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For work, I communicate mainly through...

Displaying poll results.
Email
  9264 votes / 37%
Text chat program
  2013 votes / 8%
Voice chat (Phone/VoIP)
  773 votes / 3%
Video chat
72 votes / 0%
Face-to-face (Talking/Yelling)
  5917 votes / 23%
Reports/presentations
62 votes / 0%
An even mix of some or all of these
  3860 votes / 15%
Sighs and glares
  2931 votes / 11%
24892 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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For work, I communicate mainly through...

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 13, 2012 @09:22AM (#40638037)

    ... I spend so much time looking at /. I hardly communicate at all with co-workers

    • by antdude (79039)

      Aren't they not on /.? :P

    • by RobotRunAmok (595286) on Friday July 13, 2012 @10:20PM (#40645737)

      I will vary my medium depending upon the Achilles Heel of the co-worker I need to intimidate, ermmm, communicate with. Afterall, the Office is a Battlefield, and communication is ammunition. You wouldn't go after a vampire with kryptonite or take on General Zod with with a clove of garlic, so don't make a similar mistake in real life. The choice is among three weapons, really: E-Mail, Phone, Face-to-Face.

      Never let a Sales Guy get you on the phone: it's like bringing a sword to an Indiana Jones fight. You keep everything in e-mail for the Sales Guy; don't listen to the Sirens' Call!

      There are always the "creative" types, or young punks who were raised online... these hipsters will weave e-mail rings around you. Nip their emoticon-laden shenanigans in the bud by marching down to their office or cube and having a face-to-face with them while standing a good six inches into their personal space. Grip their shoulder periodically. New Media-savvy hipsters hate having their shoulders gripped.

      And be sure to phone the face-to-face time-wasters. These are often women, who will use (either intentionally or subconsciously) the insufficient volume of fabric in their skirts or blouses to achieve distraction and misdirection. Counter that cleavage with some Clausewitz, who said that "the third rule is never to waste time." So Scarlet Pimpernel her ass by avoiding any face-to-face while dive-bombing her voicemail box constantly and off-hours.

      happy to help...

      • Funny you should mention the office being a battlefield, because ours is. 1943 to be precise. We codename different projects "Iwo Jima", "Guadalcanal" and "Wake Island" and all discussions are held in-game through the medium of grenades, rifles, air raids and so on. You should see how we fire people...
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Penn State reference worth mod points?

    • by srussia (884021) on Friday July 13, 2012 @09:57AM (#40638415)
      E-mail: because it's admissible in court.

      FTFY
      • by TWX (665546) on Friday July 13, 2012 @10:19AM (#40638637)
        Pretty much. Around these parts a lot of upper-level-peoples' pet projects don't happen because they refuse to provide written instructions as to what they want done. Couple that with official, published policy, lower level people won't perform these instructions without documented proof that they were formally instructed to do so. This would work to absolve them of culpability of violating policy when it can be shown who wanted them to do something that violated policy.
        • by PPH (736903)

          Sounds like you work for one of my ex-employers.

          No e-mail, no voicemail, no memos. Nothing that leaves a record. Only face to face communications and then that was done in a round-about matter so as to provide deniability should I have been wearing a wire.

          Written records were prepared should someone come snooping. But we were not to take direction from those.

          • by TWX (665546)
            That's actually just about opposite- we will follow standard industry practices and published policies first and foremost, and then written requests/instructions. We won't follow verbally-delivered instructions that conflict with published policies, pretty much period. When instructions that fly in the face of policy are given, those instructions are questioned, pointing out the violation of policy. If the instructions are provided, in writing, from someone senior enough, then they might be carried out,
          • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

            by Anonymous Coward

            I'm a consultant. What I do is ALWAYS do meeting summaries. This has saved my bacon so often, I call the template "bacon brine" (it's so good at preserving bacon). By default it always says:

            "If any of the below is incorrect or if something is missing, please let me know and I will update the meeting summary"

            1) it says a meeting happened
            2) It lets me control the narrative

            the 2nd reason is actually the most important. by default everything I say is 100% correct. It's like a casino, the odds are always slightl

            • by PPH (736903)

              If you think I'm being dishonest, you should have stopped reading the moment I said "I'm a consultant".

