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Intel

Intel's Tualatin P3 118

Posted by timothy
from the what-happens-when-ndas-expire dept.
DavoKid writes: "Intel rolls out the .13 micron Pentium III processor based on the Tualatin core at 1.2GHz. This chip really shines and overclocks to 1.47GHz. The benchmarks are fairly impressive too! Reviews at: HotHardware, Anandtech, and Tech Report." Also given plenty of attention is Intel's new D815EEA2 motherboard, since that appears to be about the only choice for the new chip. The consensus seems to be that this chip is at least intended to be "the new Celeron," but marketed also as a power-frugal chip to impress server-farms with electrical savings.
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Intel's Tualatin P3

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  • by Anonymous Coward
    I just tooke a long hard look at the HUGE heatsink that runs up the middle of my G4 Cube. I also noticed that this particular heatsink did not have a fan glued to it.

    Oh, and if you want hard numbers, go read up the distributed.net stats. Granted, they are a mathmatically narrow way of looking at it, but they certainly show how low MHz PPC chips do very will against high MHz x86 chips.

    Also, congratulations on your purchase of a Dell computer. You get what you pay for.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Don't worry, just give Windows a few more iterations and it'll require a 10GHz chip.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Scientific computer modeling. Now it takes 10-15 hours to complete a single run of my model on a R14k (SGI) or an Athlon 1.33 (Linux) based machine. With a faster cpu, I could collect more data in less time (obviously). If it was 10x faster, I could complete a run over lunch! There are some applications which will always need more speed.

    -M

  • by Anonymous Coward
    Intel names their processors after rivers. The ones designed in the Hillsboro, Oregon facility are named after Oregon Rivers; Hence McKenzie, Willamette, and Tualitin. Too-All-i-tin. Ironically, the Tualitin is known as a particularly slow river.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 30, 2001 @07:21AM (#2183412)
    #!/usr/bin/perl -w

    use strict;

    my @a = ('Pen', 'Cel', 'Vag', 'Ner', 'Tua', 'Fel');
    my @b = ('ti', 'ta', 'uni', 'lat', 'ino', 'tro', 'tra');
    my @c = ('um', 'in', 'an', 'on', 'am', 'im', 'io');

    print $a[rand($#a)].$b[rand($#b)].$c[rand($#c)]."\n";
  • The other day, I noticed that Dell had started offering a 1.1GHz PIII option on their Precision 4100. Is this one of the Tualatins?

    (BTW, my box at home is still a 550 MHz PIII Katmai, the last one produced on 0.25 micron. I have major process-shrink envy.)
  • Crap... I've been referring to it as the 'Guffaw'. No wonder my Mac-loving friends have been so snippy lately.
  • I always assumed higher clockspeeds would eventually give way to lower power and slower speeds in future chips. First to go was SMP. Now it's clockspeed.

    Obviously at 1.2 Ghz Intel has stepped back from the speed deamon days of 1.4Ghz P4's and started retooling for lower power consumption and portability. Those of us who want to crunch numbers will have to spend big bucks for mainframish chips with weird names and companies with 3 letter names.

  • what's your favorite CPU-intensive activity?
    (with all due respect to raster and mandrake)
    enlightenment and gtk+ pixmap themes....
  • Vector graphics for 32bit-600dpi colour displays, fewer compromises in voice recognition, some of those cumbersome comp-sci alorithms to deal with stuff like process starvation, richer GUI programming environments, condensing server clusters into single machines, real-time dvd-quality video compression, games games and more games...

    Most importantly perhaps for the short term, lower energy comsumption in Notebooks, fanless silent desktops, stuff like that.

    Finally it can be used for the ultimate user interface... specialized devices which are cheap, disposable, portable and secure. The high end of technology pulls the low end with it.

  • by Sethb (9355)
    Since when does a sugarpill induce vomiting, nausea, headaches in 0.0001% of patients studied?

    Having both a degree in Psychology, and working in an IT job, I'd bet that it's more like 1% of patients reporting a lot of this stuff. My grandmother swore that Sudafed made her drowsy, never mind that it's a stimulant. People always like to blame their meds for causing some problem with them. They'll report that the test drug caused diahhrea, and forget to mention that they ate four pounds of greasy Mexican food the night before.

    Kind of like the users who swear that installing the latest version of Netscape caused their printer to break.

    In short, you'd be surprised at the large large number of people who don't or can't grasp the concept that correlation doesn't equal causation.
    ---
  • Tualatin is named after a river in Oregon.
  • Every word in that sentence is merely a gross misspelling of the word tomato.
  • I find it funny how intel marketting and pr driods can say the names for their processors and keep a straight face. Also the amazing creativity in naming their processors once released is astounding. At this point if Intel released a processor that wasn't named **pentium**** people would probably think it was made by AMD.
  • I have a feeling that the G4 at 1.2 Ghz would be putting out more than 21W.
  • The Tualatin, just like the Willamette, and the Columbia, and the Deschutes, and some more I can't think of, are in fact, rivers.

    The clever practice of naming chips after rivers has been revealed by someone who's fallen into the Tualatin River and survived without mutation.

    And it's pronounced 'too-wall-ah-tin'. There's a city [tualatin.or.us]. With a crawfish festival [tualatincrawfish.com].

  • MHz != real life speed

    The 750MHz PPC is much faster than a Pentium III at 750MHz. As far as I know the 750MHz PPC is about equal to ~ 1.1GHz PIII in most operations.

    There is of course faster x86s than PIII-1.1GHz, but it is definitly not the slowest x86.
  • Actually, the names for recent Intel chips are from locations within a short trip on Tri-Met [tri-met.org] or a short drive from thier Hillsboro, OR facilities, where they do pretty close to everything.

    Tualitin is the name of the plains Hillsboro sits on, as well as a city south of Portland.

    Williamette is the name of the river running through Portland, as well as the region overall (Williamette Valley).

    More likely, Intel will name new stuff things like Boring, Portland, Forest Grove, Tigard, Beaverton, Columbia, Hood, or other locale names...

    --
    Vote Socialist [votesocialist.org] or quit whining!

  • two-AH-lah-tin

    It's a river in Oregon.
  • Apple's really pushing the whole 'megahertz myth' concept as a way to reassure Mac buyers that an 800Mhz G4 is just as good as these 1.xGhz monsters from AMD/Intel. They had the full dog-and-pony-show including animated slides at MacWorld a couple of weeks back.

    What's the consensus around here about such things? I get the impression that the AMD/Intel competition keeps the x86 arch on the cheaper end that PPC for obvious reasons.

