Slashdot [slashdot.org].
  • I read it as MONKEYDANCE. Here, I was picturing...well...I suppose it's best left to my imagination. I'll let yours do it's own thing.
    • I read it as MONKEYDANCE. Here, I was picturing...well...

      Steve Ballamer? Funny, I was reading an interview on News.com with Stevie and the came to Slashdot, and I read it as "MonkeyDance" as well.
  • How well does this program and GunCash work with online banking systems? I've read that they both do it, but how well does it work in the real world, and how does it compare in terms of ease of use to Quicken or Money?

    • I can't find anything on the site about MoneyDance handling mortgages. Does it?

      (And, of course, there is a difference in the way interest is calculated on Canadian mortgages, compared to US ones, so that would be something else ... at least for a Canuck like me.)

      Also, why doesn't someone just build a bunch of Perl/PHP scripts that hook into a database, and make financial tracking a web-based application? People could install it on their box and access it from anywhere they wanted ... or just run it on a
  • For those of you who may not have heard, MoneyDance 2003 was released on March 28th, 2003 for general public consumption. It is available for Linux, Mac OSX, and also Windows. Geared toward current Intuit Quicken and Microsoft Money users, MoneyDance 2003 is packed full of features.

    This is more than a software release to the Linux world. It is a step forward. Until now, Linux had a fairly large hole which was void of proper personal finance software (aside from the obvious gnucash), but MoneyDance seems

  • by MCRocker (461060) on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:41AM (#5807397) Homepage
    This release is a real coup for MoneyDance's author, Sean Reilly. A while ago, he sold MoneyDance to Apgen. At first this worked out really well because they added a lot of resources to the project and development really took off.

    Unfortunately, when Apgen's fortunes started to fade with the end of the .com bubble, the MoneyDance staff was slowly laid off until even Sean was let go.

    Like many other zombie probjects, the MoneyDance web page was not taken down and Apgen was still selling it even though nobody was home. There was no support at all. The mailing list was a scary place then. It took months for people to figure out what was going on. Apgen didn't respond at all to help requests and the list turned to a big discussion on what the alternatives were.

    Somehow, Sean managed to get the rights to MoneyDance back just a few months ago and started working on the new version that he just released.

    Lots of good ideas have sunk in the last year or so of economic trouble in the software industry. Most will never resurface and have been lost forever. This is a real coup for Sean and the MoneyDance users that Sean was able to resurect this fine project and produce a new version in such a short time.

    The Apgen folks have been very quiet about the whole thing for obvious reasons, but I think they are an example to follow. They made a valiant effort to promote MoneyDance, but when it didn't work out they set MoneyDance free instead of locking it up and throwing away the key. For some strange reason, this isn't the norm.
  • Kupo Kupo! (Score:4, Funny)

    by JessLeah (625838) on Friday April 25, 2003 @07:59AM (#5807469)
    If Mog does the Money Dance, does he start tossing GP at enemies? And what does it change the background to? O_o
  • Palm version (Score:3, Informative)

    by DoorFrame (22108) on Friday April 25, 2003 @08:07AM (#5807505) Homepage
    One of the reasons that I'm able to keep track of my finances is that there's a Palm Pilot Quicken tool which allows me to track everything I do throughout the day, even when I'm nowhere near a computer to enter the transaction. Without this tool remembering every expense was getting extremely difficult and I was considering giving up on the project.

    Now, before I even consider looking at this program, does it have a similar attachment?
    • Re:Palm version (Score:2, Informative)

      by MCRocker (461060)
      No, it does not.

      However, there is an extension mechanism developer's toolkit [moneydance.com], so you could add a synchronization mechanism.

      Porting or creating a mini version might be difficult because Palm's Java support is somewhat lacking. It would probably be a lot of work to get a port of MoneyDance working on J2ME, MID Profile.
    • Re:Palm version (Score:2, Informative)

      by cyberassasin (4943)
      There is a Palm Sync Extension... Available here [moneydance.com]

      It will support a variety of palm checkbook apps, such as Pocket Money, Splash Money, and the Palm Expense app..

      Works well...

      Good Luck
  • by Johann (4817) on Friday April 25, 2003 @08:26AM (#5807594) Homepage
    I have used MD for about 4 years. It was the final piece of software that allowed me to delete Windows for ever. I am happy to see it return back to the capable hands of Sean Reilly. Appgen did nothing with it.

    I have tried GNU Cash and while they have similar features, MD is *much* easer to use. MD has *way* better reporting and IMHO continue to have better support for on-line banking.

    Hard-core Linux users may like GNU Cash. I certainly support the GNU project and I am grateful that GNU Cash is a viable alternative. But, if you have been using MS Money or Quicken, you probably will feel more comfortable using MD, especially 2003.

    Another bonus for MD is that it is a Java application, so it will run on *any* platform. So, if you are still a dual-boot Linux/Windows user (why?), you can run MD on either one and not have to reboot simply to balance your checkbook.