              Actually, that puts the strength of a contract on your side. As an employee, we could never get away with anything like this.

              Memos have to be signed by a manager or they are meaningless. And if you push the issue and keep writing them, you'll get shown the door. They won't open it for you. They'll just throw you through it.

              • You can "get away" with this anywhere you work. The trick is not using it to "get away" with anything persay. That is, the OP is using it to wield power, but his methods are still useful. Where I work there is a strict hierachy of authority. Regardless of that, if I'm in a meeting, or get off the phone, and I want to make sure [with no ill intent or alterior motive] that everyone is on the same page, I will write up a summary and send it via email asking them if I missed / misunderstood anything. Frank

            • by Lumpy (12016)

              Nothing better to fry a consultant than video of him saying the thing he is claiming he did not agree to. It's why I record all meetings by requiring someone to be in on the video conference and all meetings will be video conferenced...

              The border controller record function is my friend :-)

          • by toygeek (473120)

            Is that you, Mr. White?

        • by DarthVain (724186)

          Well at least I am not alone. I know of several people that seem to avoid any written proof of anything they do. I email, they call me.

          Then later when SHTF, and I am looking through emails to see who said what, there are just big holes from people.

          It makes it pretty hard to work with some people. Also I know some avoid anything contentious over email, only phone or in person, (not even voice mail) likely for FOI reasons.

      • As is the audio from the security camera with the suspiciously powerful microphone placed outside your door to keep 'thieves' from stealing your sticky pads. A lapse of judgement may prevent you from mentioning it until the lawsuit is filed, but with it's 30 day storage of audio / video, it will be apparent that it does not violate wiretapping laws.

      • by Lev13than (581686)

        My firm is still heavily e-mail, but that's changing with Lync and, to a much lesser extent, Yammer. Looking forward to a time when these alternate options improve the SNR on email so it's only the important stuff that makes it to the in box.

        A lot of short conversations happen over Lync, and the screen sharing/audio features are great when the team is spread all over the country/globe. The audio capabilities leave a lot to be desired, however. IM ports were blocked as recently as a few years ago so this is

  • Morse Code (Score:4, Funny)

    by mat.power (2677517) on Friday July 13, 2012 @09:31AM (#40638137)
    I often try to use Morse Code but no one ever responds.
  • Old school (Score:5, Funny)

    by Norwell Bob (982405) on Friday July 13, 2012 @09:41AM (#40638245)
    I prefer to grunt and point.
  • I'd LIKE it to be all email, but unfortunately, my co-workers prefer to drop in, or worse - call me on the phone.

    • by Neil Boekend (1854906) on Friday July 13, 2012 @10:11AM (#40638541)
      Fart more and wash less. Then they'll want to email you instead.
      However it may also make your supervisor want to find a legal reason to fire you.
      • "However it may also make your supervisor want to find a legal reason to fire you."

        IANAL and there may be new laws I am unaware of but, as I learned from watching way to much Judge Judy, that would be a legal reason to fire someone. As long as the termination does not breach contractual obligations or break anti-discrimination laws (gender, sexual orientation or ethnicity) you can decide you no longer require the services of an employee for any reason, including foul bodily odours.

    • by antdude (79039)

      I have co-workers who hate e-mails and prefer messaging. I hate messaging because we use MS Communicator. I hate its client. I tried to get Pidgin to work, but I cannot figure out its server address to connect. :(

  • ...or something like that
  • Depends (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Darkness404 (1287218) on Friday July 13, 2012 @10:27AM (#40638717)
    It depends, generally IT work is so routine that unless something goes wrong, there's not a whole lot to do unless we're upgrading something, and since I work in a small-ish office, most communication is done via face to face. I'd much rather have someone come get me so I can fix a problem than someone to e-mail it to me and me not get to it until later and have the employee get mad at me for not coming immediately because they can't do their work with a broken system. E-mail is useful for large-scale announcements (its X's birthday! Remember, staff meeting Tuesday) but I much rather have face to face conversation when it comes to figuring out problems.
    • Re:Depends (Score:4, Interesting)

      by arth1 (260657) on Friday July 13, 2012 @11:38PM (#40646071) Homepage Journal

      E-mail is useful for large-scale announcements (its X's birthday! Remember, staff meeting Tuesday) but I much rather have face to face conversation when it comes to figuring out problems.