    It's kind of annoying that it is hard to know what to trust and how to benchmark different chips. Overall, the CPU only makes up a portion of the package when you buy a PC (RAM, HDD, Optical disk, video, etc being others), but it has traditionally had mindshare of being important beyond such other things. And people tend to only look at clockspeed.

    What's the best way to compare these things?
    ----------------------------
  • by ikekrull (59661) on Monday July 30, 2001 @05:12PM (#2183429) Homepage
    Sure, but with a mass-produced hardware encoder you could do the same with a 100Mhz part.

    Consider how much slower a general-purpose CPU like the P3 is compared to custom hardware like the NVidia GeForce3 for doing realtime 3D. You probably would neet a 10GHz or better P3 to equal the performance of the GeForce3 at this task.

    With the increasing popularity of video-processing on consumer desktops, it would be nice to see hardware manufacturers putting some hardware into their cards to support encoding functionality, as well as just augmenting software decoding.

    Realtime MPEG-4 encoding is not out of the question, since realtime MPEG-2 encoding is now a consumer-level proposition - TiVO, cards from hauppage etc..

    It would be interesting to see Matrox take back some market share by building a programmable video compression engine onto one of it's upcoming cards.

    They have tried this with the 'Rainbow Runner' and it's ilk, but these products were never billed as a 'Complete PVR and DVD-ripping station', which i'm sure would be vastly more attractive to joe average than 'Record and edit your own home videos'

    This is not to say that a 10GHz CPU would not be nifty, but rather you could get more done with a set of lower-clocked chips, each optimised for specific functions.

  • Damn. I hope these ones won't be as buggy as the 810/815. I've tried a few ones, and all I got was random halts on my penguin OS....

    BTW I would like to know if any of you ran memtest86 [memtest86.com] on i810/815 boards... I did on several ones and I got some pretty nice errors... so I fall back to my oldie PII. At least this one works 7/24.

    Álvaro Lopes
  • Indeed this looks like an Intel something...
  • How is this flamebait? Seems like quite a good summery of the respective respectibilities of the two companies!
  • Actually, you won't see many procs still selling that are slower than a 1.1 GHz PIII. The minimum specs for a $1000 machine are 1GHz Athlon (significantly faster than the 1.1GHz PIII for most things). And this is at CompUSA, which overcharges like hell. If you compare Gateway's comps to Apple's comps, you'll find that you get a much faster CPU (1.4 GHz Athlon vs 733 Mhz G4, for example), about double the RAM, a significantly better graphics card (Radeon 64MB vs GeForce MX, for example) and similar support and warrenties. At the high end, the $3500 (does't appear to include monitor) that you have to shell out for a basic dual G4 800 is easily enough to build a dual Athlon 1.2 GHz machine with tons of RAM, IDE RAID, GeForce3 graphics, and Klipsch 4.1 speakers. Face it, Apple's computers may be good in many ways, but they are underperforms that are overpriced.

  • Actually, NVIDIA has been consistantly making quality hardware for years now. Just as you don't expect a reliable company like Intel to produce buggy chipsets, you don't expect NVIDIA to produce buggy products either. It sometimes does happen (Pentium FDIV and i820) but not often enough to get cynical about.
  • Really? Empirically, NVIDIA's graphics drivers are the best out there, quality-wise. They've never frozen on my machine (the GF2/3s might be different) and they have by far the best OpenGL support of any consumer cards.
  • Linux or Windows 2000? Because there are SMP problems on Linux, but I haven't heard of any on Windows.
  • Yep! And I'm still wondering why the school decided to upgrade the 486 machines in my lab to PIII 800's (the data streams in at one rate and the IBM Aptiva's handled it perfectly).. It all comes down to Marketing! If you're going to show off the lab to perspective students, you need new hardware.. Dumb!

  • Intel isn't the only guys to have motherboards out for this chip, currently Asus has the TUSL2 and I believe that Abit is putting out a motherboard shortly.
  • The best method in comparing these things is to take the applications you're going to be running, and run them on the different machines. It won't show a comparison between processors, but systems as a whole. Then you can decide which machine runs fast enough for you at the price you want. Benchmarks and the math involved rarely shows a true advantage in all cases. One set of benchmarks might tell you that such-and-such a pocessor is faster becase of its floating point scores, while another might use formulas to showcase particular features of another processor. There are simply too many variables that go into "speed".

  • Intel bases all of its codenames on physical features of the Northwest -- I believe that processors are mountain-related, such as Foster, McKinley, Cascades, etc., but I've seen this turn into a flame war, so I will concede that I could be wrong about feature it is.

    In most cases the codename for something turns out to be better than the name they actually come up with, but I make an exception for Tualatin, except in dual processor configuration when they become "duallie Tuallies". Coppermine-T shall be the proper way to accurately refer to this core.

    I suppose "Pentium" is fine so long as you're used to the notion of goofy names like Tualatin, Horseheads, Owatonna, or just about any city in Pennsylvania, but for the rest of us, Pentium still sucks as a name. The only processor name I've really liked is Xeon. I think it was a dumb idea to start naming processors like Korean subcompacts instead of European sports cars.

    --

  • Good question. I would assume it would have to be, but it is not clear from Dell's website. They are advertising the new mobile 1.13 P-III's here [dell.com]. But here [dell.com] you have a Dell Dimension 4100 with either a P-III at 1.0 GHz or 1.1 GHz (add $40) and there is no additional explaination. The only P-III's that exist right now above 1.0GHz are the new Tualatins so that must be it.
  • How do you pronounce this? Tualatin? Towel a Tin?
    Intel is getting ridiculous. At least i can pronounce my processor. Power PC G4 "GEEE FOUR" Easy =)
  • The result is that the new CPU compares poorly to the Athlon CPU, which processes three FPU instructions per CPU cycle compared one instruction per CPU cycle on PIII's.

    P4 also only does 2 FP ops/second but outperforms K7 by about 50% on SPECfp. FP performance typically has more to do with memory bandwidth than with the speed of the FP unit.

  • At least i can pronounce my processor. Power PC G4

    Thanks! I could not tell if that was "guh-four" or "giga four".

    Have you seen my Omega Hadron?

  • I'm so embarrassed..

    It's better than having a "chip" on your shoulder.

  • does anyone else read that article the first time and see 12ghz? its obviously a simple typo and easily forgivable but I damn near crapped my pants before reality caught up with me.
  • i compiled xfree4 yesterday - 10 hours (and it didn't work :( on my p133 laptop.

    a 10Ghz cpu would really help voice & handwriting recognition.

    besides other intensive apps like compiling, editing video (more in demand than you might think) faster processors mean you can revise your approach to your problems.

    Remember when OS's and a lot of apps (such as Windows 3) were written mainly in assembler?