    BTW - $30 is a small price to pay for organized finances.
    Jeff
  • I use Intuit Quicken to track investments as well as my various accounts. Although Quicken claims to export data in QIF format, some information is missed or corrupted. The article warns of possible duplicate transactions, and the reviewer omitted two of his accounts because he didn't want to fix them up manually. He speculates that the problem is with the software that created the QIF files, and I have verified this by trying unsuccessfully to import a QIF file back into Intuit Quicken.

    It appears that
  • by Fished (574624) <amphigory AT gmail DOT com> on Friday April 25, 2003 @08:45AM (#5807715)
    I particularly like Budget [snowmintcs.com]. Unlike GnuCash, Quicken, and MoneyDance the last time I tried it, it actually makes budgeting the central feature of the program rather than an afterthought. This is the foundation of managing your finances.

    Let's face it... if you just want to balance your checkbook, you can do that in a spreadsheet.

  • I was a moneydance user for a couple of years, and it worked well, but I was put off by the closed source and opaque file format.

    After a month of parallel testing, I switched on January 1 of this year to Jgnash [sourceforge.net].

    It is also a java program, so it will run on Windows or Linux (I use it on Linux with the Sun JDK). It can supposedly import GnuCash data but I haven't tried. The code is open, the file format is XML.

    Jgnash is not as mature as moneydance, and doesn't have all the features (yet), but it is sta

  • ...is it possible to do it in GnuCash or MoneyDance?

    I get paid a variable amount every week depending on how many hours I work. In order to plan ahead, I have Quicken automatically enter a number that's a conservative estimate of how much is going to come in every Friday for a few weeks in advance. But when that Friday is past and I hit "Download online transactions", it can't match up the estimated entry with the real entry, even though they have the exact same name, because the amounts are different.
  • by copponex (13876) on Friday April 25, 2003 @09:24AM (#5807950) Homepage
    First of all, let me preface this statement by the fact that I would do what I'm about to suggest, if I had any programming knowledge at all. I am reading books on XML and Java, but I know it will be months before I could start programming...

    If anyone in the linux community wants to make millions of dollars, they need to create an accounting package that is designed for small businesses, AND as easy to use as quickbooks, AND can support an high number of simultaneous users (50 or so). I've looked at NOLA, ARIA, Compiere, Lazy8, SQL Ledger, and a ton of others, but no one even comes close to the interface and ease of installation in QuickBooks. You could even create an entire linux distro around the package, since many *many* small businesses don't have sales people doing anything but selling, writing e-mails, and looking up phone numbers.

    The application can't be cobbled together between open source projects. It needs an integrated and have a consistent, intuitive interface. It needs to have in-depth reporting, with the ability to drill down inside the reports to locate specific information. It needs to have inventory control - in short, support for everything that the big boys do. And you don't have to even sell the program - just sell the support. This is, and has been, one of the biggest gaps in software that everyone knows about, but no one has tried to fix.

    • Um, the previous owner of MoneyDance, Appgen [appgen.com], has such a program. It's called MyBooks.

      $99 for a 5 user license. You can use it standalone on one machine, of course, but to get the most bang for your $99, you need to install the server version on a Linux box, and the clients on your choice of Linux, MacOSX, or Windows.

      I've been running it for a year, and it's been fantastic.

  • Look, i realize this may be completely off topic, but can I just say that there were a bunch of announcements yesterday around Win2k3, some of which are very interesting even to a Linux only crowd. The new TPC benchmarks, Ballmer saying that Windows is more innovative than Linux, the worldwide roll out and advertising campaign and so on. Yet nothing on slashdot was covered. TODAY they have a note about a personal cash management product release that very few people have ever even heard of! The tag line
  • by ek_adam (442283) on Friday April 25, 2003 @11:01AM (#5808738) Homepage

    I started using GnuCash a couple of weeks ago. I'm running it on a PowerMac G4 350MHz with Mac OS X 10.2.5. I used MoneyDance for about one year in 2001-2002. Then it was discontinued. With some annoying file corruption bugs unfixed and apparently unlikely to be fixed I switched back to Quicken. The current release happened after the original programmer finally got rights to the code he wrote for Appgen.

    Now that I have it compiled, I am happier with GnuCash than I was with MoneyDance. One big advantage of GnuCash over MoneyDance for someone leaving Quicken? GnuCash is very good with QIF imports. MoneyDance produces way too many duplicate entries after a QIF import.

    On the other hand, the lack of a GnuCash binary distribution for some platforms will push some people to MoneyDance. It took my computer over 12 hours to compile GnuCash and all of its dependencies. Loading MoneyDance took a minute or two.

  • I will not buy a product called "MoneyDance". It gives me visions of my life savings dancing into someone else's wallet. I will change my mind if it has a feature that will, say print money or automagically make my bank ballance increase.

    $G
  • Be sure to take a moment in the usual big-box stores and ask for MoneyDance. Build some demand for alternative software.
  • Perl Based Checkbook [fperkins.com]

    It's actually kinda basic, but it's all I wanted at the time. Try the demo [fperkins.com]

Never tell people how to do things. Tell them WHAT to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity. -- Gen. George S. Patton, Jr.

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