      I disagree Especially for troubleshooting, it's important to get things in writing, so people know who does what exactly, don't chase red herrings, and have an audit trail of what's been done and thought of, as well as the resolution. This will come in handy years down the road.

      Face to face leads to misunderstandings, and it's impossible to talk people through technical tasks like a quick patch script. Never mind that humans in general don't have eidetic memory, and you end up with dropped work because things were forgotten, as well as animosity when one person remembers differently from another.

      Use a ticketing system that allows capturing e-mail, and otherwise use e-mail. Face-to-face is for management who wants a "feeling" of how things are going, not the low level details that actually solve the problems. Telephone is for customers, and professional phone talkers.

      Even IM is better than facetime and phone calls, but it's still inadequate - you are limited in verbosity as well as just what survives a paste, and even with logging turned on, it's a bitch to have any kind of useful history or audit trail when more than two people are involved in different IMs.

      Also, some people get overly informal in IMs, making their contributions (and I use this term loosely) unsuitable for copy/paste into tickets.

      So my choice is e-mail. Preferably unmangled by Exchange.

    • by amiga3D (567632)

      The large scale announcements are what make e-mail so ineffective. At my work the e-mail system is so overloaded with junk like that, most of which doesn't even apply to me, that it eats up most of my time wading through the spam.

  • The Phone (Score:5, Funny)

    by CanHasDIY (1672858) on Friday July 13, 2012 @10:58AM (#40639037) Homepage Journal
    ... and I

    FUCKING

    HATE

    IT


    Seriously, worst invention ever. Of all time.
    • by DaveAtFraud (460127) on Friday July 13, 2012 @12:01PM (#40639673) Homepage Journal

      Don't you just love it when some doofus a couple of cubicles away has to use their phone to call you rather than get off their lazy backside and walk over to talk to you face-to-face? Especially when you're in the middle of another face-to-face conversation so it's a way to interupt you and whoever you're talking to because they think they're way more important than whatever else you're doing.

      Cheers,
      Dave

    • Seriously, worst invention ever. Of all time.

      The Smellophone [gizmag.com] says hi.

  • You should see the look on his face when i tell him he's getting faxed.

  • Video Chat (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Antipater (2053064) on Friday July 13, 2012 @12:05PM (#40639715)

    It's not often I represent one of the tiny minorities on these polls, but video chat is really the only option for long-distance engineering.

    HQ is across the Atlantic, and discussing technical details over the phone is hard enough without having to explain verbally what part of the drawing I'm pointing at. Email works, but it's slow. So we hooked up the document camera to a video chat and couldn't be happier. Except for time zones, screw them.

    • by arth1 (260657)

      It's not often I represent one of the tiny minorities on these polls, but video chat is really the only option for long-distance engineering.

      HQ is across the Atlantic, and discussing technical details over the phone is hard enough without having to explain verbally what part of the drawing I'm pointing at. Email works, but it's slow. So we hooked up the document camera to a video chat and couldn't be happier. Except for time zones, screw them.

      How can e-mail be slower than transmitting hundreds of times the data to get moving pictures? If anything, e-mail is slowed because of video conferencing eating all the bandwidth. Stop using centralized e-mail services, and send mail directly, and it's quick and reliable. Seeing a blurry picture of a drawing, on the other hand, is imprecise and eats up bandwidth.

      • Re:Video Chat (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Kjella (173770) on Saturday July 14, 2012 @12:51AM (#40646347) Homepage

        How can e-mail be slower than transmitting hundreds of times the data to get moving pictures? If anything, e-mail is slowed because of video conferencing eating all the bandwidth. Stop using centralized e-mail services, and send mail directly, and it's quick and reliable. Seeing a blurry picture of a drawing, on the other hand, is imprecise and eats up bandwidth.

