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My degree of colorblindness:

Displaying poll results.
I am not colorblind, as far as I know
  14613 votes / 86%
I am mildly colorblind (red-green)
  1249 votes / 7%
I am severely colorblind (red-green)
  266 votes / 1%
I am mildly colorblind (blue-yellow)
103 votes / 0%
I am severely colorblind (blue-yellow)
17 votes / 0%
I have a different form of colorblindness
  463 votes / 2%
I am totally colorblind
124 votes / 0%
16835 total votes.
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  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
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My degree of colorblindness:

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  • Different colors (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @04:39PM (#47617565)

    My two eyes see different colors. This is actually quite weird and I wonder if that affects other people...

    • Re: Different colors (Score:4, Interesting)

      by caffiend666 (598633) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @05:13PM (#47617905) Homepage
      Mine do this at times. If I have been laying on one side, each side develops a noticeable red shift (more or less red), assuming because blood pressure is higher on one side than the other.... Takes a little while to go away.
      • by wanax (46819)

        I am a neuroscientist, mainly in vision, not an ophthalmologist.. but I have sat in on quite a bit of ophthalmology, done orbital dissections etc etc.. Very few physical things (ie. pressure based) can effect color perception. The main one is that you have something (either tumor, or spurious bone growth) that's pinching or entrapping your optic nerve (basically like carpel tunnel). If the same were happening to me, I'd make sure to get referred to an ophthalmology department at a research hospital and get

        • by Reziac (43301) *

          Actually it's pretty easy to demonstrate, just go out in bright sunlight, close one eye for a while, then note the difference. One eye will seem blue-shifted.

          Also, myopia affects color vision. There's some famous painter (whose name I ironically forget) who was severely myopic, as in walk-into-the-walls myopic. This was once put forth for an explanation as to why his portraits were "too red" (this was before impressionism spoiled everything).

          Anyway, if your distance vision is not the same in both eyes, yes,

          • by wanax (46819)

            Both of the effects you describe are because the fovea has thicker ganglion cell density than non-foveal regions, which can induce a color bias over the several central degrees of your visual field. It's not 100% clear to me whether the GP is describing a visual hemifield effect, or an eye based effect (in the case of hemifields, each eye sends half its signal to each visual cortex)... but either way, it doesn't to me sound like a fovea-based bias.

            (To clarify, by physical thing, I meant something that is bo

    • Re:Different colors (Score:4, Interesting)

      by khellendros1984 (792761) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @07:09PM (#47618673) Journal
      My pupils are different sizes at the same light level, and always have been. In the right lighting conditions, one eye is shifted more toward red and the other is more toward blue.
    • by Cyberax (705495)
      Yes, that's very common. Usually the color shift is too small to be noticeable - I can detect mine only in specific conditions.
    • by Cenan (1892902)

      I see deeper shades of green with my left eye. I have not noticed it with any other colors, only that it is very noticeable in the summer with all the green around. The difference is kind of like the difference between a cheap LED monitor and a plasma TV. I asked my optician about it last time I was in, and she said it was quite common.

    • by michelcolman (1208008) on Thursday August 07, 2014 @07:42AM (#47621725)

      My two eyes see different colors. This is actually quite weird and I wonder if that affects other people...

      Since you asked: no, it doesn't bother me in the slightest that you have this problem.

    • by X10 (186866)

      I guess no two eyes are the same, that goes for one person's eyes too. I see colors more bright with one eye than the other. At the tennis court, one with orange gravel, my left eye sees the gravel as a faded orange, while the right eye sees it as bright orange.

      • by arth1 (260657)

        I guess no two eyes are the same, that goes for one person's eyes too.

        True. Having two left eyes or two right eyes would be awkward.

        • by hesiod (111176)

          True. Having two left eyes or two right eyes would be awkward.

          Yes it is: just ask Picasso's models.