    As machines get faster we are able to increase the complexity of the systems we use. As usual it is a double edged sword. There does come a time when we should throw out all of our slow cpu based software and start again. The free unixes are fabulous and I use them every day but I also want them to die. I'm a plan9 user and fan (I had to mention it in somewhere :)

    It does amuse me, however, that I use faster and faster computers financed mostly by editing plain text with vi :)


    .oO0Oo.
  • At some point the die size is gonna stop shrinking and we are going to have to start going multi processor. Any guesses on when this will start happening?
  • Since when does a sugarpill induce vomiting, nausea, headaches in 0.0001% of patients studied?

    An unfortunate thing is, that due to (too?) strict FDA regulations, _all_ side effects, no matter how dubious they appear, have to be included in reports. So, having just one hypocondriac (or however it's spelled) might get your medicine a nice little list of side effects... :-)

    I'm sure it is intended to make sure that pharmaceutical companies won't try to sweep valid side effect reports under the carpet, but the downside is the long list of horrible side-effects, yes, even for sugar pills. Kind of like reverse placebo effect?
    --

  • This should be obvious, but if you don't need high FP (no, not first Post) performance, the chip might do well enough. Most servers (web, db) have little use for floating point arithmetics (AFAIK); many applications don't really depend on fast FPU (including spreadsheets as well as word processors), non-3D games. And 3D gfx cards give lessen FP calculation load, even though CPUs still need to do some of the calculations.

    It would be kind of interesting to see some estimations on current mix of assembly instructions by category, for "typical set of applications" (defined in some reasonably sane sense). Wouldn't be too surprised if dudes at Intel had used such estimations on deciding to use an outdated FPU, actually.
    --

  • "Athlon T-bird become the value market chip once Athlon 4's hit the streets?"

    I'm just making an educated guess here, but I would strongly suspect that any 'Duron 4' would be a reduced cache version of the Athlon 4, just as the Celeron and Duron were cache-inhibited versions of their siblings. As well as this, I'm sure AMD want to maximise the number of chips with their new instructions on as well; the enhanced performance of Athlon 4, just like the Pentium 4 relies to some extent on those new features being exploited.
  • is called namebrand. Big money has been payed so that people will recognize the name "pentium". So who can blame them for sticking with it.

    beats the Athlon4 the old athlon wasn't called the athlon3 (I know it was the third evolution of that chip, so what). Which is blatantly trying to have the same name as the P4.

  • Anyone remember this argument back at 400Mhz?

    I do.

  • Your right, and I hate it

    We saw the same thing with the celery FSB clock speed.

    Intel is always extremely conserned with it's lowend processors competing with its top of the line. Check out the Tom's Hardware review about 2 months ago when they got their hands on a high power Tulatin. Those marketing fools just figured they could kill 2 birds with 1 stone by lowering power (which hurts performance) and calling it "mobile" or "low power".

  • Why do you think there is so much discussion about which processors are best.

    The only thing you can do, is try and look at a variety of benchmarks, that put the chips on equal playing ground.

    Make sure benchmarks or apps have optimized code for the processor they are running on, and make sure the setup is the same for both processors.

    Much of the code that runs on the P4 isn't optimized for it, the optimized stuff runs much faster. Apple's G4 can perform really well on certain benchmarks but they never show the ones that suffer.

    Anyway it is a difficult process to say the least. Thats why Tom writes entire articles comparing chips for a living.

  • When someone created a "red-alert" type game in our assembly class. Real-time war, lots of units on the screen, 100 or so. The new p3 - 900mhz processors in the lab handled it no problem, however it might have crashed or run really slowly on an old 486. But anyway your right, and the argument still stands. Gaming is about the only thing that might require speed.
  • Itanium uses a different language, EPIC, which stands for Explicitly Parallel Instruction Computing. Each instruction has a specification on how it is to be run on a distributed system.

    Don't feed the trolls!

  • Did you read the article? AMD is transitioning to .13 micron at the end of this year, and I pity the fools at Intel for having only the misconceived P4 to compete with them. Once the die shrinks, old Athlon heat problems will not crop up until we're well past 2GHz.

    About motherboards: Do you know who is making the new MP chipset? AMD themselves--and according to all reports, it rocks. And it's not like Intel hasn't had its share of problems with chipsets. Sure, Athlon+VIA will always probably suck, but for the same amount of money as a P4+MB you'll always be able to buy a faster Athlon with a better MB.

    I personally think the P4 is Intel's curse, and bad news for them is far from over. I would be biting my fingernails if the earnings of my company depended entirely on something as shoddy as the P4 design.

    Anyone who's checked pricewatch [pricewatch.com] would have to be insane to buy a P4.

  • You do know that the Tualitin uses the same P6 core that debuted on the Pentium Pro, and is clock for clock, faster than the P4 which is the one that has the utterly stupid lengthened pipelines which allow it to ramp up to such high clock speeds, right?
  • I work in Tualatin every day. Nice place. Haven't you ever thought the "York" in "New York" was a pretty stupid name? Really, you get used to it.

    Back in the beginning people did think Pentium was a stupid name. Now, nothing weird about it. You just get used to it.

    Anyway don't make fun of it. Plenty of people live in Tualatin, drive on the Tualatin Valley highway, etc...

  • Timna, for the record, is the name of an ancient (Egyptian, I think) copper mine (get it yet?) in what is currently Israel. I actually visited the place last year. A little surreal.

    Anyway the Israel references come because Intel has a big fab and research center over there.

  • Sorry. I have no problem with the name "York," I was just illustrating my point, which is that no matter how strange a name may sound you eventually get used to it.

    By the way, the next city over from Tualatin is called Beaverton.

  • this is not fun, it's not funny...

