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Kazaa Continues to Evolve 280

Posted by Hemos
from the gotta-make-some-money dept.
Zephy writes "The New York Times (free registration etc.. ) has an article about a new partnership between Kazaa, and Tiscali, the European internet access provider. Seems that Kazaa will carry ads for Tiscali's broadband services in return for a cash 'bounty' when a user signs up for broadband. To quote the article, 'This gives legitimacy to KaZaA.' Also, Cnet has an article about the new Kazaa version which has features designed to help users avoid corrupt or wrong files such as those spread around p2p by the MP/RIAA."
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Kazaa Continues to Evolve

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  • Finally (Score:4, Funny)

    by batboy78 (255178) on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:05AM (#4311630) Homepage
    I like to have all of my pr0n named properly
    • Re:Finally (Score:3, Interesting)

      by gabec (538140)
      so what's to keep the MPAA from making a bunch of profiles and then going around marking legitim...err.. uh... appropriately named files... as fakes?
  • by Njoyda Sauce (211180) <jnjpepper&hotmail,com> on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:08AM (#4311653)
    How soon till the RIAA slams Kazaa as long and hard as Napster? Surely they don't think that joining forces with European companies somehow protects them from the long arm of the RIAA?
    • Why shouldn't RIAA stop them? If they would have done legal business instead of spreading illegal copies of copyrighted material I don't think that RIAA would stop them.

      Whine all you want, but it is justifying theft, one way or the other, to think that it is ok to have services such as Kazaa.

      I hate RIAA as much as the next guy, and I am not too happy about MPAA either, but then again, I am not happy about a lot of things really, but that doesn't make me some kind of moral superhero for the people...
      • I hate RIAA as much as the next guy, and I am not too happy about MPAA either, but then again, I am not happy about a lot of things really, but that doesn't make me some kind of moral superhero for the people...

        Not for "the people," no. But when you uncritically parrot the sentiments of our economic masters, who decree that one must never share one's music, then you become their hero. Or stooge, as it were.

        • by JoeRobe (207552)
          "...one must never share one's music..."

          Who's music? Your music? Music that you wrote and recorded?

          You may want to share music files, but don't be mistaken: it's *not* your music unless you're the artist that made it. If you buy the CD, then you own a little round piece of plastic, but you still don't own the music.

          • BULLSHIT IT IS MY MUSIC the INSTANT I PAY FOR IT.
            I can alter it, change the way I listen to it, edit it, time shift or media shift it in any fashion I want. What I can't do is provide it to others for free, or resell it. Beyond that it is my MUSIC, and if the RIAA thinks differently they are STUPID. I treat a CD I bought just like a book I bought.
            • It is your COPY of the ARTISTS MUSIC, for your own personal use, yes. You can edit a track on your CD to your heart's content, as long as it's for personal use. The minute you distribute this in any way, it infringes on the copyright (which you have stated). Just like you buying a book, you could write a different ending, but when you start to claim that it's yours/selling it, it doesn't really go over to well, now does it?

              I think you're not on the right topic-- The topic is regarding sharing files (ie. infringing on the copyright), not your rights concerning personal usage.

              • I see your point. This is not directly germane, but in an effort to ensure the Corporate right to profit, they are going to ensure I can't exercise my free use rights. I think the governemnt needs to tilt the field towards consumer free use and the burden of ensuring a secure system should rest on the producer NOT the consumer. The existing laws COVER this situation and should be exercised, we DON't need more legislation, the only ones who benefit that way is the lawyers.
            • Actually, "yours" is defined by the legal system, so, no, it isn't yours.

              You have the right to own and listen to your copy, though. You also have a few other specifically granted rights. But you do not hold the copyright on the music, which is the mark of ownership of that music.

              You do own the raw CD, and you could melt it and then do whatever you like with the raw materials...but you do not have ownership of the data that comes pre-recorded on the CD.
      • by SirSlud (67381) on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:45AM (#4311988) Homepage
        > Whine all you want, but it is justifying theft, one way or the other, to think that it is ok to have services such as Kazaa.

        We should shut down FedEx too. Last I heard, they had delivered lots of illegal things to sketchy people. Clearly we must ensure that people are on tigbht-fitting technological leashes so they don't have to think or act accountable for their actions. Welcome to utopia, where, if you can physically do it, it must be okay! Never think about the consequences of your individual actions again!