    • by Nidi62 (1525137)
      Same here. If I look out of one eye and then the other, I can discern that eye sees bluer/darker and the other eye sees redder/brighter. I've always wondered if this is a common thing or not.
    • by ProZachar (410739)

      Different materials have different abilities to focus white light. Just about every lens-quality material will not bend the components of white light equally and will end up spreading them out a bit. This manifests itself as red and blue/violet tinges. It's called chromatic abberation and it's measured by something called an Abbe number.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromatic_aberration
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbe_number

      Polycarbonate lenses drive me nuts because their Abbe number is too low; everything look

      • by Reziac (43301) *

        Ahhhh, so I'm not alone! I hate the damn things! Grew up with glass lenses, and there is NO comparison. I never stop seeing the damned poly lenses as if there's poorly-cleaned glass in front of my eyes.

    • One of my eyes sees cool colors a bit better and the other sees warm colors a bit better. I use the differential to help me mix colors accurately when I paint or do illustration.
    • I pass the colour-blindness tests very quickly with each eye. However, colour intensity varies between my eyes. One eye sees a bright world. It's a more faded world with the other eye. I attribute the difference to ageing rods/cones/whatever. I didn't have this problem when I was younger.

  • by Ruzty (46204) <rusty&mraz,org> on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @04:40PM (#47617569) Journal

    No one in my family, both lineage and extended, is colorblind at all. My wife's father was very R-G color blind and it seems my son is mildly as well.

  • by multimediavt (965608) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @04:41PM (#47617587)
    I have had my eyes checked regularly as I wear glasses and have since age five. They test for colorblindness when you get your eyes checked. WTF is up with "as far as I know?" I know I am not colorblind, at all.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @05:42PM (#47618149)

      I have had my eyes checked regularly as I wear glasses and have since age five. They test for colorblindness when you get your eyes checked. WTF is up with "as far as I know?"

      First off, people whose vision is normal don't tend to get regular eye exams. You take a test in school when you're in grade school, they say "Congratulations! You're 20/20!", and aside from a perfunctory "Please read line 4" at the DMV, they don't worry about their eyesight until age 60 or so, when you start to need reading glasses. It's only people who regularly wear corrective lenses who go for eye exams regularly, to make sure their prescription is still doing the job.

      Secondly, the colorblindness test they do as part of a normal eye exam is rather poor for detecting mild colorblindness. You see a faint and indistinct "5" in the dots, and you're lumped together with everyone who sees a clear and unambiguous "5". There's plates in the back of the book which can help tease this out, but standard eye exams don't usually go that far. They do the first few pages which are good for severe deficiencies, but not for more mild ones. I don't know about your eye exam place, but the ones I've gone to typically don't even do that. They might have done it once for the first visit, but for repeat visits they tend not to. (I presume they rely on the notation in the charts.)

      I've worn glasses since I was 10, and it was only in my late 20s that I learned I had mild red/green colorblindness. And that was only because I insisted that I get a thorough test from my eye doctor. The result actually raised a bit of a mild concern, as changes in color vision can indicate serious eye issues. I checked out clean, though, and they said I probably have had (undiagnosed) mild colorblindness for my entire life. Which explains a lot, in fact. I've historically had difficulties with colors on the computer, with bright yellow and bright green being well on indistinguishable. (Whch is hell for those computer games where you're matching up yellow items and green items under a time limit.) I also have a hard time telling the difference between black text and red text on projected slides. (Annoying when presenters "highlight" text by changing the color to red.) Those annoyances were actually the reason why I insisted I get a decent color vision test - there was a series of things where I complained that certain colors were indistinguishable, and people around me looked like I grew another head, saying that the difference was patently obvious.

      So, yes, it is completely possible to be unaware of being colorblind, even despite having regular eye exams.

      • by QuesarVII (904243)

        I've historically had difficulties with colors on the computer, with bright yellow and bright green being well on indistinguishable. (Whch is hell for those computer games where you're matching up yellow items and green items under a time limit.) I also have a hard time telling the difference between black text and red text on projected slides. (Annoying when presenters "highlight" text by changing the color to red.) Those annoyances were actually the reason why I insisted I get a decent color vision test - there was a series of things where I complained that certain colors were indistinguishable, and people around me looked like I grew another head, saying that the difference was patently obvious.

        So, yes, it is completely possible to be unaware of being colorblind, even despite having regular eye exams.