    Celtiin
    Feltroin
    Feltroio
    Fellatan
    Celtraon
    Fellatin
    Vagerin
    Vageron
    Tuainoon
    Vagtiio
    Pentium
    Penerim
    Vagtion
    Nertiin
    Tuatraam
    Celtaim
    Feleram
    Vagtraam
    Tuataan
    Nererio
    Celunion
    Tuatian
    Nertian
    Penuniin
    Tualatim
    Tuaerio
    Celtaum
    Feluniam
    Vaginoam
    Celtaio
    Tuainoon
    Tuauniio
    Celtraio
    Tualatam
    Celuniim
    Feltraon
    Celtraio
    Celtium
    Tuataio
    Vagtaan
    Pentrain
    Feleron
    Feltaum
    Tualatan
    Feltroin
    Penunium
    Tuainoin
    Nerlatin
    Tuataum
    Penerim
    Fellatio
    Tuainoam
    Nerlatio
    Peneron
    Fellatim
    Vagtaam
    Celtaum
    Tuainoan
    Nereron
    Feltaim
    Vageram
    Tuatraio
    Tuatroim
    Penuniim
    Penunion
    Pentraum
    Nertraon
    Tuatraan
    Pentraam
    Celinoio
    Feltrain
    Nerlatio
    Tuaerio
    Vageron
    Vagtroim
    Vagtraan
    Vagtraan
    Celtiin
    Nertraio
    Celtiam
    Felunium
    Feltraam
    Tualatan
    Celerin
    Nererio
    Vaglatum
    Feltraan
    Tuainoon
    Feltiam
    Nertion
    Feltaam
    Nerinoan
    Pentaim
    Tuaerum
    Nertaon
    Vagtaim
    Vagtraio
    Celinoon
    Pentroim
    Nerlatim
    Felinoam
    Pentaio
    Tuainoio
    Vagtraum
    Celtaon
    Celinoim
    Tuatiam
    Feltiam
    Penerio
    Tuatraon
    Feltroio
    Vagerum
    Celtain
    Peninoin
    Nererio
    Penlatim
    Feltroam
    Nertraim
    Celinoin
    Tuatroam
    Tualatan
    Feltraan
    Celtraan
    Penlatum
    Vagtraan
    Vaguniin
    Tuatroam
    Pentaan
    Celtiin
    Vagtaum
    Peneran
    Tualatum
    Cellatio
    Neruniio
    Tuatroim
    Celtroam
    Celunium
    Nerunium
    Vagtion
    Penerum
    Tualaton
    Tuatrain
    Vagunian
    Feltiim
    Cellatin
    Vagtaam
    Nertaum
    Peninoum
    Celtaan
    Celinoan
    Pentraan
    Celtroon
    Felinoam
    Pentiam
    Pentiin
    Feltaan
    Nerunion
    Tuataum
    Neruniin
    Nertroan
    Nerinoum
    Celtium
    Nertrain
    Celunium
    Nertaum
    Vaglatum
    Tuauniio
    Nertaan
    Vagerin
    Vagtiin
    Nerlatin
    Pentroio
    Tuatium
    Nererum
    Neruniam
    Nererin
    Nerlatam
    Tuataan
    Fellatin
    Vaglatan
    Tuaunian
    Vagtaim
    Pentraon
    Celtroan
    Tuaeran
    Tualatan
    Nertroin
    Tuatraon
    Neruniin
    Vagtraan
    Vaglatan
    Nererum
    Tuatiam
    Vagtraam
    Feltian
    Nerinoum
    Peninoim
    Pentian
    Penlaton
    Vagtaan
    Feltroio
    Vaglatin
    Nertroam
    Tuatroan
    Felunion
    Pentraon
    Celtium
    Tuauniin
    Peninoio
    Nertroan
    Vaglatum
    Feltroin
    Penuniio
    Nerlatam
    Celuniim
    Vagtroio
    Felerim
    Tuatroum
    Feltroan
    Vaguniim
    Nertaon
    Penunium
    Vagtraan
    Celtiim
    Celtain
    Nererum
    Fellatum
    Nereron
    Pentaio
    Tuatiin
    Celtroum
    Tuaerio
    Nertiam
    Pentroim
    Vagtiio
    Vagtraon
    Vagtroum
    Felinoan
    Celtion
    Celerio
    Feltaam
    Vaglatio
    Celtian
    Tuaeron
    Peninoio
    Pentiio
    Tuaerin
    Peninoan
    Feltaan
    Peninoum
    Felerio
    Tuauniin
    Nertraon
    Felinoin
    Tuataim
    Vagerin
    Nertraim
    Tuatroim
    Celerim
    Penunium
    Peneram
    Nerlatin
    Tuatroio
    Vagtiio
    Feltain
    Nertraum
    Pentroon
    Tuainoin
    Celeran
    Celtaio
    Nertaon
    Vageram
    Tuaerio
    Feleron
    Pentraum
    Feltroin
    Tuaunian
    Pentaam
    Nereran
    Feluniio
    Tuaerin
    Vagtaio
    Feltion
    Vagerum
    Vagtroam
    Peneran
    Celerum
    Tuainoam
    Tualaton
    Felerio
    Pentiio
    Fellatim
    Penlatam
    Celtaio
    Nertroim
    Vaginoio
    Celinoio
    Penlatim
    Vaguniim
    Penlatio
    Nertroin
    Felerin
    Fellatan
    Celtraio
    Tuataio
    Vaglaton
    Tuation
    Nerinoum
    Tuatroin
    Tuatiam
    Feltroam
    Penlatum
    Celtraio
    Celtroum
    Vagtraan
    Vaginoin
    Cellatio
    Vaginoam
    Penlatin
    Feltroio
    Celtiio
    Tuaerum
    Fellatan
    Felerim
    Nertroio
    Vagtroon
    Pentroon
    Pentraam
    Celerin
    Vagtraio
    Pentroon
    Vagtraum
    Peninoin
    Celuniam
    Tualatio
    Tuatiim
    Nerinoum
    Celtroum
    Feltroim
    Tuatroin
    Feltaio
    Nertraim
    Celeram
    Nerinoio
    Tuaunium
    Neruniio
    Celtiin
    Nererim
    Celtiim
    Felunium
    Felinoio
    Celtaio
    Nertaon
    Feltiin
    Celtiio
    Penuniio
    Celuniio
    Penlatum
    Celinoin
    Peninoum
    Vagunian
    Pentroam
    Pentain
    Feltiim
    Cellatum
    Tuaeran
    Fellaton
    Vaginoon
    Nertroio
    Feltiam
    Feltraan
    Tuainoin
    Feltion
    Pentain
    Tuainoum
    Vaglatan
    Vagtain
    Nertraum
    Felunium
    Penlatam
    Celerim
    Neruniam
    Nertiam
    Felinoon
    Nertiin
    Tuaerin
    Tuauniam
    Celuniam
    Neruniam
    Pentroio
    Tuatraam
    Nerlaton
    Tualatim
    Nererio
    Tuatraum
    Feltiio
    Tuatiin
    Nerinoam
    Vagtraam
    Penlatan
    Feltiio
    Tuatraim
    Nertroio
    Vagtaim
    Feltraan
    Vagtraim
    Nertiin
    Feluniio
    Tuatraam
    Felinoin
    Vagtiio
    Vagtroim
    Celtaan
    Tuaerin
    Nertraan
    Cellaton
    Felunian
    Vagerin
    Tualaton
    Vagtraon
    Nertroin
    Nerinoon
    Pention
    Felinoon
    Celtiin
    Penlatio
    Feltraum
    Nerunian
    Nertiio
    Peneram
    Fellatim
    Vagtrain
    Penunion
    Nerinoio
    Feltiin
    Nertroim
    Celtraio
    Penlatio
    Feltroio
    Felinoon
    Vagtaam
    Celinoam
    Tuatiio
    Feltraim
    Celuniio
    Nertroum
    Tuatraon
    Celtaam
    Felerio
    Neruniim
    Neruniin
    Vagtroam
    Celtaon
    Feltroim
    Vaglatio
    Penuniio
    Cellatum
    Neruniam
    Nertroan
    Felinoan
    Tuauniam
    Nertaio
    Nereram
    Vagtroin
    Tuauniam
    Vagtroan
    Celerum
    Feltiim
    Fellatam
    Vageran
    Nerlatam
    Tualatim
    Penlatam
    Peninoin
    Nerinoan
    Celtiio
    Penunion
    Feltiin
    Cellatam
    Tuataan
    Vagtroim
    Pentroon
    Vagtaio
    Nerinoio
    Tuaeran
    Pentaam
    Tuatroim
    Celerum
    Feltiim
    Tuatian
    Vaguniam
    Nererin
    Vagtraan
    Peninoim
    Nertaan
    Nerinoam
    Nerinoim
    Nerlatio
    Penlatam
    Pentain
