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Minutes spent on the phone, on a typical day

Displaying poll results.
None.
  3989 votes / 21%
Fewer than 10.
  7966 votes / 42%
10-30
  3255 votes / 17%
31-60
  1527 votes / 8%
61-120
  868 votes / 4%
More than 120
  738 votes / 3%
Shh, can't you see I'm still on the phone?!
  435 votes / 2%
18778 total votes.
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  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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Minutes spent on the phone, on a typical day

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  • 24/7 (Score:5, Funny)

    by IWantMoreSpamPlease (571972) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @02:22PM (#39588667) Homepage Journal

    I'm in tech support you insensitive clod!

    • That was my first thought... does work count? Personal time average is under ten minutes a day... I'm writing this while on an hour long conference call at work - my second today. :/
      • Oh yeah, personal time I'm under 10 minutes a week. If it wasn't for work I would never be on the phone. As it is I'm lucky if I'm not on the phone 2 hours a day. If I didn't wear a headset during the day I'd never get anything done. Thank God I can type while I talk.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      you work 24/7???

    • by Brad1138 (590148)
      "I'm in tech support"

      Hey, when I unplug my TV it stops working! Nobody told me I had to keep it plugged in, I wan't to talk to a supervisor!
  • With email, texting, chat programs, etc, who needs voice any more? Even at work, with the tools listed available, I might spend 10 minutes a week on a call.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Nutria (679911)

      Women (but probably age-dependent).

      With all the texting/chatting they *still* yak and yak and yak.

    • by Anrego (830717) *

      Even as a long time IRC junkie .. I find some stuff just gets discussed better with voice.

      I can say the same about meetings. Sometimes stuff can be solved using all this great collaboration software we now have, however sometimes you just need to get everyone in the same room at the same time with an old fashioned white board.

      Could be a limitation of technology or the people involved.. probably a bit of both

    • Re:Voice? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by arth1 (260657) on Friday April 06, 2012 @08:30AM (#39596223) Homepage Journal

      The poll says nothing about voice. "Spent on the phone" would, to me, indicate any time you use a phone, whether it's for talking, playing a game, sending pictures of yourself in ill-fitting underwear, or listening to music.

      Anyhow, there's a missing option: I don't have a phone, you insensitive clod!
      Getting rid of the cell phone was the second best decision I ever made in my life. The freedom of not being pestered more than makes up for inconveniences like having to use a watch and a laptop. The freedom of being unreachable is awesome.

      • Re:Voice? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by mooingyak (720677) on Friday April 06, 2012 @10:11AM (#39597021)

        Getting rid of the cell phone was the second best decision I ever made in my life. The freedom of not being pestered more than makes up for inconveniences like having to use a watch and a laptop. The freedom of being unreachable is awesome.

        I hear this a lot, and I'm always baffled by it. I have a phone. I've had it longer than most people I know. And I'm always unreachable when I want to be unreachable.

        • by arth1 (260657)

          I hear this a lot, and I'm always baffled by it. I have a phone. I've had it longer than most people I know. And I'm always unreachable when I want to be unreachable.

          Your boss or marketing can't "ask" you to keep your cell phone handy over the weekend if you don't have one.

          • by gfxguy (98788)

            Your boss or marketing can't "ask" you to keep your cell phone handy over the weekend if you don't have one.

            My boss can "ask" whatever he wants. What I answer is up to me.

            • by Kjella (173770)

              My boss can "ask" whatever he wants. What I answer is up to me.

              Yeah, but I'm not sure the absolute hardliner approach is the right one. Yes, I could insist that I never ever take/make a work call outside business hours but then I'd find it fair that they insist I never ever take /make a personal call during business hours. Same with coming in late or leaving early, if they ride a hard line on business hours then I ride a hard line on leaving on time too. Also the same with getting time off and being available to work overtime. If both sides can be flexible, then it's u

              • >Yes, I could insist that I never ever take/make a work call outside business hours but then I'd find it fair that they insist I never ever take /make a personal call during business hours.

                not equivalent, since a lot of business still has to happen during standard work hours

          • by tsotha (720379)

            Tell him "no". Seriously. Bosses are like kids - if you don't set boundaries they'll walk all over you.