        The issues you experienced with colors show that being completely unaware seems unlikely. Maybe someone who is very shy and never mentioned their difficulty with certain things might not find out it wasn't "normal" though.

      • Also, color sensitivity may decrease with age. My maternal grandmother was, by the time she died, was only able to perceive highly saturated colors--everything else was either muddy brown or grey. I've also noticed that my mother, who is an artist now in her 60s, is losing the ability to distinguish subtle shades of various colors. As for color-blindness, my father was red-green colorblind, but while its effects was barely noticeable when he was in his 20s-30s, by the time he was in his 70s it was becomi

      • by rla3rd (596810)
        Hate to tell you. The need for reading glasses starts in your 40s. Ask any one of us old geezers. Just wait until that part of your vision starts to go to hell as well.
    • by haruchai (17472) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @09:34PM (#47619561)

      Perhaps you're not colorblind but there are degrees of color acuity.
      Try this test - http://www.xrite.com/online-co... [xrite.com]
      Depending on the monitor & the ambient lighting, I've scored anywhere from 4 - 32
      And there are much more difficult tests of color acuity.

    • I too am certain that I'm not color blind. If I were, I wouldn't have been able to serve in Uncle Sam's Navy.
      • by AF_Cheddar_Head (1186601) on Thursday August 07, 2014 @08:18AM (#47621955)

        Sure you would have, just been excluded from some jobs. 25 year retiree and red-green color blind.

        At my induction physical I failed 14 of 15 color cards. Tech told me I was color blind and I replied all you had to do was ask me I could have told you that.

        BTW: Purple does not exist and is a conspiracy by the color-normal people against the disabled.

  • by Tiger4 (840741) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @04:43PM (#47617609)

    Anyone out there laughing at the pitiful earthlings with their puny RGB vision?

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Considering that Slashdot's poll options max out at 8 candidates; there should have been an option at the bottom "I am a Tetrachromat you insensitive clod!"

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Bonker (243350)

      Tetra-chromats are by definition female. You need two x chromosomes to carry the two different genes that code the two slightly different pigments.

      It's an axiom that there are no women on the internet.

      Ergo, there are no tetra-chromats on Slashdot.

    • I for one welcome our Mantis Shrimp Overlords!

      http://theoatmeal.com/comics/m... [theoatmeal.com]

  • Blank poll? (Score:5, Funny)

    by AmiMoJo (196126) * <[ten.3dlrow] [ta] [ojom]> on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @04:52PM (#47617717) Homepage

    I'm black-grey colour blind, can someone tell me what this poll is about?

    • . . . I think that it is some kind of double-blind test to see if you are racist, or something like that.

      Which races are blue and green, again? And are Silicon Valley companies hiring enough of them . . . ?

    • by treeves (963993)

      how did you know it was a poll?

  • by rossz (67331) <ogre@geek b i k e r.net> on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @05:55PM (#47618229) Homepage Journal

    I am severely red-green color blind. I am midly blue-yellow color blind.

    And the correct term is Color Deficiency Disorder, you insenstive clod.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @05:56PM (#47618231)

    I'm a UI designer for Slashdot...

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @06:20PM (#47618329)

    Not being colorblind myself I have found myself making awkward mistakes in the past; producing documents with graphs where all lines only had different colors. Or making a website where a background changes from green to red if something goes wrong. A colorblind person will have a hard time telling what is what. The golden rule is to differentiate twice, like have a graph with colored lines but also using different line patterns at the same time. Or not just change a background color, but blink it at the same time. The poll shows (at least) 10% would be helped with a little better interface designs.

  • by jtownatpunk.net (245670) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @06:27PM (#47618361)

    One time, he got the chore of painting his aunt's house. He went to the store, bought the paint, prepped the house, and painted it pink. His aunt was the only one who didn't think it was a hilarious way to find out about being colorblind.

  • Being male, I can't be a tetrachromat, but on more than one occasion I've demonstrated better color discrimination than is considered typical for males (at least as I've been told by female graphic designers). Although rare, these defects do occur in females well -- I had a girlfriend who had difficulty distinguishing between pale pink, pale orange, tan, and light gray. This was limited to pastels though, she was fine once the color saturation got bumped up a bit.