    Tuauniio
    Vaginoan
    Vaguniam
    Nertain
    Tuatraam
    Celtraon
    Feltiim
    Fellatan
    Pention
    Feltiio
    Nerinoim
    Vagtroio
    Celtraum
    Celinoim
    Nerunian
    Nertiin
    Vagtraon
    Tuauniio
    Vagtraam
    Nerinoum
    Feluniim
    Pentraum
    Vaginoin
    Vagerum
    Penlatan
    Fellatam
    Tuataim
    Penunium
    Nertraim
    Vaglatio
    Pentaum
    Pentraio
    Celtraim
    Celinoio
    Nererim
    Nertrain
    Vagtraam
    Tuainoin
    Celtiim
    Nertain
    Fellatim
    Vaginoum
    Tuatraan
    Celerin
    Celtium
    Vagtraan
    Fellaton
    Feltroim
    Tuaeram
    Nerunion
    Celuniam
    Vaguniam
    Tuaerin
    Tualatum
    Tuaerim
    Celtroam
    Pentraon
    Penlatim
    Vagtain
    Vaginoan
    Tuatraim
    Celtain
    Vagtraio
    Tuatraio
    Celtroan
    Celuniam
    Celinoan
    Penuniio
    Nertaam
    Vaguniin
    Celtroum
    Tuaerio
    Vagunian
    Peninoum
    Vagtraam
    Felerum
    Tuatroio
    Tualatam
    Celuniin
    Celtroum
    Cellatan
    Tuaeron
    Vagunion
    Pentraum
    Vagtaum
    Cellaton
    Tuaeron
    Cellatam
    Vagtaim
    Vagerim
    Celtiim
    Feleram
    Vaginoan
    Tuainoum
    Felinoon
    Felinoum
    Tuauniam
    Celinoin
    Vaginoim
    Vaginoum
    Vagtraon
    Nerlatio
    Vagtiim
    Penerum
    Feltroum
    Vaglatum
    Pentraim
    Tuatroum
    Fellatim
    Nertroan
    Tuataon
    Celtroum
    Feltaio
    Nerinoam
    Vagtiio
    Tuataan
    Felerim
    Pentiim
    Fellatum
    Tuaeron
    Tualatio
    Celtium
    Penlatan
    Pentroon
    Felinoam
    Felunian
    Nerinoam
    Celtraam
    Feluniim
    Penerin
    Vagtraam
    Felunian
    Vaglatam
    Nereran
    Celerio
    Celinoum
    Pentroim
    Nerinoon
    Celtrain
    Celtaon
    Vagtraon
    Fellatin
    Feltroim
    Nerinoim
    Tuainoio
    Tuatain
    Penuniim
    Tuatiio
    Penuniio
    Felerin
    Vagtraio
    Celinoin
    Peninoim
    Pentroan
    Nertraan
    Vagtaam
    Felerio
    Felerim
    Tuatroin
    Celtraim
    Fellatan
    Cellatim
    Tuataam
    Tuatain
    Vagtian
    Cellatan
    Feltiio
    Pentroim
    Nertium
    Celinoin
    Vaginoan
    Tuaeram
    Tualatin
    Felinoio
    Nerlatan
    Tuatroam
    Nerlatam
    Pentraum
    Felerum
    Nertiio
    Vaginoam
    Vagtroum
    Fellatin
    Celtraim
    Vagtroio
    Penerim
    Celtaim
    Celtraum
    Fellatum
    Pentaio
    Vagtraum
    Vagerim
    Cellatum
    Celeron
    Nertiam
    Vagerim
    Vaglatam
    Tuataam
    Tualatio
    Peninoin
    Nertion
    Tuaerum
    Tuatraio
    Felerum
    Nertian
    Tuaunium
    Pentroio
    Felerin
    Felunium
    Fellatan
    Nertain
    Nertroin
    Vagtraon
    Vaguniam
    Pentiam
    Celtroio
    Celtraio
    Pention
    Tuaeron
    Celinoio
    Tuataon
    Vageram
    Feleram
    Fellatin
    Nertraim
    Felerin
    Vageram
    Vageran
    Celinoin
    Vaguniin
    Tuainoam
    Pentiio
    Celtraam
    Penerio
    Nertraam
    Celinoio
    Penuniio
    Vagtroon
    Celinoin
    Vaglaton
    Pentaan
    Tuainoum
    Nertain
    Cellatan
    Tuatian
    Celtraan
    Vagtroim
    Tuatroan
    Felerum
    Nertraam
    Nerinoim
    Peninoum
    Tuatroam
    Tuainoam
    Tuatraio
    Tualatim
    Neruniim
    Celinoim
    Pentraio
    Pentroin
    Penlatan
    Tuauniio
    Feltiim
    Feltaan
    Tuauniim
    Felunion
    Feleram
    Vaglatan
    Celtrain
    Nerlatum
    Pentraum
    Vagtraim
    Fellaton
    Penlaton
    Pentaio
    Feltraim
    Feltraan
    Nerlatim
    Nertroan
    Cellatum
    Celuniio
    Vaglatum
    Nertroim
    Pentraum
    Tualatam
    Tuatraim
    Peneram
    Pentraim
    Pentraim
    Tualatan
    Tuatroam
    Fellatan
    Vageron
    Tualatam
    Vageran
    Nerinoam
    Nertroan
    Penunium
    Tuatiim
    Tuatiim
    Vaginoum
    Nertroon
    Pentaam
    Vageron
    Neruniam
    Celtraim
    Celtraam
    Pentraam
    Feltiam
    Fellatin
    Tuainoan
    Vagunian
    Feltaam
    Nereran
    Nertroum
    Pentian
    Celtiio
    Nerlatim
    Celinoan
    Feleron
    Nertaio
    Penunian
    Celtiam
    Nerlatim
    Vagtaam
    Vagtroan
    Tualatan
    Nereram
    Nerunion
    Neruniin
    Feltraam
    Vaginoio
    Tuaeram
    Tuatroim
    Celtium
    Tualatin
    Nertiin
    Vaglatum
    Vaginoam
    Vagerin
    Fellatum
    Nerunium
    Vagunium
    Tuaerio
    Tuainoin
    Celtaan
    Pentroum
    Tuataum
    Tuaeron
    Tuatraim
    Vagtraio
    Nertaam
    Nertion
    Vageran
    Tualatum
    Celtraio
    Celtaio
    Tuainoin
    Felerim
    Pentrain
    Pentain
    Celerum
    Nertraan
    Vagunium
    Pentaon
    Celtroam
    Feltroim
    Tuatraon
    Nertiin
    Celtaam
    Nereron
    Vageram
    Penerin
    Tuatraum
    Nereram
    Cellaton
    Feltraio
    Feluniam
    Tuainoio
    Nertrain
    Tuatraan
    Tuatraan
    Nerlatin
    Tuatroio
    Penlatim
    Tuauniim
    Tuatiin
    Felinoan
    Celtian
    Tuaunium
    Nerlatan
    Tuaerio
    Celtroam
    Celtroon
    Penlatio
    Penunian
    Feleron
    Tuaunium
    Pentium
    Nerinoin
    Pentraum
    Tuataim
    Tuatiam
    Nertium
    Tuatium
    Celtroam
    Vagtion
    Peneron
    Tuataim
    Vaginoin
    Feltaum
    Vagtroon
    Celtion
    Tuaeram
    Feluniin
    Celerum
    Vagtiam
    Nertroin
    Feltiim
    Tuatraum
    Nertraum
    Celerum
    Pentrain
    Felunium
    Pentiim
    Penlatio
    Vaginoim
    Tuatraon
    Celtiin
    Feltaio
    Vagerio
    Celunian
    Peninoan
    Felinoam
    Tuatroin
    Nertion
    Nertiio
    Feleron
    Pentain
    Vaginoin
    Nereron
    Pentaam
    Feltroum
    Pentian
    Peninoim
    Feltroon
    Fellatan
    Tuatroin
    Celtian
    Fellatin
    Tuatiio
    Feltiin
    Celtraon
    Feleran
    Pentroan
    Peninoim
    Felinoan
    Nertaio
    Feluniio
    Vaginoan
    Penuniin
    Celtaan
    Feltraum
    Feltraon
    Vagtraam
    Celtraim
    Cellatim
    Pentroin
    Celinoam
    Feltraum
    Vaginoam
    Tuainoan
    Feluniio
    Celerio
    Celtroio
    Celinoin
    Celtraim
    Nertraio
    Nerlatum
    Feltian
    Celtaon
    Tuatroan
    Pentroio
    Nerlatan
    Tuatiam
    Tualatio
    Tuaunion
    Tuatroim
    Peninoum
    Vagtiio
    Pention
    Vaginoin
    Tuatiio
    Nerlatin
    Celunion
    Celtrain
    Nererum
    Vaglatin
    Pentiam