        And this is why IT people get a reputation for not understanding the business. Email is slower at communicating what needs to be communicated, we're talking people time not bandwidth. Yes, you can send a drawing via email but you can't easily coordinate what you're explaining with the drawing. It's a lot easier to say "if you look at this joint *here* and follow the flow down to *here*" and point on a live broadcast than to either explain it orally or circle it in Photoshop and send the drawing over and over again. The bandwidth you could save isn't worth wasting a person on minimum wage's time on, far less professional engineers.

        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by arth1 (260657)

          And this is why IT people get a reputation for not understanding the business. Email is slower at communicating what needs to be communicated, we're talking people time not bandwidth. Yes, you can send a drawing via email but you can't easily coordinate what you're explaining with the drawing.

          If what you send needs explaining, then something is wrong with the communication, not the communication form.

          It's a lot easier to say "if you look at this joint *here* and follow the flow down to *here*" and point on a live broadcast than to either explain it orally or circle it in Photoshop and send the drawing over and over again.

          As oppose to spending two minutes writing down what you mean in a way that can be understood, and isn't ambiguous?
          If you absolutely have to send an image, only send what's relevant.

          Again, if you get e-mails back asking for clarification, your e-mail wasn't clear. That's not a fault of the medium, but how you (ab)used it.

          • by Kjella (173770)

            If what you send needs explaining, then something is wrong with the communication, not the communication form.

            Maybe in your world it's so simple that everything is a "lob over the wall" email, where there's never any need for a dialog, discussion, brainstorming, arguing the pros and cons of different designs and solutions or anything else that require people to actually have a rapid ping-pong of thoughts and ideas, something email quite frankly sucks at. Don't get me wrong, email is great for a lot of things and I use it plenty but it's not the be-all and end-all of communication. You're still trying to shoehorn ev

            • by arth1 (260657)

              Maybe in your world it's so simple that everything is a "lob over the wall" email, where there's never any need for a dialog, discussion, brainstorming, arguing the pros and cons of different designs and solutions or anything else that require people to actually have a rapid ping-pong of thoughts and ideas, something email quite frankly sucks at

              No, e-mail doesn't suck at that. People who are opposed to e-mail suck at that.

              E-mails work because you have a precise history about exactly what was said, by everyone. I've done many a rapid e-mail exchange that took far less time than meetings, and where no one forgot or misunderstood anything, because it was right there in front of them. And everybody is equal - there's no one interrupting or wasting a majority of everyone's time on trivial things because you can.

              Meetings is a social function, and it

              • by Jeremi (14640)

                E-mails work because you have a precise history about exactly what was said, by everyone. I've done many a rapid e-mail exchange that took far less time than meetings, and where no one forgot or misunderstood anything, because it was right there in front of them. And everybody is equal - there's no one interrupting or wasting a majority of everyone's time on trivial things because you can.

                I'm as big a fan of email as you'll find anywhere, for all the reasons you listed above... and yet I still find that often a discussion that seems to be going around in circles over email (with people 'talking past' each other, making unhelpful snide remarks, seeing insults where none were intended, misunderstanding or refusing to fairly consider the other person's argument, etc) can often be cleared up quickly over the telephone. I think that is because over the phone you have a chance to react to the oth

              • When you make a drawing in a meeting it's to compensate for meetings inherently being inadequate to the task - you can't convey what you mean through talking, and compensate through drawings. Those drawings are almost always unnecessary if you had chosen a different and better suited venue to start with.

                OP here. I don't think you understand what an engineering drawing is. It's not a back-of-the-napkin sketch. It's the actual blueprint for our product, with every technical detail, dimension, and interface. Calling it "unnecessary" is akin to telling a film director he doesn't need to bring his movie to a production meeting - he can just email a plot summary over.

                • by arth1 (260657)

                  OP here. I don't think you understand what an engineering drawing is. It's not a back-of-the-napkin sketch. It's the actual blueprint for our product, with every technical detail, dimension, and interface

                  I'm an engineer.

                  Engineering drawings are incredibly useful - but not in meetings. The time to present the drawing is before the meeting, not during.