  • by Hamsterdan (815291) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @08:04PM (#47619037)

    According to the cute asian lady who checked my eyes last time, I'm colorblind (sure, I can still read color codes on capacitors and resistors), she explained to me they are different kinds of color blindness, Found out I can't see different shades of Orange (or Green) :(

  • by Hamsterdan (815291) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @08:06PM (#47619053)

    Multiple episodes show grey as pink (Klingon uniforms), because one of the guys was in fact colorblind to grey

    • by Kittenman (971447)

      Multiple episodes show grey as pink (Klingon uniforms), because one of the guys was in fact colorblind to grey

      But can you see "Shades of Grey?" (thank you, I'm here 'til Thursday)

  • I can even see octarine.

  • I do Ishihara every time I renew my aviation medical certificate.

    To respect the spirit of the test I make a point of not memorizing the numbers, and always call the number at a glance.

    Some years ago I had a colleague who chose such odd colour combinations for her clothes we wondered if she had issues in this area. This is indeed unusual in a woman, but it happens.

    ...laura

  • I seem to recall reading a stat some years back that approx 20% of men were colorblind to some degree; the percent for women was lower, but I don't remember it.

    It can manifest in situations like; you have several pairs of socks, you wash them at the same time, but some are dark blue and some are black. You go to sort them and you can't distinguish in order to pair them up. Some people have tremendous difficulty telling the difference.

    And judging by some of the house color choices in my neighborhood recently

  • Your missing two (Score:2, Interesting)

    by geekoid (135745)

    can see more colors (women only)
    can see polarized light (rare)

    • can see polarized light (rare)

      This depends on what you mean by "see". Almost anyone can learn detect if a light source is polarized by looking for a (very very) faint rainbow effect around the focus of where you're looking. Put flat white on an LCD monitor and stare at it for a bit and you'll probably be able to see it yourself if you're looking for it.

  • If you passed the standard screening test in school, you probably thought you were perfect in this regard. Actually, most of us have some weakness and there are tests for that. Try this one [color-blindness.com]. It was rather tedious for me; one of the hardest perceptual tests I've taken. You need patience, so set aside some time. I got a TES (Total Error Score) of 12. YMMV because of monitor quality and other factors. The official version of this test uses actual physical tiles, and specifies what kind of lighting to us

    • by Calibax (151875) *

      Neat test. I worked hard on it but only managed a Total Error Score of 236.

      I already knew I was color vision challenged. My mother became suspicious when I was playing with crayons and I colored a fire engine green and the grass brown. That's why my wife picks the colors for my clothes and sorts my socks so I don't accidentally wear a non-matching pair - which has happened a few times.

    • by jeffmeden (135043)

      If you passed the standard screening test in school, you probably thought you were perfect in this regard. Actually, most of us have some weakness and there are tests for that. Try this one [color-blindness.com]. It was rather tedious for me; one of the hardest perceptual tests I've taken. You need patience, so set aside some time. I got a TES (Total Error Score) of 12. YMMV because of monitor quality and other factors. The official version of this test uses actual physical tiles, and specifies what kind of lighting to use in the room.

      Good news, everyone! The results of the color blindness test are in, and we also have a new policy regarding who is no longer allowed to change the tail lights on the ship...

  • by Ihlosi (895663) on Thursday August 07, 2014 @03:15AM (#47620837)
    ... my father has anomalous trichromacy. After a while, you learn to ignore any statement about any color from someone affected by this, since it will just confuse you if your color perception is unimpaired.. "Please get the yellow envelope." - disregard "yellow", the envelope might be grey or light blue ...
  • I am mildly colourblind under low light levels, I find it hard to distinguish between blue and green in that situation. This doesn't impact my life at all, except when playing board games. I always make sure I don't play with either the green or blue tokens because I keep randomly grabbing my (green or blue) opponents' tokens. So, it's just a small handicap :-)
  • by bradley13 (1118935) on Thursday August 07, 2014 @06:04AM (#47621337) Homepage

    A normal human sees three colors. We are incapable of distinguishing true orange light from an essentially infinite number of combinations of color pairs (e.g., red plus a bit of green, or red plus more yellow). All we can say is that two chemicals were stimulated in the proper proportion.