    ---
  • Re:Multi Processor Boxes (Score:2, Informative)
    thursday


    best moderation ever.
  • by Fishstick (150821) on Monday July 30, 2001 @07:42AM (#2183465) Journal
    thanks for the chuckle

    You forgot "results similar to sugarpill"

    Since when does a sugarpill induce vomiting, nausea, headaches in 0.0001% of patients studied?

    Makes you wonder about some of these people who sign up for these mediacation studies, eh?

    "Now, mr Smith, we are prepared to pay you $50 a week to participate in our estrogen replacement therapy trial. You will be part of the study in which we will secretly replace the hormone pills with a harmless placebo, ok?"

    "aw man, I think I'm gonna hurl!"

    "excellent"

    ---
    Hi! How are you?
    I send you this .sig in order to have your advice

  • That sort of sounds like the rune system for the Diablo 2 Expansion Pack. Maybe that is where Blizzard got the idea.
    -- Judas96
    "...don't take a nerf bat to a knife fight." - Joe Rogan, said on News Radio
  • The PPC chip is also as fast as the slowest x86. Wow.
  • Perhaps you should attempt to provide some real life numbers. Photoshop tests do not count. Has it ever occured to you that Jobs has yet to benchmark his precious PPC against anything but Photoshop for the last few years at MacWorld?

    Heres One for you - straight from the horses mouth: http://www.macworld.com/2001/07/buzz/ppcvpentium.h tml

    Im tired of this mhz!=real life speed argument. The fact is you maclots scream and whine and try to drive that point home so much (which I do agree with by the way - take any Alpha chip as an example) you absolutely forgot that you had to provide real life numbers in order to really back these claims up.

    And as far as the heat a PPC generates is concerned all I have to say is BULLSHIT. Take a long hard look at the HUGE heatsink sitting on those chips in any of the Apple boxes for a clear explanation as to what I mean. The P4 may have a 1 lb heatsink - but so does the G4. Why is it that you think it took them YEARS to get a G4 into a laptop? Why is it that you think everybody complains about the heat generated for a TiBook?

    Yes I owned a dual 450 G4 when those first came out. It was a decent box. But the P3 1ghz dell I replaced it with three months later just slices and dices it in every way shape and form. And it was half the price.

    I could go on and on and refute your claims - but its a waste of my time. Your RDF is fully engaged and I accept that as a reality. Its too bad that you are unable to do that same regarding the fact that the G4 is simply outclassed by modern x86 chips.

    Gam
    "Flame at Will"
  • You "assume" that it will be quality chipset. What evidence do you have to back this up? Personally Im a HUGE fan of Nvidia but for you to simply ASSUME that their first venture (ahem.... well I guess you could count the xbox) into the field of integrated chipsets will be shining with quality is proposterous speculation to say the least.

    As far as the NForce goes - I say wait and see what happens. Its bit pricy for an intergated chipset so it will be interesting to gauge the market acceptance for such a product.

    If anything the Nforce has brought us Dual Channel DDR Ram - perhaps now DDR will be able to fully compete with Rambus memory (Say what you will but Rambus is clearly superior to its competitors - submissions proving otherwise will be considered.)

    Oh yeah one more thing - the Nforce will force the fools at Creative to get off their collective asses and produce something New for change. Afterall the sound portion of the Nforce makes the SBLive look like crap from what I understand.