            What will you do when they give you a company phone "just for the next couple days"?

        • by phallstrom (69697)

          > I have a phone. I've had it longer than most people I know. And I'm always unreachable when I want to be unreachable.

          Because you, unlike a lot of folks, have good boundaries.

      • No, if you are chatting, gaming, whatever, you are on your handheld computer.
        "On the phone" means what it always did.

    • The question is "minutes spent on the phone." Surely,that doesn't exclude using your phone for texting, email, browsing, playing games, etc, does it?
    • by marxzed (1075971)
      In part I agree text/chat/remote access programs all cut down telephone support time but these days I usually find I'm spending as much on V&VoIP on our internal user support as on the phone. Some users just want it fixed (remote access), other users want to be told what I'm doing as I fix it (remote access and voice) , others want me to tell them how to fix it and having a web cam and or mic can be handy when it's helping them use a peripheral device.
  • by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @02:29PM (#39588761)

    A "phone" is a device that allows you to converse vocally with another person by converting vibrations from your speech into electrical impulses, transmitting them to the destination, and then reconverting them back into vibrations the human ear can understand.

    You probably have one of these "phone" devices built into your texting unit.

    • by skine (1524819)

      Oh, you mean my pocket internet thingy?

    • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      So... it's like Skype? But a device, an entire device? Spooky.

    • I just came up with a brilliant idea. This "phone" you speak of. I bet we could encode data in the vocal patterns and then reverse it on the other side. I call it "Phonedata" ...Wait what? Texting units already use data? Like a..what? a MODEM? WTF is that dude?

    • Re:For the young'uns (Score:4, Interesting)

      by DerCed (155038) on Friday April 06, 2012 @07:27AM (#39595935)

      Or, as James Gleick's reports in his 2011 book The Information:

          In a lecture at Cambridge, the physicist James Clerk Maxwell offered
      a scientific description of the telephone conversation: “The speaker talks
      to the transmitter at one end of the line, and at the other end of the line the
      listener puts his ear to the receiver, and hears what the speaker said. The
      process in its two extreme states is so exactly similar to the old-fashioned
      method of speaking and hearing that no preparatory practice is required on
      the part of either operator.” He, too, had noticed its ease of use.

      • That sounds like a really great invention, he should file a patent on that!

        • It's almost 150 years too late for that, but there must still be room for some patent trolling.

          Let's see, I've got an idea: on a mobile device! Darn, probably also too late by half a century. On the internet! A few decades late, too... I've got it: On the cloud! That's where the money is!

          • Don't worry there are plenty of patents covering cell phones, and many, many of them are still in effect.
    • You are a genius sir. Thank you for making my day.
  • Speaking... (Score:3, Informative)

    by redbeardcanada (1052028) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @02:32PM (#39588805)
    I assume that this targets speaking on a conventional phone (10 min). I spend a lot more texting/surfing/gaming with my smartphone.
    • by Pieroxy (222434)

      I answered "More than 120" because I thought it meant "how much time are you spending with your phone"...

  • Work is probably between 15 and 120 minutes a day. I'm the help desk guy.

    Personal is about 10 minutes or less a week. I don't enjoy talking on the phone, for the most part.
    • by tverbeek (457094)

      I would shriek with joy if my help desk job involved only 15-120 minutes per day on the phone.

      • by Creepy (93888)

        yeah - I don't work help desk and still am on easily over 120 hours a day (except weekends, but I still think on average it is close). I do manage a slew of test environments, write code, test, assist noobs, attend 2 daily scrums... typical Agile programming stuff, though my job leans toward the testing/system admin side, though I would say I'm the jack-of-all-trades of the company, with a little experience practically everywhere (we need someone with automation experience - oh, I've done that! we need some

        • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

          by Anonymous Coward

          What planet do you live on with 120h+ days? I'm going to go with mercury with 1409 hours per day. That's only about 8.5%. Not too bad.

    • by PetiePooo (606423)

      I'm the help desk guy. ... I don't enjoy talking on the phone...