    It needn't be this way. Your ears detect individual frequencies. If you hear two tones at 1kHz and 2KhZ, your ears don't average them together and tell you that there is a single tone at 1.5 kHz

    What would true color vision be like, i.e., if your eyes could actually tell what frequencies of light they received?

    • Ears give us a lot of frequency information but very little spacial information.
      Eyes give us a lot of spacial information but very little frequency information.

      Our eyes are already the highest information rate of our senses, "true color vision" would increase that even more. Could our brain cope?

      • by rgmoore (133276)

        And our noses give a truly enormous amount of chemical information, but have extremely poor time resolution. BTW, I'm not sure about our eyes being the highest information rate of our senses. Our sense of touch puts out a huge amount of information, but we're very good at filtering it.

    • by Ihlosi (895663)
      What would true color vision be like, i.e., if your eyes could actually tell what frequencies of light they received?

      Eyes would be useless, as they would supply mostly noise and very little, if any, information. Deciphering this mess would need vastly more brain volume.

      Oh, and designing a useful color monitor for computers would be horrendously complex.

    • by Kjella (173770)

      What would true color vision be like, i.e., if your eyes could actually tell what frequencies of light they received?

      Pretty horrible I guess, this screen would have exactly three colors. From what I understand a lot of other objects only give off particular wavelengths too from their chemical composition, the rest is zero.

  • ... color perception deficiency.

    This poll confirms this fact (assumption: Slashdot readers are predominantly male).

  • I am not colour blind, but I can only distinguish 8 colours, including black and white, because I simply don't care about the other shades.
    Male only :)

  • by Archtech (159117) on Thursday August 07, 2014 @07:46AM (#47621745)

    As I write this, 7% of votes are for "mild" and 1% for "severe" red-green colour blindness. Remarkably, about 8% of males are believed to suffer from red-green colour blindness. (It's perhaps reasonable to assume that great majority of slashdotters are male - if not, apologies to the ladies).

  • http://www.xrite.com/online-co... [xrite.com] ...I have rather good color perception for a male.

    • I've always thought I had better than average colour perception and got zero (perfect) on this easily enough. I need a test designed for people with perfect colour vision.
  • by DaveM753 (844913) on Thursday August 07, 2014 @11:50AM (#47623679)
    At the local copy center: Lisa: I'd like 25 copies on Goldenrod. Clerk: Right. Lisa: 25 on Canary. Clerk: Mmhmm. Lisa: 25 on Saffron. Clerk: All right. Lisa: And 25 on Paella. Clerk: Ok, 100 yellow.
  • I know for 100% fact I'm not colourblind...

  • I've known for 30 years that I was colour confused, it was diagnosed during my pre-hire medical at IBM. I've always described it symptomatically, as in "certain pinks and purples appear grey, my favourite brown shirt is green, but occasionally, I'll see a hint of green". And I've long thought that my CC was partly influenced by diet (the shirt would be greener after meals in certain restaurants, but I could never pin down the magic ingredient combo).

    I have it on good authority that Mars is red, but I see i

  • When I was in high school my Biology 20 teacher found an old book in the library with various colour blindness test diagrams in it, and thought it would be fun to pass it around during class everyone could check it out.
    On the the guys at the back of the class (you know the ones) cheated on it.

  • I drove across the country with a good friend, who is severely red-green colorblind. About once a day, he would offer me peanuts, even though I'm deathly allergic to them, and then he'd laugh, and say "oh, these are really good." After five days of this, as we were driving across Colorado after a storm, I stopped to look at a stunning rainbow, and he's like "ooh, ok, fine, whatever"

    He's a very successful computer animator and landscape painter. It helps that he is super-smart, but I still can't imagine h

  • You always see mice shown as gray in cartoons, it's their default state. I've had mice, and they're a deep brown loamy earth color... but my friends still thought they were gray. So, I don't know what that's all about but, there appears to be ranges of color perception that aren't really clocked as "color blindness", which may not be an entirely useful phrase for something that isn't exactly binary. Now, if you specify that you're "red-green colorblind" that gives me some practical information. I'd probably

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