        Would you be the first to turn in your friends and family, or are the people that made the tools responsible for bending and warping their puny little minds into acts of wonton piracy?
        • by Bamfsog (535812) on Monday September 23, 2002 @01:00PM (#4312497) Homepage
          The difference between FedEx and the Kazaa/Napster networks is that the MAJORITY of the file sharing network's content is a problem. Their primary business and attraction to end users is the illegal content.

          There was an article in the news the other day about a guy selling weed at KFC, and slipping it into the orders. The majority of the business being done was still tasty chicken, so KFC wasn't the problem. If they had removed 90% of their menu and replaced it with Weed, then they would be shutdown.

        • by Planesdragon (210349) <slashdot&castlesteelstone,us> on Monday September 23, 2002 @01:13PM (#4312602) Homepage Journal
          1: It's "wanton", not "wonton."

          2: FedEx and other true "Common Carriers" have no way to tell that the contents of one wrapped package are illegal--and if they do (i.e., it's got a "do not export" label on the outside and is being shipped to Iraq), they've probably allready been sued to stop & check.

          VCR recorders were declared legal because a significant legal use was declared--and then followed through on. What's the significant legal use of KaZaa, again?
          • by SirSlud (67381)
            > What's the significant legal use of KaZaa, again?

            Until it is shown that most people pirate content that they either already own, have owned, or purchase legally in the future, there's not much one can say to that. This would really be the "smoking gun" - getting a statistic that really spells out what percentage of KaZaa downloads are listened too "illegaly" (in that once its listened too, the listener should either own the song , purchase it in the future, or decide s/he doesnt like the song and never listen to it again). I really have my suspicions that the number is not nearly as high as the RIAA is trying to spin it to.

            I don't have much sympathy for the RIAA tho. Yes, the rules are in their favour, but they are really abusing the system to stymie any possibility of competitors in the online music distribution industry. Its an industry that should already exist, but the RIAA's tactics just delay the maturation of the industry for us consumers.

            All of this belies this simple fact, a fact that many others here have echoed: were it not for Napster, the RIAA would have *less* money in its pockets thanks to the music I discovered that I wanted to buy. It's as simple as that.
            • Until it is shown that most people pirate content that they either already own, have owned or purchase legally in the future....

              Riiight.

              Also, purchasing in the future does not make pirating the song legal. It also makes sense not to have that make it legal -- to some degree, you decrease the value of the song by listening to it, since the best time is the first time. Also, the artist/company does not have your money in the meantime, and cannot be using the money to produce more goods or earn interest.

              It doesn't matter what you're doing is even in the RIAA or even artists' best interests -- it's still illegal.

              Now, whether you're concerned over whether what you do is a crime is your own concern...
              • Re:Piracy? (Score:3, Insightful)

                by SirSlud (67381)
                > to some degree, you decrease the value of the song by listening to it, since the best time is the first time

                Many songs take _more_ than one listening in order for you to appreciate the value (in fact, most, unless you're really lacking in any appreciation for music.)

                What you're proposing is perposterous. By your logic, we should prevent friends from hearing the album we just bought because they should buy it themselves. Think about what you're saying. Do you really owe studios a buck when you watch a movie at a friends house? You've just decreased the value of the product! No .. because labels know that if your friend likes it, they'll buy it themselves.

                You sound like the reason you buy a CD is to listen to a song once. The poor pop music industry sure makes it feel that way, doesn't it? People forget that you buy albums because you want to hear the song many times. If you listen to something once, what you want is the radio to play it, or to go over to your friends house to hear it (uhoh, call the police!)

                You have to be kidding me that you really consider that when you go over to a friends house to check out a new album, you're decreasing the value of the product. I suppose that should be illegal too?
          • What's the significant legal use of KaZaa, again?

            1. Porn. Lots of it. All you can ever want. Much of it put there by the people who own it to promote their websites.

            2. mp3s that you legally own. I dunno about you, but I am picky about what I listen to. I own the CD to just about every song that I possess in mp3 format. (bootlegs not withstanding) I just like them in a portable, network-transportable format. Many people such as myself do the same.

            3. Distribution of free and open source software. Can't get into Redhat's FTP site? None of the mirrors giving you a good connection? Pull the ISO off of Kazaa.

            Yes, there is a hotbed of illegal activity there, but there's just as much legal activity. Just like Vegas. (but without so many hookers.)

        • Would you be the first to turn in your friends and family, or are the people that made the tools responsible for bending and warping their puny little minds into acts of wonton piracy?