      I think I just spoke with you, dude!

  • Brevity... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by jbwolfe (241413) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @03:33PM (#39589681) Homepage
    As someone who communicates daily over the radio with ATC, I've come to understand the great importance of...brevity. Know what you're gonna say, say it and stop talking. After a long day at work, I find it difficult to release this concept and impossible to convey to my wife the value of it in the area of telephone conversation. This usually results in a much longer call than necessary in her effort to have me stop for milk on the way home...
    • by Anonymous Coward

      From this I deduce you have a female wife.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        I deduced it from the facts that the feminine pronoun "her" was used and because the more effeminate member of a pair of bonded butt buddies doesn't count as a wife.

    • by hhedeshian (1343143) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @05:10PM (#39591143)
      I'm not sure how that would work...
      --wife-tower busband 0-0-0-1-alpha with information hotel, departing work pattern
      --husband 0-0-0-1-alpha report when at grocery store and purchase milk
      --report at grocery store and purchase milk 0-1-alpha
    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 05, 2012 @05:17PM (#39591235)

      Save your breath. Trying to convince a woman that precision in speech is a blessing is like trying to convince a fish that something wet is, you know, that thing where.... Well, maybe not a fish. A bear! Yeah. Like trying to convince a bear that... um... honey is, uh, bad? No, wait. An eagle! but what does an eagle really like?
      Hmmm. Does the woman really like long speeches? Maybe that analogy is all wrong. Maybe it's that one with the hammer and nails. How does that go? Give a man a hammer. No, that's a fishing pole.
      ---
      That milk sounds good. Can you get some for me? Oh, and a pack of cupcakes, but only if they have chocolate ones.
      Or orange. Orange! I used to love the orange ones. I'd peel off the frosting in one sheet and eat it and then suck out the whipped cream....
      Was that really whipped cream? I think it was something else. it was still good.
      Hey! That's it!
      Trying to convince a woman that precision in speech is a blessing is like trying to find out what is inside a cupcake.
      ----
      Nope, still not right. Hold on, I'll think of it.
      ---
      Where'd my ADD meds go?

    • by jcaldwel (935913) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @05:29PM (#39591397)
      TL;DR
    • CPDLC FTW!

    • by StikyPad (445176)

      Ha. I think women believe we'll be insulted if they just come out and ask us to do something. Like we'll be thinking "All you called me for was to ask me to get milk?!?! Don't you even want me to know how your day was????"

    • by kaladorn (514293)

      I'm not sure one should choose to base ones interactions with a life partner on practices from the work environment.

      This could lead to bad outcomes in a variety of ways:

      a) Your suggestions in the bedroom get you punitive actions from HR
      b) Your suggestion about who should make dinner is met with an employment equity action from Legal
      c) Your desire to watch NASCAR is veto'd by IT

      etc.

      I'll never lament a difference in the sexes: I don't believe in pointless efforts being worthwhile and more to the point, if it

    • by dargaud (518470)
      I've never been much of a talker on the phone. To illustrate, I spent a year in Antarctica [gdargaud.net] away from my wife. I called her twice. Once for her birthday and once was because she's emailed me that she was sick: she had a sore throat and couldn't talk, so it was even briefer and more one-sided than usual !
  • My smartphone carrier is cleaning up nicely with the minimum monthly package of 450 "any time" minutes and unlimited nights/weekend minutes that they're charging me for. On a bad month (for them) I use up 15 minutes of that. Meanwhile they charge me for every SMS text (which costs them nothing), and charge me ridiculous amounts if I go over my tiny data allotment.

    • by tragedy (27079)

      Except for a small amount of electricity, the time you spend on the phone doesn't really cost them anything. Pretty much everything in telecom is sunk costs. So it doesn't really make much of a difference to them if you, individually, use your phone a little or a lot.

  • by ctrl-alt-canc (977108) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @04:43PM (#39590775)
    I prefer to spend my minutes on a chair. Spending minutes on a phone is quite painful, isn't it ?!?
    • Do you sit on work when your "on the job"?