                  Participants either should have familiarized themselves with the drawing before the meeting, or if it's not that kind of meeting, what's in the drawing needs to be presented in a different manner that's suited for the audience. A drawing that the audience doesn't understand isn't going to be useful. Impressive, perhaps, but not useful.

                  • The time to present the drawing is before the meeting, not during.

                    Sure. Everyone comes prepared and knowing what they want to talk about. But when you're actually in the meeting, it's a lot easier to point and ask "and this weld, why is this so large?" than it is to ask in an email "and the weld at grid H9, between stiffener L37 and the starboard cofferdam, why is that so large?" As I said earlier, yes, you can do it that way, but it just takes more time. And with face-to-face communication, it's much easier to tell if someone's bullshitting you or dodging responsibil

        • But voice chat's and video conferencing is very difficult to search. If the content of your communication is likely to be re-used, taking the time to write an email can be better. Often if I hit a problem, by the time I've tried to describe the problem accurately in an email, I've also found the solution and don't end up sending it.
    • by azalin (67640)
      I would seriously recommend a remote viewing/presentation software like teamviewer (teamviewer.com) for stuff like this. It's free to try or for private use and it just works. Also great for remote administration, but it includes several nice and bandwidth friendly presentation tools.
      That should really make things easier for everyone involved.
  • by spaceyhackerlady (462530) on Friday July 13, 2012 @12:27PM (#40639953)

    I work in a small satellite office in Vancouver (the one in Canada). Head office and all the people I work with are in Dallas. We use VoIP a lot. We haven't felt any need for video conferencing yet, but it will come, I'm sure.

    ...laura

    • Sure, it sounds pretty awsome to be working in a satellite and all. But isn't it rather squeezy? Wouldn't it be more practical to work in a building?

      But I guess, if it's a communication satellite then the VoIP must be pretty clear.

      • by azalin (67640)
        I did hear of some problems with the american education system, but I still hoped that the lack of geographical knowledge wasn't bad enough, as to place Vancouver( or Canada) into orbit.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 13, 2012 @12:28PM (#40639971)

    Because my job is dead and gone.

    (Disclaimer: I used the "an equal mix of some or all" only because "none of the above" wasn't an available option.

    • by coolmadsi (823103)

      Because my job is dead and gone.

      (Disclaimer: I used the "an equal mix of some or all" only because "none of the above" wasn't an available option.

      Well, technically an equal mix of nothing is still nothing.

  • by c0l0 (826165) * on Friday July 13, 2012 @12:41PM (#40640083) Homepage

    The hub of our communication at work is a really beefy machine running Debian GNU/Linux. Communication within the tech dept. is done mostly via IRC (our CEO is a really techy person), and email. Even some guys and gals from the Customer Relations/Editoral Staff, and the head of the Legal Department, are available via IRC at all times, which is neat. We also have a web-based issue tracker (that's controllable by email; developed in-house many years ago) that helps us keep track of things. It's pretty awesome - that kind of infrastructure is INCREDIBLY less frustrating than what we've had at companies I worked before (mainly Atlassian webapps that are all shiny and stuff, oh yay!!1!). Not as colourful and web-2.0-y perhaps, but it is fast and very much to the point. And very hackable, in the good, true meaning of the word. :)

  • by erice (13380) on Friday July 13, 2012 @12:44PM (#40640111) Homepage

    I had a superior (exact chain of command never clear) a little while back that absolutely refused to write anything down. If there was a need for exact detailed instructions it was always "come over to my cube and we'll have a chat". If I asked specific questions in email, she would always reply back with "come over to my cube and we'll chat". Drove me ..bat.. ..shit.. CRAZY!

    When speaking in generalities without a sharply defined agenda in person chats are fine. In fact, that's probably the best way to do it. But when detail is required, it is vitally important to get it in writing.

    The company had other dysfunctions too. That's why I don't work there anymore.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 13, 2012 @01:53PM (#40640865)

      Best way to deal with this is take notes, go back to your desk, and before you start write an email stating exactly what you are going to do, what you are going to deliver, and how you will judge correctness/completeness of task.

      Then email it to her.