          Arrr, me eye spots another trade ship from the orient! Ready the cannons, and pull hard to starboard! Wonton soup for everyone who lives through it boys, and if luck be with us, we'll score some crab rangoons and general tso's chicken!
    • by NineNine (235196)
      What I'm wondering, and I've asked this before, is is there any way for the RIAA to "shut down" Fasttrack? Is Fasttrack as distributed as they say it is? If there were servers for the RIAA to attempt to shut down, is it enough to shut down all of the Fasttrack network?
      • ...is there any way for the RIAA to "shut down" Fasttrack?

        Fasttrack is proprietary, so any guess may be correct. However, they do describe their network as formed from regular nodes and 'supernodes' that act as directory services for the regular nodes. Registration is used to find the initial supernode(s), but after that it is p2p (and supernodes can appear/disappear).

        So, perhaps you could shut it down by demanding kazaa tells you about all the supernodes it knows about, and following the links. That will not get everyone, since links are transitory by nature in p2p, and so being exhaustive would be impossible. Alternatively, you could demand kazaa release all the registrant names, and use those as a starting point. But not everyone will have registered (you can find your way onto the network without registering), not everyone will have been entirely truthful when they did register (credit cards will help, but not guarantee), and besides that's a lot more work.

        Alternatively, you could force ISPs to filter out Kazaa traffic. This works poorly; ISPs will not filter their traffic for just anyone (and there are costs/tradeoffs involved), and people would just hide the traffic some other way anyway.

        So, there is no 100% way in a technical sense. Of course there are lots of imperfect solutions, and there may be a balanced level of enforcement that would keep it out of the mainstream---the answer could be yes in a pragmatic sense.
      • Yes. The network was not originally based around a single central point of failure, but in an effort to make money, the Kazaa people added a centralized authentication system in. If this point is shut down, the entire network goes down.
  • Observation (Score:4, Insightful)

    by poot_rootbeer (188613) on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:08AM (#4311659)

    'This gives legitimacy to KaZaA' means the same things as 'This paints a big bulls-eye on KaZaA's back for Rosen & Valenti to shoot at.'

  • by BoomerSooner (308737) on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:09AM (#4311667) Homepage Journal
    The line is what? "Sign up for broadband and you can steal even more music online!"

    Sounds legit to me. (end sarcasm)
  • by tuxedo-steve (33545) on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:09AM (#4311669)
    To quote the article, 'This gives legitimacy to KaZaA.'
    Yes, and to quote the KaZaA CEO:
    "Arrr, me harties! This be giving us legitimacy! We sail for New Orleans, with our bounty of broadband gold and pirrrrated MP3s!"
    Just because you're the King of Spain's privateering vessel doesn't mean you don't have a peg-leg and a parrot. Get me?
  • Don't download it! (Score:4, Informative)

    by Mr_Silver (213637) on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:09AM (#4311670)
    Obvious point for some, but still I'll make it.

    Wait until Kazaa Lite is released before you go downloading it. Unfortunately www.kazaalite.com doesn't work any more but doa2.host.sk [doa2.host.sk] (which is where www.k-lite.tk points to) does.

    At the moment they only have 1.7.2 up there, but give them a chance and check back next week.

    • Well, Kazaalite.com is hurting, but luckily, you can get Kazaalite on Kazaa! I get quite a few people downloading my copy Kazaalite with either grokster or Kazaa.
    • Wait until Kazaa Lite is released before you go downloading it. Unfortunately www.kazaalite.com doesn't work any more but doa2.host.sk [doa2.host.sk] (which is where www.k-lite.tk points to) does.

      It's there. Here's the link [doa2.host.sk]
      (note: I hope they survive the slashdotting)

  • wow (Score:3, Interesting)

    by laserjet (170008) on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:09AM (#4311675) Homepage
    Here's the main gist of the article, boiled down into a single rock:

    "Under the deal, KaZaA's owner, Sharman Networks Ltd., will advertise high-speed Internet access provided by Tiscali, an Italian Internet provider, to its tens of millions of European users. In return Tiscali, which serves around seven million customers in 15 countries, will pay Sharman a "bounty" for each KaZaA user who signs up for its high-speed access service."

    Seems like an OK move for both companies, but I think there are so few people that actually look at and consider banner ads that it won't do much good. On the plus side, Kazaa gets another partner.