      • by c0lo (1497653)

        Do you sit on work when your "on the job"?

        No, but my workstation is... (you know? A train-station is a place where trains stop... etc)

  • by Cosgrach (1737088) on Thursday April 05, 2012 @04:47PM (#39590831)

    On a 'typical day' I generally do not speak on the phone. When I do, it's generally work related and short. I also rarely make personal calls. E-mail is much better as I have a record of times, places, etc. to look back upon.
     
      Also, I NEVER text - I do not see the point. I have texting turned off at the provider.

    • I text when I need to make sure that someone has gotten my emails, funnily enough.

    • by Ksevio (865461)
      Do you ever communicate with people? Email doesn't work for talking to the average person when meeting at a restaurant.
      • by Cosgrach (1737088)

        What?

        There is this concept of prior planning. Works great. Try it some time.

        • by Ksevio (865461)
          So you plan your entire life a few days in advance to make sure everyone gets the email? You never have to inquire where someone is? Do you actually do anything?
          • by Cosgrach (1737088)

            Yes, I do plan in advance, not necessarily 'days' out but certainly hours. My weekends are generally booked out two months. Stuff during the week can be days or hours out. Generally all scheduled via email between the invited guests. If someone has to cancel or will be late it's via email if there is enough warning or they call if not. It's the late party who is responsible to communicate that fact. And if I am late, it works the same way: E-mail if enough warning or phone if not. My 'off-work' lif

            • For some reason, it always seems that people on Slashdot kind of get defensive about their personal life. It's as if they are worried that people will think they don't have "interesting off-work lives." As if that even matters. Who cares what other people think about what you do with your life? If you enjoy your life, fantastic. I don't need people on Slashdot to agree with me to have a fulfilling and satisfying lifestyle. No need to argue with people on Slashdot that you have "a life." Just enjoy it, and l
  • I especially hated it when I had to take orders for parts at my last job, its like listen pal I am swamped, you called for a specific reason, can we stop talking about the weather in Kansas for a second and tell me what the hell you want already, it does not take a 25 min conversation to order a fucking spring.

  • This was the calculation I made when answering the poll, I rarely talk for more than 30-60 seconds on the phone with anyone (hour a week with the P's, maybe) unless I'm on a meeting for work. Although I'm not sure if being on a conference call qualifies as being "on the phone" as much as "next to a phone over which I can hear people talking about something."
  • by Anonymous Coward

    I'm a f@#%ing telemarketer, you insensitive clod!
    *tiny fist*

  • No, not me, the guy that I'm dating. Our days do not overlap overly much - I have a standard daytime programming job, he works second shift. So he calls me every day while he's driving in to work, while he's driving to pick up a client and calls me during his drive to my place (all on a blue tooth headset for those concerned about cell phone laws or his safety). Oh, and if he has a chance, since his co-workers take smoke breaks, he takes an evening Call-the-Girlfriend break. So, before we were dating, I
    • by Kidbro (80868)

      (all on a blue tooth headset for those concerned about cell phone laws or his safety)

      Almost all studies on the topic indicate that a headset does not really lessen the risk involved with talking on the phone while driving. The problem is not that one of your hands is occupied with holding a phone, but that your attention is occupied with having a conversation. A blue tooth headset does not help with that.

  • me: USA | Team: Not-in-USA | Thus: much time spend on phone/video every day
  • ...it had 123 total minutes of use over the four years I owned it. I can measure my usage in months-per-minute easier than the inverse.
  • With the advent of Skype, Google Voice, etc., which provide audio and video chat options for free, I have less and less use for my prepaid cellphone. On top of that, Google Voice lets me place outbound calls to anywhere in the US for free, which makes me use my phone even less! About all I use my phone for is when I'm not near a computer (i.e. not at home or work). Other than that, it's Internet chatting services all the way.
  • Work from home on an online (muck based) game with a group of other coders/devs and we use ventrillo to keep up to date on who is doing what.

    On a side note, phones make a great hands-free vent clinet.

It is contrary to reasoning to say that there is a vacuum or space in which there is absolutely nothing. -- Descartes

 



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