      • by umghhh (965931)
        depending on importance of details whiteboard pictures are made. I made photos of those - fewtimes this helped to avoid major misunderstandings
  • -- --- .-. ... . [Oh come on, not even two words?]
      -.-. --- -.. .

    (Lameness filter encountered. Post aborted!
    Filter error: Please use fewer 'junk' characters.)

  • by xanthos (73578) <xanthos@ t o k e .com> on Friday July 13, 2012 @02:48PM (#40641511)

    Japan is +14 hours to us, Europe +5 to +8. That whole instantaneous communication thing is hard to do with someone who is sleeping and they are not in the next cube. If they are asleep in the next cube, then its fun.

    • by artor3 (1344997)

      If only. Debugging problems in India or Korea or Taiwan through email takes too long. Either you suck it up and get on a conference call late at night / early in the morning, or you find yourself on a plane.

  • I'm a web developer at a university. A good chunk of my job has involved converting older paper-driven processes to the web.

    Occasionally projects will get started face to face (usually by a faculty member that stops me in the hall); but most often the earliest communications happens through email. I've found it beneficial, though, to have a significant amount of face-to-face conversation as early into a project as is possible. When it comes to project planning, most of my co-workers can easily see the overa

    • As an aside - I've consistently found that people who want a process moved onto the web will generally spend a lot of time thinking it through before contacting me; but they almost always spend that time thinking about exactly the wrong stuff. At our first meeting they'll usually start out with a very vague overarching description of what they want, then they'll launch into how maybe there should be a form with a button here and a text-box there... when what they really should've spent time delineating the process in as much detail as possible.

      I agree with you on the last paragraph.

      Half the time it's "I want this to do this and this" when it should have been "I have this problem (explanation) that needs a solution".

      A lot of the time we find if one person needs something, that a lot of other people can use it, if we just make it robust and flexible enough.

  • Email. (Score:4, Interesting)

    by screwzloos (1942336) on Friday July 13, 2012 @04:20PM (#40642887)
    Email, email, email. Where I work, if a request comes in that wasn't emailed both to the intended recipient *and* the group/management he works for, it's not taken seriously and is put on the pile of "maybe someday" projects. No matter the urgency - in person, over the phone, smoke signal, and crop circle requests are all told to stop and do it through email or it simply won't happen.

    Great part is, that's totally accepted business policy here, since we need to be able to frequently shift work around and without thorough written documentation of the request, that's simply not feasible. I'm glad the management here stands behind that, too. Surprisingly little falls through the cracks, since everyone has an up-to-the-moment record of what everyone else should be working on.
  • With my students, the answer is face to face. With colleagues/collaborators, it is definitely email.
  • We actually communicate thru posting Slashdot. comments. Our online nicks provide an extra layer of anonymity for those delicate CYA cases.

  • by WillKemp (1338605) on Friday July 13, 2012 @08:38PM (#40645297) Homepage

    At work i mainly communicate via 2-way radio. I drive ridiculously big dump trucks in an open cut mine.

  • But down at the dirty hippie cooperative they frown on whatever it takes to make smoke unless it's weed so there's less of that now.

  • Email (Score:5, Insightful)

    by hackstraw (262471) on Friday July 13, 2012 @09:53PM (#40645623)

    And I like it that way. Email can involve other people. Its offline communication and works in multiple timezones and odd hours. It can be referenced later. It is clear because it is written. I think email is the best thing ever invented. I've never worked without it, and I could not imagine work without it. You could throw away my phone, and I would hardly notice. Take email away, and I honestly could not function. I don't know how work worked before email. Could not imagine. The only thing negative about email is when you need constant back and forth, and then I switch to IM or phone, but email is and will always be #1 in my book.

    • by jgrahn (181062)

      And I like it that way. Email can involve other people. Its offline communication and works in multiple timezones and odd hours. It can be referenced later. It is clear because it is written. I think email is the best thing ever invented. I've never worked without it, and I could not imagine work without it. You could throw away my phone, and I would hardly notice. Take email away, and I honestly could not function. I don't know how work worked before email. Could not imagine. The only thing negative about email is when you need constant back and forth, and then I switch to IM or phone, but email is and will always be #1 in my book.