    It does seem a bit funny that a high speed ISP would partner up with a file-sharing company that eats up all their bandwidth. While some ISPs are figuring out how to ban them, others are joining with them. I hope they have a lot of bandwidth to spare.
    • by amorsen (7485)
      It does seem a bit funny that a high speed ISP would partner up with a file-sharing company that eats up all their bandwidth. While some ISPs are figuring out how to ban them, others are joining with them. I hope they have a lot of bandwidth to spare.

      File sharing is just about the only way they can sell high-speed connections. There are practically no content providers for high-bandwidth content. It is nice to have web pages download slightly faster, but for most users the difference is not worth the extra cost. Personally I went for ADSL because the alternative around here is to pay by the minute. I want to be on always, the bandwidth is secondary.

      Tiscali is one of the nicer ISP's, at least here in Denmark. They do not mind sharing of connections or running servers.

      Incidentally, I find it sad that we are calling ADSL high-speed.

  • Self Moderation (Score:2, Insightful)

    by QEDog (610238)
    "Kazaa's new software allows people to rate files so that corrupt or false files will quickly collect ratings poor enough to warn people away from downloading them. "

    I wonder how long till this system is also exploited to give poor ratings to the real files. Maybe some other alternatives to self moderation [slashdot.org] can be used.

  • by Corvaith (538529) on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:09AM (#4311678) Homepage
    The one time I tried Kazaa, I didn't drop it because of the ads or any of that junk. I don't like it, but that's life. I dropped it, in the end, because every time I tried to download /anything/, it seemed like, the labels were wrong. The filename said one thing, the label said something else, and the thing itself was usually some third thing. I don't /think/ that the MP/RIAA has been masking Eminem as the Indigo Girls claiming to be Ani Difranco, but... I suppose I could be wrong.
    • Yeh, I love how someone will download something, think it's someone different than it is and rename the file before sharing it again, paying no attention to the id3 tags.. Doesn't every use winamp? I'm amazed at how often I'll get mp3's which are labeled wrong, but have the correct id3 info because the person who originally ripped them used a service such as cddb.
    • Well, the great thing about Kazaa is it's viral. If you get a song that's wrong, you can either nuke it, meaning there will be fewer bad copies out there, or you can rename it yourself, and that copy will propgate faster than bogus copies.
    • The new Kazaa version attempts to address these exact issues. They will even reward the users that rate the content with priority when downloading.

      Now go away, you over-moderated troll!
  • Rating System (Score:5, Insightful)

    by SealBeater (143912) on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:12AM (#4311692) Homepage
    Quick question on the rating system. What's to stop the same people who are
    saturating KaZaa with false files to simply rate good files negatively? That
    way, they don't even have to flood the network, all they have to do is stomp on
    a file at a time and nobody is going to download it to see if it's good or not.
    Is the rating system simply going to make it easier for companies to steer
    people away from good files?

    SealBeater
    • Re:Rating System (Score:2, Interesting)

      by hey (83763)
      The MPAA proxies would be outvoted millions
      to one. Since there are millions of Kazaa users.
      It would be hard for the MPAA proxies to simulate
      being millions of users.
      • "The MPAA proxies would be outvoted millions to one. Since there are millions of Kazaa users."

        That's just flat-out poor logic.

        For any given file, only a small percentage of the total Kazaa users will download it. Of those who download it, even fewer will rate it. There won't be millions of votes for any song on Kazaa unless someone rigs up an automated voting script.

        • Except that the real ones will be getting the positive votes. Slowly, they will begin to pull ahead of the pack, and thus gain more attention - and a similar increase in getting good votes, until there's a clear authoritative "Fooblah Slim - Grok my Parser Up.mp3".
    • I agree. It seems pretty flawed. I'm sure the theory is the number of users rating it will overcome the RIAA's attempt to mark it bad. But, what if the RIAA is the first one to mark it bad? And what if they register 1000s of accounts? It seems to me the answer to this file trust problem is to assign a modified web of trust [rubin.ch] to people using PGP/GPG keys. Maybe someone will implement it in giFT [sf.net]...

      Ian
  • by Frater 219 (1455) on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:12AM (#4311699) Journal
    Perhaps this will cut down on the number of port-21 scans I see from Tiscali. At present, they're one of the largest sources of scans for open anonymous FTP servers, right behind Wanadoo. The abusers are looking for FTP servers that allow both upload and download in the same directory. When they find them, they fill them up with warez, porn, and movies.

