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Favorite way to add capsaicin to a dish:

Displaying poll results.
Fresh chilis
  4358 votes / 30%
Dried chilis
  1794 votes / 12%
Preserved chilis/chili sauce
  975 votes / 6%
Mild or medium hot sauce
  2142 votes / 14%
Natural but very hot sauce
  2149 votes / 14%
Extreme hot sauce, however boosted
  968 votes / 6%
Cowboyneal perfectly spices all of my food
  1534 votes / 10%
Something else that I'll explain below
  598 votes / 4%
14518 total votes.
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  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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Favorite way to add capsaicin to a dish:

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  • by virgnarus (1949790) on Friday September 21, 2012 @09:00AM (#41410475)

    It's quite evident some people are willing to get the hottest sauce possible just for the wild sensation it produces and not for the purpose it was originally designed for, that being to accent the taste of food. Novelty extreme hot sauces/additives are nice for the occasional dare and prank, and can also be used with very finite amounts to simply add spiciness to a big pot of chili or something. But outside of that it seems rather irresponsible and asinine to go all out with it just for the experience alone. Sure, everyone can eat however the please, yet if I was the chef, having someone lather my food with hot sauce just so they can taste absolutely nothing and get a thrill would probably rub me the wrong way. It's the equivalent of prime steak hidden under a pool of A1 sauce. A touch of A1 or alternative (Worcestershire sauce is great) is great to perk already existing flavor and add some zest to it, but it's a mockery on good cooking when the food ends up being nothing more than to add texture to the sauce they so liberally apply. Like any sauce, hot sauce should be applied and used conservatively, and should be designed with flavor in mind to improve food, not overpower it.

    As for personal recommendation, so far I've been enjoying Big S Farm's Tennessee Lightning [bigsfarms.net]. It's got just enough perk to never be overwhelming regardless how fast you eat, nor is it too mild to be unexciting, but has loads of flavor that I've found works with a lot of different foods. I've found various brazilian and mexican sauces to also be impressive (look for brown and green sauces).

    Oh, and just to get this out, Texas Pete is pepper water, not hot sauce.

  • Sriracha sauce (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Nimey (114278) on Friday September 21, 2012 @09:08AM (#41410589) Homepage Journal

    Just spicy is boring. Sriracha's got garlic as well, and garlic goes well with just about anything that needs spiciness.

    Sweet-hot sauces as well but not as much.

  • Re:Not at all (Score:5, Insightful)

    by cayenne8 (626475) on Friday September 21, 2012 @10:31AM (#41411587) Homepage Journal
    Not to mention....cooking itself, IMHO, should be appealing to the nerdish/geek crowd.

    While I know cheetos and mt. dew are thought of as the classic staples, cooking should be of interest too.

    For one thing, if you can cook, you can impress women that way....it does help and impresses.

    And, think of the chemistry going on there....not to mention biology, if you have a garden and raise some of your own produce and herbs.

    If you like to 'hack'...well, do foods from scratch. I like to grind and stuff sausages. What about home brewing? Many benefits there, biology, creativity in recipes...and hey, home brew makes for a GREAT buzz, and less hangover than the commercially brewed and filtered cousins (that yeast helps you with B vitamins you know). And building a computerized, all grain brewing rig should be up any 'hackers' alley, eh?

    Hell, right now...I'm learning about home fermented pickling....pretty cool stuff, and the results are not only good, but good for you!!

    As for chiles specifically...I hear you on the northern US and bland food. Man...I know I'm a bit of a chile head, but it amazes me what passes for flavor from many people I've meat from up North, more specifically the NE. I've had chili at some of their homes and if it had more that ground beef, beans, salt and a little bit of black pepper...I sure couldn't taste it.

    Ok...I've rambled enough...was about to get into what happened to women, that THEY largely don't seem to know how to cook anymore...but I think that's likely another thread....

  • Re:Not at all (Score:5, Insightful)

    by camperdave (969942) on Friday September 21, 2012 @01:40PM (#41413851) Journal

    I went to a wikipedia,.

    which wikipedia did you go to?

    Well, it's not like there is only one wikipedia. There are several [wikimedia.org] he could have gone to.

  • Re:Not at all (Score:5, Insightful)

    by erice (13380) on Friday September 21, 2012 @05:31PM (#41416299) Homepage

    As for chiles specifically...I hear you on the northern US and bland food. Man...I know I'm a bit of a chile head, but it amazes me what passes for flavor from many people I've meat from up North, more specifically the NE.

    It amazes me how many "chile heads" confused burn with flavor. Dumping hot sauce or random hot chiles on bland food doesn't it flavorful. It just makes it hot. There is an Italian restaurant near here where everything on the menu is bland except for one "spicy" dish that has jalapenos. Ugh.

    I've had chili at some of their homes and if it had more that ground beef, beans, salt and a little bit of black pepper...I sure couldn't taste it.

    But that's just wrong. Chili without chiles isn't chili. There are only two essential ingredients in chili: meat and chiles, with most of the flavor actually coming from the milder chiles.

"Love is a snowmobile racing across the tundra and then suddenly it flips over, pinning you underneath. At night, the ice weasels come." --Matt Groening

 



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