      One drawback is that it's limited to the people on the Cc: list. Noone outside that group will learn from your discussion, or be able to pop in and comment (unless you're on a true archived mailing list, but companies don't seem to understand that concept).

      Another drawback in my workplace is that we use MS Outlook. Quoting is broken and people don't know how to do it properly anyhow, so detailed discussions quickly become hard to follow. "See my comments inline below in bold red ..." and soon you've run

  • by Starteck81 (917280) on Saturday July 14, 2012 @12:55AM (#40646365)
    Face to face is much easier because I can see what they're doing wrong easier. It's also easier to correct the issue in person. i.e. Slap them upside the head.
    • question out aloud to my immediate coworkers
    • walking over for a talk with someone
    • ditto, after first checking with the IM system so that someone is at her desk
    • meeting with N people
    • mail to a specific person
    • mail to the team or some other larger group
    • update on the wiki, or in some tool like a bug tracker
    • ditto, combined with a mail saying the update was done
    • Usenet, IRC channel, other broadcast-style communication
    • long IM session
    • short IM message
    • the dreaded phone conference

    It's not so useful to describ

  • Have to answer with a mix.

    I telecommute from home, and for such purposes I have a Cisco/Tandberg E20 videophone on my desk, and I use that to make both regular and video phone calls. I use e-mail a lot, including mailing lists. I use Lync, Jabber and Skype for instant messaging and desktop sharing. I use my cellphone when I'm not at my desk. And I visit office like once a week for face-to-face meetings (and customers whenever they need, of course, but the travel expenses are of course reimbursed).

    The only p

  • you insensitive clod. And pining for the day datalink is the primary means of air traffic control (CPDLC or ADS-B or something even better). Current VHF/UHF radio is not duplex leading to frequent blocked transmissions, and HF will lead to insanity- mercifully modern HFs have SelCal. ACARS is like text messaging so I selected that as the only option with any factual accuracy, reliable but slow. Some planes (mostly long range oceanic use) are equipped with sat-voice, but that can be expensive to use. Still w
  • ...because it's the closest one to "hand signals".

    Stalking animals successfully doesn't happen if you're in the middle of a teleconference.

  • I'm a commercial dog-walker you insensitive clod!

    Two secrets to my success:
    1) 98% of what people know about dogs is nonsense.
    2) If they bring up Cesar Milan, see 1).
  • i.e. via endless games of "FogBugz hot potato".

  • I’m a sound engineer, and have to lean over to make myself heard clearly in the talkback, so for anything not overly complicated I use an extensive range of gestures.

    And come to think of it, I sing in small ensembles and sometimes conduct musical groups, which also requires silent communication.
  • Why is there no death ray option?

  • by cra (172225) on Sunday July 15, 2012 @03:47PM (#40657545) Homepage

    I used to like email best, but since everybody seems to be top-posting these days I find it rather useless. :-( I find it tedious to have to sift through literally hundres of lines of headers and footers and quotes to get the info I need; especially if I wasnt involved in the thread from the start. Not to mention when we get a mailthread as a problem report in our support system. Those cases instantly get an extra half hour worktime logged to them!

    I don@t really see the need to quote the mail at all if youre going to top-post. I mean; who has a mail software that doesn@t support threads these days? I don@t need the whole conversation listed in every mail.

    So from the bottom of my heart: F**K TOP-POSTING!

  • by ctrl-alt-canc (977108) on Sunday July 15, 2012 @06:03PM (#40658507)
    and we use it for tracking people. Seriously, whenever I need to contact a coworker, I look at his profile in the messenger window, and if I see that he is online either I call him on phone or I go directly in his office. I seldom use the messenger for the purpose of sending messages. What it is funny is that I discovered that all my coworkers use the messenger for the very same thing. I guess if this happens elsewhere....maybe Microsoft should redesign the application, making a bit more user friendly snooping on coworkers, and possibly dropping the messaging part of the application.
  • A catapult throwing rocks and balls of fire, is a good way to make sure your message will be received and understood in the intended manner.
  • In a corporate environment its always important to have a paper trail to cover your ass. Email work great for this.
  • breaker breaker channel 19

Any given program, when running, is obsolete.

 



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