    Gam
    "Flame at WIll"
  • Take a look at the link you set me. You'll notice that the numbers are provided by the people who own the machines. Yep thats right - these are COMPLETELY 100% unvalidated statistics. Thanks for playing please try again.

    Sample: http://n0cgi.distributed.net/speed/query.cgi?cputy pe=all&arch=2&contest=all

    There is an entry for a PowerPC G4 with a speed of 417,928,832. That smells like.... bullshit!

    Gam
    "Flame at Will"
  • Yeah the 6.49/6.5 drivers seem to provide the best reliability. 12.x may be faster but there are a few games which dont work with them.

    Gam
  • That being the case then - I do believe you lost your own argument with the numbers you provided. Do the math :-)

    Besides the OGR results you provided is wrong - its really 5.3 instead of 6.5 you misrepresented it as.

    Either way - these results are user submitted and not verified in any way shape or form. Reliance upon numbers such as these is exactly why so many maclots are living in the RDF.

    I will admit that clock for clock the G4 is faster at CERTAIN tasks - but the question remains, just how much faster? It depends upon the operation and the fact is - not many people are doing RC5 and OGR work.

    But when I achieve double the framerate in Quake III (or any game for that matter - the video card is a mute point because the G4 is so limited for that kind of processing), choose from a LARGE number of operating systems (more than 3 or 4), go into any computer store and buy a component to place into my PC, and get all that at HALF the price of a PC - you let me know and I'll probably make the mistake of purchasing a macintosh again.

    Gam
    This Conversation is OVER. You have annoyed me enough.
  • It was an example. The point was to show you just how unreliable those numbers really are.
  • That's irony for you...

    What piles the irony on even thicker is that Tom's Hardware got their hands on a prerelease version a month or so back and found out that it overclocked to be even faster than a P4 at the same speed. At the time the author of the article had a hunch that Intel might not even bother releasing it because of the marketing snafu it would cause.

    /Brian
  • Announcing the Intel Feltrain...

    /Brian
  • Actually, i've found the other way works, bad printer drivers will cause netscape to break. The HP4000 series fo drivers are bad for that.. v3.3 is buggy, but 3.2 and 3.4 were good. HP changed their drivers for the latest versions, and what used to default to regular speed printing is now the high quality. So the print jobs come out at half the speed, unless you go through and set the settings back, for _every_ document. HP didn't want to help, cause it's an HP4000, instead of a 4050, which is still covered under support
  • IBM was working on this for it's Power line (not PowerPC). Dammit, can't find any links to anything concrete.
  • As other folks have said, the code names are all rivers in Oregon.

    The "release" name Pentium was created by some marketing name-creating droid, the same fine folks who gave us Agilent [salon.com] et. al. Penta evokes "5" (the 586) while the "ium" supposed to evoke an elemental ingredient, like plutonium.

    The reason for this was the old AMD and Cyrix vs Intel disputes. Intel used to use them as external fabs, they had access to designs and such. When the 486 came out, Intel wanted to bring stuff back in-house, and also distance with the other guys, make them sound cooler. So, they tried to trademark i486, for the real Intel blessed 486. Judge laughed, you can't trademark numbers. Next time around, they came up with a trademarkable name, the Pentium. That begat the 5x86 and 6x86 from Cyrix, and Athlon and Duron, cause now all the cool kids had to have names.

  • Make sure benchmarks or apps have optimized code for the processor they are running on, and make sure the setup is the same for both processors.

    Even this isn't enough. In the case of PowerPC vs. Intel, because of the AltiVec unit, the problem set can be chosen to be better on one system vs. another.

    The entire thing right now I think some folks miss seeing in the race to have the best is that 99% of stuff out there will do what most folks need. I had a friend (thanks to Intel Inside-eous marketing) ask me if his 800Mhz Celeron would let him surf the Internet faster. Umm, Idunno if libpr0n has been optimized for MMX, but I'd say yeah.

    On another note with 'optimized' benchmarks. I remember some story of some UNIX vendor a long time ago that rewrote their compiler so that it would detect a certain canned benchmark. If would then "optimize" it to become nothing but a giant no-op loop. You can go through a loop pretty fast if it does nothing. For some reason they always won that benchmark test. Though they obviously violated the spirit of the benchmark, thoy could honestly claim they were the fastest through that code. Be careful what you're testing.

  • I suspect that it's mainly due to marketing. Intel/AMD can sell more units of a faster (MHz-wise) chip to the value market, even if it has no/little cache, rather than a chip with cache and lower clockspeed.

    Most people look at a chip primarily by the clockspeed--higher MHz sells better.

  • The problem is that there are so many varients of the P3 and Athlon that the outside world still keeps these names to tell the difference.

    Admittedly as clock speeds increase it's obvious what version it is (i.e. there is only one 1.3 GHz Athlon - for now). But oftentimes the overlap requires those who follow the industry to mention the development name so they know exactly which one they are talking about.

    Right now you can call up most computer stores and say, "I want a 1.3 GHz Thunderbird." and they will know exactly what you want.

    Until AMD and Intel come up with distinct names for each chip generation, the internal names will be known and used by people in the hardware business.

  • by Chundra (189402) on Monday July 30, 2001 @07:27AM (#2183482)
    Sounds like some new allergy medication. Ask your doctor if Tualatin is right for you. (Side effects include nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, headaches, dizziness, bloody noses, and chronic rashes. During clinical trials some patients experienced arcs of electricity emanating from their nipples.)
    --
  • by Chundra (189402) on Monday July 30, 2001 @07:33AM (#2183483)
    Or Vaginoan. Hmm. Greetings Intel executive I am a Vaginoan, I have travelled across the galaxy to bring you this Fellatio.
    --
  • While Athalon's may be fast they are not always stable and can run exceptionally hot. This aside I would still buy an AMD chip over an Intel at the moment, (just based on price alone, never mind performance.) Yet some don't necessarily trust AMD, be it Intel's propaganda machine, or consumer distrust after such great processor manufacturers like Cyrix. To this day I know people who prefer Intel's exclusively (not including the P4's) the Intel line has always been reliable (okay ignoring the Pentium bug as well.) So it almost goes back to the old fable of the tortoise and the hare, while AMD might be a superior processor speed wise, Intel has maintained stability. While AMD completes for market share with low prices, Intel plods along with new technology a little slower, and a lot more expensive.