    Now, you may think, hey, free warez, porn, and movies ... but I'll bet you don't work for a site with a few hundred technically bright but security-dumb scientists. These folks like open FTP because it makes it easy to collaborate and share data, but they don't like having their disks fill up with blowjob MPEGs.

    So if Tiscali can get its warezers and pr0nsters running Kazaa and shoving spyware onto each other's systems all day, maybe they will go away and leave my users' port 21 alone.

    • This should really piss off the pr0nsters:

      dd if=/dev/urandom of=/home/ftp/pub/blowjob.mpg bs=1024 count=100000

      HH
  • by Suppafly (179830) <slashdot@@@suppafly...net> on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:14AM (#4311727)
    As someone who has to do network support, nothing is worse than a computer which has had kazaa and the accompaning spyware installed. That new.net crap ruins the winsock stuff forcing a total reinstall, and those spyware proxys have people complaining about QoS when its the proxy which is providing the crappy service. I await the day we come to /. to bury kazaa, not to praise it.
    • Cleaning up KaZaa ruined machines makes me a decent part time living! :-)

      I'd be out of business if it weren't for KaZaa and WebShots... (well, not really, but I'd be out of _easy_ jobs).

      Don't worry, I always tell my users not to use these programs after I've cleaned up their messes.
      • I don't think it's quite fair to compare Webshots and Kazaa. Webshots may interfere with the operation of your computer in some circumstances, but no more than any other app that runs in the background like that. Webshots is not engineered to mess with your computer and it can be easily disabled. Granted, many users may bog down their systems with it, but it's a trade off between features and responsiveness that one can consciously make. Kazaa is an entirely different animal.
    • "I await the day we come to /. to bury kazaa, not to praise it"

      I'm just curious if you would consider my software Andromeda [turnstyle.com] more friendly for your network. It's not like the main P2P networks insofar as you can't really use it as a mass anonymous downloader.

      However, you can use it to stream your collection over a local network and/or over the Internet. Basically, it bulds a complete streaming web site from a collection of MP3 files. PHP and ASP versions are available.

      There's no spyware, it doesn't need to talk 'outside' of your network, and it transfers over http so there typically aren't firewall hassles.

      Best, -Scott

  • by Scarblac (122480) <slashdot@gerlich.nl> on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:18AM (#4311762) Homepage

    There are several interesting developments here. For one thing, Tiscali allies with Kazaa - a natural step for them, because after all, they want to sell bandwidth, and why would people need a lot of bandwidth, if there weren't any applications like Kazaa?

    Then in the second article, one of the things that's mentioned is that they partner with a music company for which Kazaa is actually the only way it distributes its music. This may be good for Kazaa's legal case, after all Napster seemed to lose mostly because they couldn't show that their networks were used legitimately at all.

    On the other hand, I wonder what the judge will think of the new feature against 'bogus music and video files', that are inserted by the record companies to make the network useless. Almost all of those files will make themselves look like songs that are actually illegal to trade, so making a feature to stop them, however useful and natural to make, could be seen as actively helping to download copyrighted stuff.

    But I can't really see them winning the case in the US anyway, after Napster.

    • Almost all of those files will make themselves look like songs that are actually illegal to trade, so making a feature to stop them, however useful and natural to make, could be seen as actively helping to download copyrighted stuff.

      Not at all. The WYSIWYG feature merely make sure that the user is in fact downloading what they think they are downloading. That would also prevent a ten-year-old from downloading the "Donald Duck gets a blowjob" mp3 when he/she in fact was looking for Britney Spears.
    • Then in the second article, one of the things that's mentioned is that they partner with a music company for which Kazaa is actually the only way it distributes its music. This may be good for Kazaa's legal case, after all Napster seemed to lose mostly because they couldn't show that their networks were used legitimately at all.

      The problem is there are much better ways to distribute legal stuff than Kazaa. A rootless peer to peer setup involves enormous networking overhead (over 1/2 the packets) that you wouldn't have with the standard download systems. I think almost all anonymous peer-to-peer file shares are going to face this problem; if what was being distributed was legal you wouldn't go to this much trouble.

      I think the best thing for Kazaa would be to get political stuff of an extremely non mainstream nature: everything from KKK literature to communist party literature to anarchist stuff to taliban philosophy to Turner diaries traffic to taiwanese indepence writings ... That way there is a good reason to be doing in anonymously and at the same time its highly protected. The downside is you might end up attracting enemies more powerful than the MPAA and RIAA.
  • Spam I report often originates from Tiscali accounts. I wouldnt give them any of my money for that reason.
  • ...but if Kazaa evolves to be radioactive and fire-breathing, I'm leaving the island.
  • by vidnet (580068) on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:21AM (#4311788) Homepage
    Most ISPs seems to want to block or limit throughput for heavy traffic apps like this. What exactly is Tiscali trying to do?

    Are they trying to round up all the kiddies on their network, driving bandwidth costs down?

    • by SirSlud (67381) on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:29AM (#4311853) Homepage
      Maybe Tiscali recognizes that if Kazaa has been downloaded 120 million times, there can't be that many Kazaa users that are full blown warez kiddies.

      Most of the people I know who p2p (I don't out of sheer laziness, but then again, I've stopped buying music due to the crappiness of product right now) were not bandwidth guzzling warez monkeys but just wanted a recording of a top 40 song that they could have taped off the radio twice an hour anyhow.

      So maybe Tiscali sees p2p as broadband's killer app, and has taken a more objective analysis of how their bandwidth will be affect by this partnership rather than just assuming that they'll only attract the types who throttle the pipe.
      • Here's my Quality Assurance procedure when I buy new records:

        1. Browse the reviews for stuff that looks interesting.
        2. Jump online and find samplers
        3. If samplers are good after about three listens, buy the disc.

        I've avoided quite a few downers by following this procedure.
  • First impressions (Score:4, Insightful)

    by EpsCylonB (307640) <eps@nospAM.epscylonb.com> on Monday September 23, 2002 @11:26AM (#4311817) Homepage
    they are promoting bands and videos on the search page but to play them you need to update your DRM software.

    seems to me that kazaa could be trying to set it's self up as a media delivery system when palladium and all the copyright protection is implemented.
  • KaZaa is the biggest piece of shite ever. It shouldn't even warrant this fluff post on /. . Spyware. DNS hijacking. It completely fucked up our DynDNS system with CommonName.
  • Legitimacy? (Score:2, Insightful)

    Woohoo, Kazaa joined an affiliate program. Does that that give my favorite pr0n site legitimacy too?
  • Does anyone else get 99% of their dl requests stonewalled with "more sources needed"? Reminds me of all the failed transfers I had with napster, yet no problems getting mega-rare tracks from AudioGalaxy.

    I was hoping with less and less P2P services, people would flock to a common one, hence boosting the available tracks out there.
  • It's a shame that JaJa [csc.com] is associated with Tiscali.

  • I can't wait for the first time I can't Meta-Moderate because we've been Googled!

    By the way, does anyone know if this will solve the slashdot-effect-site-caching issue?

  • ... Kazaa will carry ads for Tiscali's broadband services in return for a cash 'bounty' ...

    Kazaa users are often called pirates, right? In that case, I think they mean booty.

    Arr!
  • I can't wait for the new legitimacy testing. I am sick and tired of the stupid porn baitbus ad which, by the way has virus encoded in its format every single time I download porn. These assholes just add some extra garbage bits to change the size and then they change the name. Its still the same old file advertising their porn and opening up a million websites at once and uploading the litmus worm on my system. I updated my system so the virus won't execute but I want to get a gun and shoot those motherf*ckers. Litterally %70 of the porn out their is from 1 of their 3 ads! I bet they have a bot that changes keeps remaining the original video file and storing and hoping suckers download it and spread it some more.



    Another obnixous one is abunch of stupid kids singing to a midi file playing and they disguise their mp3's with names like Metallica-for-whomthebell-tools or Nirvanna-come-as-you-are-accoustic-rare.

    What is wrong with these downloaders? If you guys get burned, please do us all a favor and just delete the bad movie and mp3 files?

  • by Jacek Poplawski (223457) on Monday September 23, 2002 @02:03PM (#4312971)

    I think Kazaa will die like Napster or AudioGalaxy did. Don't use Kazaa. Please try edonkey2000 network. It's free, it's available not only for Windows, and you don't need to watch any commercials.

    official (closed source) client: edonkey2000 [edonkey2000.com]
    free (GPL) client: mldonkey [nongnu.org]
    free, Windows-only client: emule [sourceforge.net]
    ShareReactor community: ShareReactor [sharereactor.com]
  • ...it evolves into an OS X version?

    Please?

    (There is a serious lack of P2P software on OS X, all help is appreciated)

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