    This won't be the same forever, as Intel brings its price down, and now that AMD has (in my mind) more then established itself as a solid competitor we should soon see a all out pitched battle for supremacy that should in the end have a net benefit for the consumer. (Well here's hoping at least)
    Geoffrey Cameron Peart
    McMaster Software Engineering
  • by MtViewGuy (197597) on Monday July 30, 2001 @07:34AM (#2183485)
    Judging from reading the Anandtech review of the new 1,200 MHz Pentium III CPU, I think the problem is that the CPU--while it is very fast indeed--still sports the older-style FPU unit. The result is that the new CPU compares poorly to the Athlon CPU, which processes three FPU instructions per CPU cycle compared one instruction per CPU cycle on PIII's.

    The poor FPU performance is why I don't think there will be much interest in the new CPU, especially since the 1,200 MHz Athlon CPU will substantially out-perform the new PIII CPU with any application that is FPU-intensive such as CAD and illustration programs.
  • The 'Q' is silent, you see.

  • I haven't had any experience with a TiVO, but a lot of consumer-level (and that's all I can afford) MPEG-2 encoding hardware for PC produces truly lousy quality video compared to what the software encoders can do.

    Still, I'm sure you're right, and I have faith that the market for this sort of thing will improve. But I was really just trying to make a point about the old "we don't need more speed" argument...

    You ALWAYS need more speed. If someone can't figure out what to do with more CPU power, they don't have much imagination.
  • Encoding DVDs.

    With my 1GHz Athlon, it takes ~10 hours to encode 1 hour of MPEG-2 DVD video (720x480 MPEG-2 7M-9M/s).

    A 10GHz CPU with linear scaling from my current 1GHz CPU would reduce the time from about 10 hours to about 1 hour. So, if I could just get a 100GHz CPU, I would finally be able to encode 2 hours of MJPEG DV or VHS capture in just about 12 minutes.

    That would be nice.
  • 1996 (guess not revised since 1988)
  • But I think you're missing the point. The point of the P3 is not to beat the tar out of the AMD line. That's why there is a 2GHz P4 slated for later this year. That's why P4 will migrate to .13u and possibly hit 3Ghz next year. AMD will struggle to hit 2GHz next year. I'm thinking they are in the compromising position to make a big mistake trying to keep their speed up (recall Intel and the 1.13GHz P3 last year).

    Anyhow, anyone who buys the P3 will probably want it because it's cheaper, it works in their old P3 socket, it uses less power, etc. It could replace the Celeron line temporarily.

    If it does have the old FPU (and we don't really know that it does) then so what? It's a shrink. And it's an EOL product. Intel has said that this will likely be the last desktop rev of the P3. I wouldn't expect them to spend the development costs to design and integrate a new FPU into a product that will not continue to evolve. That would be insane.

  • But i can have the Internet at home with it, plus, my Word runs better on that prozessor,
    its really slow now, you know.
    BTW, can I check my e-mail with it? That would be great. I think then i could finally open those attachments...
    Oh, my son says he'll have more fps then, well, is that something with girls?

  • Intersting name, it has to have been named after the sound it made when throw across the room.... As there have been so many problems in their release they had to have thrown a bunch of them away.. (actual recording from Intel devlopment labs) "Ralph another one did not pass" " Well Joe, toss it" *Finggggg* *Tulana* *Tin* *chink* *Tink* *tink* *plink* "Now Joe, I did not say "name it", I said toss it on the pile"


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
  • All I can say is: "Holy-COW Batman!"

    Gee, I'd love to have one of those on my desktop... no idea what I'd use it for, but I'd still love to have one!

    MadCow.

  • Hey, why not have dual processors on the same die? Sure, you're looking at a huge die, but for multi-threaded apps you'd sure see a good improvement. And, having all the processor bridges on die would speed things nicly over a "traditional" multi-cpu box.

    Just-dreaming-ly-yours,

    Madcow.

  • Oh come on... this guy is lying... don't any of you know what VLIW is? AMD doesn't have any VLIW offerings... The Intel Itanium is basically a VLIW processor, and we all see how well that worked out...
    feh
  • What you've said is a little misleading... The intel proc has a pipelined FMAC (floating point multiply accumulate), so in a sense it can do two FP ops per cycle (a multiply and an add). Also, one of the FP pipelines in the K7 (still an infinitely cooler name than athlon) is for the fswap instruction, which is only necessary for maintaining the FP stack, and doesn't actually perform any truly "useful" work
  • If you can point me to some documentation of this fact I'd be grateful then...
  • by tbone1 (309237) on Monday July 30, 2001 @08:46AM (#2183498) Homepage
    Well, it's spelled "Tualatin" but it's pronounced "Throatwarbler Mangrove".

  • How about actually having a chance at winning the RSA contest posted last week ;-)
  • NVIDIA's drivers have been giving me random opengl lockup problems on two different dual proc boxes. After some usenet searching it seems to be a problem with their drivers and dual proc machines.
  • No. No they weren't. Thanks for playing, though.
  • by Dr. Prakash Kothari (314326) on Monday July 30, 2001 @07:27AM (#2183503)
    Where can I get the new Intel Fellatio?
  • by Dwain_Snyders (412284) on Monday July 30, 2001 @07:34AM (#2183508) Homepage
    Intel's announcement is a bit misleading, while this chip is certainly nothing to sneeze at (looking comparitively at their other offerings) in the power-saving department, it lacks pure power due to the new core.

    At AMD, the latest generation of chips are currently being designed with flow-through core transistors, so it'll really be more like a "smart capacitor" than a integrated circuit, like most CPUs. I have been tasked with writing the VLIW compiler for the new chips, and I can tell you that they really do fly, and use less power than teh traditional Athlon/Duron series, while retaining the power and in fact doing a lot of optimisation thanks to the new VLIW instructions that are being ingrained into the core.

    All I can say is, folks, look out for this one. It will be hot. (but not because of excessive power consumption :))

    Dwain Snyders

    Research and Development, AMD
  • by hoggoth (414195) on Monday July 30, 2001 @07:06AM (#2183509) Journal
    >i feel outdated that my chip is .18 micron.
    Don't feel bad... my "chip" is only 4"
    Oh God... you're all talking about microprocessors... I thought you were talking about... I'm so embarrassed...

  • "This new Pentium III, code-named Tualatin during its development"

    Did you see that? It says 'code named', meaning it's not neccesarily going to ship under that name. Read the article...

    Remember the AMD Duron's code name was 'Spitfire'. You don't need me to tell you it didn't ship under that name.
  • "Too all a tin"
    It's named after a bunch of stuff in Portland, OR... the Tualatin River, Tualatin Valley... etc.
  • It's great to have speed, but it's even better if you actually have stuff you do that uses all of it; what's your favorite CPU-intensive activity? Decryption? Creating 3D movies? AI? Computing the entire Othello game tree? Playing hand-coded-assembly Pong at a blinding pace? Or has clock speed finally surpassed practical use?

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